BEng (Hons) Integrated Engineering

The University of Lincoln is ranked in the top 20 UK universities in the Guardian University Guide 2020.

The Course

The BEng (Hons) Integrated Engineering is usually studied as part of the Integrated Engineering Degree Apprenticeship. The degree aims to provide a broad knowledge and understanding of mechanical, electro-mechanical, and control engineering that is informed by the research activities of the academic staff, but draws deeply on the practices and experiences of a modern industrial workplace.

The programme is tailored to the needs of those aged 18 and over that are commencing an engineering career within industry or those presently working in the industry looking to advance their engineering qualifications. The programme has three streams that align with three level 6 degree apprenticeship standards, with a focus on mechanical, electrical, or control engineering. This programme may also be studied independently of the apprenticeship scheme by students wishing to undertake their degree part-time with the same blended-learning delivery.

Typical job roles are dependent upon the particular specialism and its associated apprenticeship standard. The mechanical stream follows the Manufacturing Engineer standard, the electrical stream follows the Electrical/Electronic Technical Support Engineer standard, and the control stream follows the Control/Technical Support Engineer standard.

The programme offers an industrially relevant degree programme that places students' learning experience at the centre of every activity and provides students with the partial academic requirements for registration as an Incorporated Engineer (IEng).

The course aims to produce graduates who can apply fundamental scientific principles and mathematical techniques in order to conceive, realise, create, and innovate solutions to real-world engineering problems. Students are also expected to develop an awareness of engineering in the wider social, ethical, sustainable, and economic context.

The first two levels of study are designed to lay the common foundations of mechanical engineering principles. The final level provides an opportunity for students to deepen their education through a broad range of specialist modules.

Delivery is through blended-learning, combining distance-learning utilising a range of delivery and assessment methods and supported by online interactive tutorials with academic tutors.

This online delivery is supported by three weeks on campus throughout the year with the aim of consolidating learning and offering collaborative and interactive aspects to reinforce the content from the online modules.

In addition to this, contact via Skype calls or equivalent, workplace visits, and progress review meetings are carried out regularly as part of the programme.

  • Tutorials and Example Classes draw heavily on the students' workplace experiences. These classes provide an opportunity for students to explore and resolve problems under staff guidance and direction.
  • Workshops are used to enable students to work on “open-ended” problems related to real engineering situations. They also provide opportunities for developing team-working and communication skills as well as individual skills.
  • Laboratory Classes are used to introduce experimental techniques and practical methods. They provide an opportunity for students to practice team-working and communication skills.

Wherever possible, the programme will make the maximum use of industry-university links so that graduates have the chance to gain practical experience in modern commercial and managerial practices appropriate to the engineering industry.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

CAD and Technical Drawing (Core)
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CAD and Technical Drawing (Core)

The purpose of this module is to provide students with development opportunities for the practical skills that are required throughout their studies, and beyond. Students have the opportunity to develop their engineering communication skills and gain 3D computer modelling experience.

This module emphasises the importance of integrating skills and knowledge from different parts of the degree programme in order to solve problems through the application of fundamental engineering science. The material introduced in this module will be revisited during the subsequent years of the degree programme.

Computing for Engineers (Core)
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Computing for Engineers (Core)

Many sectors of engineering require high levels of computer literacy and the ability to write computer programs for problem solving is highly desirable. In learning the fundamentals of computer programming, logical thinking and problem solving, skills can be developed and coding techniques learnt, that can support the study of modules in forthcoming years.

This course delivers the concepts of structured computer programming and lab time is allocated for implementing these concepts. Students are provided with opportunities to plan, write and debug their own computer programs.

Electrical and Electronic Technology (Core)
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Electrical and Electronic Technology (Core)

An understanding of the basic principles and many of the important practical applications of electronic and electrical engineering is now essential to practitioners of other disciplines, especially Mechanical Engineers.

The aim of this module is to provide a foundation in Electrical Engineering and Electronics for students, of sufficient depth to be useful, and without being over complicated or cluttered with too-rigorous and exhaustive mathematical treatment.

