Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Typical Offer

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Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Subject to Validation

Fees

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Course Code

APCRJUMS

MSc Applied Criminal Justice

Please note, this programme is planned to commence in September 2023.

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Part-time

2 years

Typical Offer

View

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Subject to Validation

Fees

View

Course Code

APCRJUMS

Professor Karen Harrison - Director of Research/Prof of Law and Penal Justice/Programme Leader

Professor Karen Harrison - Director of Research/Prof of Law and Penal Justice/Programme Leader

Professor Harrison's subject specialisms include Sentencing, Dangerous Offenders, Prisons, Violence against Women, Criminal Justice, and Criminal Law.

Academic Staff List

Welcome to MSc Applied Criminal Justice

The MSc Applied Criminal Justice builds on students' previous criminal justice-related learning from undergraduate study and/or from professional practice. The programme's focus is on facilitating applied skills development within criminal justice settings including the development of therapeutic relationships, fostering professional relationships in criminal justice settings, approaches to exploring, understanding and addressing multiple needs, navigation of ethical and moral dilemmas, and effective problem-solving.

How You Study

Teaching is delivered through a blended approach, incorporating online learning and complemented by occasional in-person residential events that will take place at weekends.

An Introduction to Your Modules


† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Contemporary Issues in Youth Justice 2023-24Level 72023-24This module explores youth justice in England and Wales. It traces the development of the youth justice system in England and Wales and the principles underpinning responses to youth offending. The module considers how youth offending is commonly portrayed in the media, how this affects the way society responds to the issue and the impact upon young people who come into contact with the youth justice system. It considers some of the contemporary challenges in youth offending and justice, such as county lines and child exploitation, and offences in digital spaces. Attention will be given to identifying disproportionalities and inequalities impacting upon both young peoples offending and the states response to it. Finally the module will interrogate some key agendas emerging within youth justice policy and practice, reflecting upon the evidence base, and the gap between rhetoric and reality, eg Child First and participatory youth justice, restorative and trauma informed practice, and diversion.CoreCriminal Justice in Practice 1 2023-24Level 72023-24The aim of the module is for students to apply their skills and learning within a criminal justice setting. The main focus of this module will be work-based learning, whereby students undertake 60 hours of voluntary or paid activity within a criminal justice-related setting. Alongside this, taught sessions will support the development of skills and knowledge to promote effective, safe and ethical working practices.CoreCriminal Justice in Practice 2 2023-24Level 72023-24The aim of the module is for students to apply their skills and learning within a criminal justice setting. The main focus of this module will be work-based learning, whereby students undertake 60 hours of voluntary or paid activity within a criminal justice-related setting. Alongside this, taught sessions will support the development of skills and knowledge to promote effective, safe and ethical working practices.CoreDissertation (Applied Criminal Justice) 2023-24Level 72023-24The dissertation provides students with an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of applied work on a chosen area of criminal justice. Students may develop ideas encountered in the taught modules or with other issues relevant to the degree. The completed dissertation will be an original and independent piece of work. It should, in the context of existing knowledge, demonstrate in-depth understanding, critical analysis and original thinking, as well as general academic and communication skills. Undertaking the necessary research and writing the dissertation will provide academic opportunities to apply the research skills and presentation techniques developed during the programme.CoreExplaining Criminal Behaviour 2023-24Level 72023-24This module addresses a broad range of explanations for criminal behaviour. It will begin by introducing students to the ways in which social scientists attempt to explain criminal behaviour and the different kinds of explanations that have been developed over time. Building upon this, the module will then look at different explanations in more detail, starting with explanations that consider the social and environmental conditions that may cause crime. Following this, the module will focus upon those explanations that address individual and developmental factors. Finally, the module will consider explanations that examine what may reduce criminal behaviour.CoreResearch methods in criminal justice practice 2023-24Level 72023-24The aim of the module is to develop students understanding of the Reflective Scientist-Practitioner Model and be able to draw upon evidence-based practice in a range of criminal justice and penal settings. The module will introduce students to the process of conducting sound empirical research and the different research designs that are commonly used on forensic settings. Sessions will help students to be able to engage with scientific literature, understand the principles of research, identify different types of data analysis and communicate findings to different audience, designed to inform how policy and practice can be underpinned by up-to-date evidence.CoreThe Criminal Justice Process 2023-24Level 72023-24This module is designed to furnish students with a critical knowledge of the legal workings of the criminal justice system and, in so doing, broaden their appreciation of relevant legal and practical questions. The module will teach students to evaluate criminal justice scenarios from a legal, psychological and operational perspective and to engage with the resulting debates and the overall balancing act that frequently must be struck by criminal justice practitioners in real life. The course will therefore introduce the complexities of police questioning, consider court processes and investigate psychological factors which influence both witness testimony and jury decision making.CoreThe Penal Process (Semester 2) 2023-24Level 72023-24This module covers the full breath of the penal system in England and Wales . We begin by looking at a range of forward-looking and backward-looking approaches to penal theory and question why we sentence people in the way that we do. Building on this, we consider whether these traditional theories are still valid, in light of other options, such as restorative justice. Next, we look at the full range of penal options including, out of court disposals, financial penalties, community penalties and the use of imprisonment. We consider in detail the prison experience, taking into account issues such as race and gender.CoreWorking with people at risk of causing serious harm 2023-24Level 72023-24The module aims to provide an understanding of the frameworks and practices available within the criminal justice system to assess, manage and rehabilitate people who are considered at risk of causing serious harm through their offending behaviour. The module will consider these in the context of a need for public protection whilst also supporting and maintaining the rights of people who have been assessed as high risk.Core