Introduction to Robotics (Core)
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Introduction to Robotics (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to robotics engineering by providing a broad overview of diverse robotics applications.

The focus of this introductory module will be on the main technological aspects of robots as truly mechatronic systems, including mechanical configurations, sensing and actuation systems and programming methods. Some considerations about the mathematical description of robots will be provided. Finally, students will also have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience of designing a robotic system using an educational robotic kit.

Materials and Methods of Manufacture (Core)
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Materials and Methods of Manufacture (Core)

The selection of materials and manufacturing method is an integral part of the engineering design procedure. The purpose of this module is to introduce the fundamental properties of engineering materials through an understanding of the atomic and molecular interactions within the material. Students are introduced to the technology of manufacturing processes and how the selection of manufacturing processes are influenced by, and subsequently affect, material properties.

Mathematics for Engineers (Core)
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Mathematics for Engineers (Core)

A good mathematical grounding is essential for all engineers. The theory developed in this module aims to underpin the other mechanical engineering modules studied at level one.

Wherever possible, mathematical theory is taught by considering a real example, to present students the mathematical tools they might need for the science they follow. Solutions are considered by both analytical and numerical techniques. Where basic principles are involved, some proofs will also be taught.

Professional and Workshop Skills (Core)
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Professional and Workshop Skills (Core)

The purpose of this module is to provide students with development opportunities for the practical skills that are required throughout their studies, and beyond into their careers as professional engineers.

Students will have the opportunity to develop their communication skills, and begin the process of reflective practice in order to take responsibility for managing their own learning. It aims to introduce students to basic workshop practices and provides an understanding of rules and procedures that may be applicable in such an environment. The statistics topic introduces typical quantitative analysis methods for industrial engineering. These methods aims to enable the students to model industrial variables, framing the problem and making decisions in an uncertain environment.

Statics and Dynamics (Core)
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Statics and Dynamics (Core)

The syllabus for this module can be divided into two topics:

Statics and Mechanics:
The primary aim of the study of engineering mechanics is to develop students' capacity to predict the effects of force and deformation in the course of carrying out the creative design function of engineering. As the student undertakes the study of solids and forces (first statics, mechanics, then dynamics) they can build a foundation of analytical capability for the solution of a great variety of engineering problems. Modern engineering practice demands a high level of analytical capability, and the study of mechanics can help in developing this.

Dynamics:
The study of dynamics gives students the opportunity to analyse and predict the motion of particles and bodies with and without reference to the forces that cause this motion. Successful prediction requires the ability of visualize physical configurations in terms of real machines ( in addition to knowledge of physical and mathematical principles of mechanics), actual constraints and the practical limitations which govern the behaviour of machines.

Analogue Electronics (Option)
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Analogue Electronics (Option)

Analogue electronics covers the tools and methods necessary for the creative design of useful circuits using active devices. The module stresses insight and intuition, applied to the design of transistor circuits and the estimation of their performance.

Applied Thermofluids (Core)
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Applied Thermofluids (Core)

This module can be divided into two topics:

Thermodynamics:

Thermodynamics is an essential part of engineering all over the world. It is a basic science that deals with energy interactions in physical systems, and the purpose of this module is to study the relationships between heat (thermos) and work (dynamics). This module presents a range of real-world engineering applications to give students a feel for engineering practice and an intuitive understanding of the subject matter.

Fluid Mechanics:

Fluid Mechanics is the branch of applied mechanics that is concerned with the statics and dynamics of liquids and gases. The analysis of the behaviour of fluids is based upon the fundamental laws of applied mechanics, which relate to the conservation of mass-energy and the force-momentum equation. However, instead of dealing with the behaviour of individual bodies of known mass, Fluid Mechanics is concerned with the behaviour of a continuous stream of fluid. For this reason, Fluid Mechanics is studied separately to other mechanics modules. Due to the similarity of the mathematical techniques, Fluid Mechanics are studied with Thermodynamics.

Control Systems (Core)
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Control Systems (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide students with a firm grounding in Classical Control methods, which will enable them to work with systems and control engineers, and prepare students on the control stream for advanced topics in the level three and four modules.

Students will be introduced to Control in relation to engineering systems, and in particular to develop methods of modelling the control of processes. Techniques are explored with particular reference to common practical engineering problems and their solutions, and the application of SIMULINK in this process.

Digital Systems and Microprocessors (Option)
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Digital Systems and Microprocessors (Option)

This module aims to introduce digital system design, the principles of programmable logic devices, the implementation of combinational and sequential circuits, and the principles of hardware design using Verilog, a specialist hardware description language.

Dynamics and Vibrations (Option)
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Dynamics and Vibrations (Option)

The aim of this module is to consolidate and build on the ideas and skills introduced in level one. Students have the opportunity to develop their ability to model dynamic systems with particular reference to vibration analysis in practical engineering applications.

Electrical Power and Machines (Core)
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Electrical Power and Machines (Core)

Students will be introduced to electrical machines and power systems and their practical applications, supported by practical analysis/synthesis methods.

This ability is fundamental for the students with mechanical engineering background, if they are to be able to handle electromechanical problems encountered in real life situations.
Students will further have the opportunity to explore a general methodology for the calculation of electromechanical energy conversion. Students can obtain an appreciation of the features and characteristics of different types of electromechanical machines and drives and their applications.

Further Mathematics for Engineers (Core)
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Further Mathematics for Engineers (Core)

The purpose of this programme of mathematical study is to give students the opportunity to become more competent in calculations using a range of mathematical tools. The content builds upon that delivered at Level 1, and gives students the opportunity to extend their analytical skills by introducing more advanced topics that may form part of the modern engineers skill set.

Industrial Engineering (Core)
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Industrial Engineering (Core)

This module aims to provide an introduction to the subject of industrial engineering.

Industrial engineering is a branch of engineering dealing with the optimisation of complex processes or systems. It is concerned with the development, improvement, implementation and evaluation of integrated systems of people, economic resources, knowledge, information, equipment, energy, materials, analysis and synthesis, as well as the mathematical, physical and social sciences together with the principles and methods of engineering design to specify, predict, and evaluate the results to be obtained from such systems or processes. The various topics include management science, cost and value engineering, business economics and finance, engineering management, supply chain management, operations research, health and safety engineering, operation management.

Mechatronics (Core)
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Mechatronics (Core)

The term mechatronics integrates mechanical engineering with electronics and intelligent computer control in the design and manufacture of products and processes. As a result, many products which used to have mechanical functions have had many replaced with ones involving microprocessors. This has resulted in much flexibility, easier redesign and reprogramming, and the ability to carry out automated data collection and reporting. A consequence of this approach is the need for engineers to adopt an interdisciplinary and integrated approach to engineering.

The overall aim of this module is to give a comprehensive coverage of topics, such as analogue and digital signals, digital logic, sensors and signal conditioning, data acquisition systems, data presentation systems, mechanical and electrical actuation systems, microcontroller programming and interfacing, system response and modelling, and feedback control. Students may make extensive use of Simulink and a MATLAB support packages based an Arduino board, which allow for graphical simulation and programming of real-time control systems. The module serves as an introductory course to more advanced courses such as Measurement and Testing, Sensors, Actuators and Controllers, and Embedded Systems.

Solid Body Mechanics (Option)
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Solid Body Mechanics (Option)

This programme of study will extend the ideas and skills introduced at Level 1. Students have the opportunity to learn how to carry out strength and deflection analyses for a variety of simple load cases and structures. Students have the opportunity to understand the simplifications used in such analyses. This course demonstrates the role of stress analysis and failure prediction in the design environment.

Advanced Manufacturing Processes and Systems (Option)
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Advanced Manufacturing Processes and Systems (Option)

The selection of materials and manufacturing method is an integral part of the design and manufacturing procedure for producing parts and products. The purpose of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to learn how to select appropriate materials, processing methods and manufacturing systems to produce components and products, both existing and novel. The student is introduced to contemporary manufacturing processes and systems in an effort to select effective and efficient manufacturing processes and systems.