How you are assessed

Assessment approaches will include standard University assessment methods such as written assignments and exams, as well as reflective approaches in relation to work experience, covering areas such as applied problem solving and ethical practice.

Work-based Learning Placements

Students will have the opportnity to undertake a period of voluntary or paid work in a relevant setting. Work-based learning is arranged by the student and approved by the programme leader, and will form part of the course curriculum.

Your Future Career

Programme content on the MSc Applied Criminal Justice programme involves engagement with the criminal justice sector, including prison and probation service, the police, the court system, relevant civil service roles, local authorities, specialist areas of healthcare, substance misuse services, supported accommodation providers, and other criminal justice-related third sector organisations.

Entry Requirements 2023-24

Degree entry would be a 2:1 or above in a relevant subject.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages: https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6.0 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/. These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Students on the MSc Applied Criminal Justice may be either recent graduates or professionals employed within criminal justice-related settings.

Recent graduates or final year undergraduates considering their future may come from allied disciplines including, but not limited to, psychology, criminology, law, social science, and social work, and will wish to pursue a career in the criminal justice system such as within HM Prison and Probation Service, the Civil Service and voluntary sector roles.

Professionals employed within criminal justice-related settings include, but are not limited to, those working in HM Prison and Probation Service, Police, HM Courts and Tribunal Service, voluntary sector organisations, substance misuse services, local authorities, healthcare providers, and supported accommodation providers. It is not assumed that students entering the MSc programme via this route will be required to have an undergraduate degree prior to undertaking their studies. Appropriate professional experience will be considered in relation to applicants from this background.

MSc Applied Criminal Justice is delivered in a way that allows students to hold full-time jobs whilst studying. Programme content is to include assessed work experience within the criminal justice sector, with a period of voluntary or paid work in a relevant setting, arranged by the student and approved by the programme leader, forming part of the programme's curriculum.

Fees and Funding

For eligible students, there are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, UK students can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Programme Fees

Postgraduate Events

Find out more about how postgraduate study can help further your career, develop your knowledge, or even prepare you to start your own business at one of our postgraduate events.

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Prioritising Face-to-Face Teaching

At the University of Lincoln, we strive to ensure our students’ experience is engaging, supportive, and academically challenging. Throughout the Coronavirus pandemic, we have adapted to Government guidance to keep our students, staff, and community safe. All remaining Covid-19 legal restrictions in England were lifted in February 2022 under the Government’s Plan for Living with Covid-19, and we have embraced a safe return to in-person teaching on campus. Where appropriate, face-to-face teaching is enhanced by the use of digital tools and technology and may be complemented by online opportunities where these support learning outcomes.

We are fully prepared to adapt our plans if changes in Government guidance make this necessary, and we will endeavour to keep current and prospective students informed. For more information about how we are working to keep our community safe, please visit our coronavirus web pages.

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.