Building Automation Systems (Option)
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Building Automation Systems (Option)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to modern Building Automation Systems. In particular, Heat, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems will be presented as a crucial element of a BAS. The topic will be discussed considering energy efficiency as a key requirement and will be presented by means of wide range of real scenarios and case studies. Students will also have the chance to work on a real BAS experimental setup.

Combustion, Fuels and Energy (Option)
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Combustion, Fuels and Energy (Option)

The aim of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to learn the background ito combustion theory. Students will be introduced to traditional and renewable fuels, their combustion and utilisation and the resulting environmental impacts. Combustion applications for energy production will be introduced along with the politics revolving around these energy applications. The module will also consider energy policy in terms of usage.

Communication Systems (Option)
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Communication Systems (Option)

The module aims to enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and other key elements in communication systems and the theory involved in their design.

Students are introduced to analogue and digital communication systems, as well as to the use of information theory in the framework of communication systems and their performance. An important aspect of this module is studying the topics of random processes and noise, sampling and quantization, and introducing students to key issues of filter design and modulation. Laboratory work will be carried out in Matlab/Simulink or equivalent software tool.

Computational Fluid Dynamics (Option)
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Computational Fluid Dynamics (Option)

The purpose of this module is to introduce the full Navier-Stokes equations and give the physical significance of each term in the equations. Students are introduced to CFD techniques appropriate for practical engineering applications, (the finite volume method), and they have the opportunity to gain practical, hands-on experience of commercial CFD packages. This module offers students the opportunity to model industrial fluid dynamics and heat transfer problems.

Electrical Machine Design (Option)
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Electrical Machine Design (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and principles of operation of various types of electrical machines.

It aims to equip students with basic experimental and modelling skills for handling problems associated with electrical machines. This module will give students the opportunity to develop an appreciation of design and operational problems in the electrical power industry. Students are also introduced to the modern CAD environment in relation to design of electromechanical devices.

Energy Systems and Conversion (Option)
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Energy Systems and Conversion (Option)

The aim of this module is to provide students with an understanding of the machines used in power generation applications, with a main focus on the principles of operation of machines used in base load power generation (gas turbines), but all rotating machines in power generation are considered. Students may then develop a methodology for measuring the impact of machines from energy and materials usage, standpoints, and to better understand where opportunities exist to increase the efficiency of energy machines, systems and devices.

Students will have the opportunity to build models of mass and energy flow through existing and proposed machines. These models are then used to pinpoint the most efficient and least efficient steps of device operation. This syllabus can be divided into two topics —

Fundamentals of Machines in Power and Energy:
The module begins with the theory of gas turbines, based on fundamental thermodynamic and fluid mechanic analyses and introduces methods for improving efficiencies and increasing specific work outputs.

Energy Systems Analysis:
Students may strengthen and expand their fundamental knowledge of thermodynamics, and apply this to develop a better understanding of energy systems and machine systems.

Finite Element Analysis (Option)
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Finite Element Analysis (Option)

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the theory and practice of the finite element method, with applications in stress analysis, heat transfer and general field problems in order to complement other modules in these subjects. Students have the opportunity to learn of the capabilities and limitations of the finite element method and the practical problems involved in successfully modelling engineering structures and components.

Industrial Automation (Option)
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Industrial Automation (Option)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to modern industrial automation architectures. The module is composed of three parts: i) Sensors and actuators; ii) industrial networks; iii) Programmable logic controllers.

In the first part students will have the opportunity to learn the main technological aspects of sensors and actuators used in industrial automation.

The second part will explore how distributed architecture works, with an in-depth overview of the most common fieldbus and industrial Ethernet HW/SW protocols.

The third part will explore Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) focusing both on the HW/SW architecture and on the main programming languages according to the IEEE61131-3 standard.

Finally, students will also have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience by working on industrial automation test beds.

Industrial Project (Option)
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Industrial Project (Option)

In this module, students are expected to take an academic approach to a work-based problem to create design concepts and solutions that produce an engineering artefact and extend understanding. It provides the opportunity for students to apply their engineering and scientific knowledge gained within the programme in a realistic and substantial team project, and gain experience in team and project management in addition to the research based activity.

Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their creativity and initiative in carrying out a demanding investigation and design. As teams, students will negotiate with their ‘client’, be it an academic supervisor or the external sponsor, develop team working skills, plan their project, and present their work through meetings, reports and oral presentation. Teams will be expected to analyse their different specialist skills, to present the most comprehensive and effective approach to the problem.

Internet of Things and Smart Electronics (Option)
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Internet of Things and Smart Electronics (Option)

This module is intended to introduce students with the fast growing area of consumer electronics design.

Apart from interface and size issues, portable consumer electronics present some of the toughest design and engineering challenges in all of technology. This module breaks the complex design process down into its component parts, detailing every crucial issue from interface design to chip packaging, focusing upon the key design parameters of convenience, utility and size.

Materials Science and Engineering (Option)
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Materials Science and Engineering (Option)

The purpose of this module is to enable students to deepen their understanding of the key engineering materials with respect to material characteristics, their internal aspects, mechanical as well as the physical properties. This module aims to consolidate students' learning from other modules within the areas of engineering science, materials, manufacturing technology and manufacturing processes.

New and Sustainable Product Design (Option)
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New and Sustainable Product Design (Option)

The aim of this module is to give students the opportunity to experience a real engineering design situation as part of a group. Students have the opportunity to gain an understanding of strategic, operational, environmental and ethical issues related to new product design and development through a series of lectures covering an appreciation of market and societal dynamics and its effect on the design of new products. This module provides students with the opportunity to understand the tools and techniques available to facilitate sustainable product design and provide knowledge of the product design processes that can reduce environmental impacts and promote sustainable practices.

Power Electronics (Option)
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Power Electronics (Option)

The aim of this module is to provide students with a thorough understanding of power electronics and electrical drives.

The first part of the module begins with an overview of the main concepts behind electrical power processing and control. Power semiconductor switches are then introduced and their use as basic components in power electronics systems is deeply investigated. Subsequently, the main power converters architectures are defined and systematically analysed. The second part of the module aims to enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of classical electric machines and drives.

Power Generation and Transmission (Option)
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Power Generation and Transmission (Option)

The purpose of this module is to analyse electrical machines, switched mode power-electronic convertors and design power systems for medium to high power applications. Students will have the opportunity to examine the operation characteristics and capabilities of commonly used systems and their control methods.

In addition, students may examine the methods and issues surrounding transmission of electrical power, including insight and understanding of power system protection applications and the effects of system design on power quality.

Robotics and Automation (Core)
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Robotics and Automation (Core)

The aim of this module is to enable students to gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and other key elements in robotics, its interdisciplinary nature and its role and applications in automation.

The module starts with the history and definition of robotics and its role in automation with examples. The module continues by studying a number of issues related to classifying, modelling and operating robots, followed by an important aspect of the robotics interdisciplinary nature i.e. its control and use of sensors and interpretation of sensory information as well as vision systems. Students will also have the opportunity to be introduced to the topics of networked operation and teleoperation, as well as robot programming

Signal Processing and System Identification (Core)
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Signal Processing and System Identification (Core)

The aim of this module is to introduce students to theory and methodology of advanced techniques relevant to engineering systems, in order to design and implement filters and systems.

System identification is a general term to describe mathematical tools and algorithms that build dynamic models from measured data. A dynamic model in this context is a mathematical description of the dynamic behaviour of a system or process in either the time or frequency domain. Students are given the opportunity to investigate methods by which they can perform useful operations on signals in either discrete or time-varying measurement.

State-Space Control (Option)
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State-Space Control (Option)

In control engineering, a state-space representation is a mathematical model of a physical system as a set of input, output and state variables. Students have the opportunity to explore different methods of resolving the control variables in order to analyse systems in a compact and relevant way.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Students on this course as assessed through a variety of means which may include written examinations, coursework assignments, laboratory reports, technical reports, technical notes, computer-based tests and assessed simulations, demonstrations, dissertations, portfolios, and oral and poster presentations.

Successful completion of the apprenticeship route will require apprentices to pass the University degree, followed by an end point assessment to complete the apprenticeship. The University will continue to support students throughout this assessment.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Interviews are not a requirement for entry onto the programme, but may be required by individual employers for entry onto the apprenticeship programme.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

For Home/EU students

The following fees apply to students who are paying their own fees. They also apply to students who are being sponsored by their employer outside of Apprenticeship schemes. Employers seeking to support students through the Apprenticeship levy should contact the School for Engineering.

BEng (Hons) Programmes

 

September 2019

January 2020

 

Credits

 Cost

Credits

Cost

Year 1

90

£6,930

60

£4,620

Year 2

90

£6,930

90

£6,930

Year 3

90

£6,930

90

£6,930

Year 4

90

£6,930

90

£6,930

Year 5

 

 

30

£2,310

Total

360

£27,720

360

£27,720

Individual Modules

Students wishing to access individual modules in any year of the programme will be charged £77 per credit point.

 

Level 3 Direct Entry From Relevant Foundation Degree or HND - September 2021 Start

Study on a top up programme is subject to evidence of relevant previous study at level 5 (Foundation Degree, HND or equivalent). These will be considered on a case-by-case basis. If you are considering a top up, it is advised that you contact our admissions tutor, Dr Abby Samson on asamson@lincoln.ac.uk or call 01522 837953.

 

September 2021

 

Credits

Cost

Year 4

90

£6,930

Year 5

30

£2,310

Total

120

£9,240

Individual Modules

Students wishing to access individual modules in any year of the programme will be charged £77 per credit point.

 

Apprenticeship Charges for Employers Accessing Open Provision

Levy Paying Employers – Funding Bands

Apprenticeship frameworks and standards are assigned to a funding band by the Government. Charges are listed below for Apprenticeships underpinned by standards. These are subject to any changes made by the Government to published funding rates as defined in the following link https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/apprenticeship-funding-bands.

For further information on the School of Engineering’s charges for Apprenticeship provision please contact Alex Borman on aborman@lincoln.ac.uk or call 01522 837920.  

Level

Duration

Programme

Band Maximum /charge

6

5 years

Degree Apprenticeship - underpinned by BEng (Hons)

£27,000

6

2 years

Degree Apprenticeship – ‘top up’ from relevant Foundation Degree/HND

Charge - £14,000


Non-Levy Paying Employers

Non-Levy Paying Employers should contact the School of Engineering directly to check the availability of Education and Skills Funding Agency funded Apprenticeship places for smaller employers. Where funded places are available, eligible businesses are required to contribute to 10% of the above charge. There is an exception for businesses employing fewer than 50 people where Apprentices aged 16 to 18 at the start of their programme can be fully funded.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost.

New entrants require 112 UCAS points or equivalent at A Level, including a B grade in Mathematics. This equates to a BBC A Level Profile; BTEC Extended Diploma with a Distinction, Merit, Merit Profile; or an International Baccalaureate of 29 points overall with a higher level grade 5 in maths. An Advanced Apprenticeship in a related subject will be considered.

Existing professionals are required to demonstrate industrial experience and professional competence and should ideally hold vocational and professional qualifications.

Holding GCSE Maths and English at grade C or above or equivalent is a requirement for all entrants.

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Alexander Borman

Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering



Course Enquiries: aborman@lincoln.ac.uk


Your Future Career

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.


Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

The purpose-built Engineering Hub was created in collaboration with Siemens and, as a hub of technical innovation, houses industry-standard machinery, turbines, and control and laser laboratories.

The Engineering Hub forms part of the Isaac Newton Building, which comprises additional spaces, such as workshops and computer laboratories, as well as laboratories for acoustics, vibrations, control, and automation.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.