Course Information

MPharm

MPharm

Select year of entry:
4 Years School Of Pharmacy Lincoln Campus [L] Validated ABB (or equivalent qualifications) B230 4 Years School Of Pharmacy Lincoln Campus [L] Validated ABB (128 UCAS Tariff points) (or equivalent qualifications) B230

We will offer you:

  • A patient facing integrated curriculum and teaching, with a novel design, following the patient lifespan.
  • Placement provision, in close proximity to, and close collaboration with community, hospital and primary care settings.
  • An inter-professional learning programme, informed by the latest developments in the field, which aims to prepare you for roles within the industry.
  • Clinical skills taught throughout the course involving working with patients to develop clinical decision-making and pharmaceutical care skills.

Introduction

The MPharm course at Lincoln combines the science of medicines and disease with the development of patient-facing decision-making skills and practice required by modern pharmacists to care for patients.

The School of Pharmacy is involved in innovative projects to develop new models of pharmaceutical care. There are opportunities to learn from, and work alongside, our team of academics who aim to ensure that students are prepared both to help shape and develop pharmacy practice.

The course introduces the science underpinning how drugs are developed and produced and how they interact with the body to treat and prevent disease. It includes an understanding of how we evaluate medicines for safety and effectiveness.

The patient-facing skills include developing the clinical decision-making and communication skills required to translate and apply the science to optimise treatment for individual patients within the different sectors of pharmacy practice.

This degree enables you to develop the relevant knowledge and skills to succeed in this exciting profession. The Lincoln MPharm qualification enables graduates, once they have completed an additional pre-registration year and passed a final national registration assessment, to apply for registration as a pharmacist with the General Pharmaceutical Council.

The University of Lincoln’s School of Pharmacy has excellent links with local hospitals, community pharmacists and other healthcare professionals, providing opportunities to develop your clinical learning and skills within a wide range of practices and patient-facing environments throughout the course.

MPharm students will have the opportunity to undertake placements within hospital, community, primary care and industrial pharmacy; these will be integrated to support the students’ learning and development. As part of the placement program, students will have their own practising pharmacist mentor for the duration of their studies. Students will be responsible for their travel expenses and any general costs associated with their placement.

Accreditations

The General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) is the regulator for pharmacy in Great Britain and is the accrediting body for pharmacy education http://www.pharmacyregulation.org/. The GPhC sets standards for the initial education and training of pharmacists, called ‘Future Pharmacists’. The MPharm degree course at Lincoln is being designed to meet these educational standards and to produce the next generation of pharmacists.

All new Pharmacy Schools, such as Lincoln, are subject to seven, stepwise annual inspections as the course is being designed and taught.

Because of this rigorous process you can be confident that the School will meet the standards throughout its development. Further information can be found on the GPhC website together with accreditation reports from all the current schools.

Please note that as the MPharm is a professional degree. We have to inform you that all students studying on an MPharm degree, must abide by the GPhC Student code of conduct. The code is based on the GPHC's Standards of conduct, ethics and performance. Students studying to enter the pharmacy profession must abide by the code of conduct at all times and demonstrate professional conduct in the same way as they will be expected to once they qualify as a registered pharmacist.

How You Study

Two fully integrated pharmacy modules are taught each year, making a total of eight modules. These follow the life cycle of the patient, initially in a healthy state, and then the same modules are studied from the perspective of disease and ill health.

The course is taught within the context of the medical conditions that patients present, and is structured around a typical patient’s life cycle. It is supported by case studies and patient-facing activities, which increase in complexity as the course progresses and the patient ages.

Student learning aims to be taught within the context of the common conditions that present at that stage of life, supported by case studies. These fall within several therapeutic learning threads, that will be revisited and develop as the course progresses, and the complexity of care increases. Learning will incorporate important aspects of pharmaceutical care, clinical and professional skills and health promotion integrated with the underlying science of the diseases and of the medicines used.

The science (how medicines work, how patients work) and the professional skills (how pharmacists work) are taught in an integrated fashion in the context of the range of common clinical conditions a patient might experience. For example:

Level 1 (Early Years)

  • Immunological and Inflammatory Disease – Infant Allergy, Atopic Eczema
  • Infectious Disease – Conjunctivitis, Childhood Infections, Vaccinations
  • Cancer – Leukaemia
  • Special Topics – Pregnancy, Breastfeeding and Drugs, Blood and Anaemia

Level 2 (Young Adults)

  • Immunological and Inflammatory Disease – Asthma, Hay Fever, Contact Dermatitis
  • Infectious Disease – STD
  • Cancer – Testicular Cancer, Ovarian Cancer
  • Special Topics – Accidents and Emergency, Critical Care
  • Degenerative and Genetic Disease – Cystic Fibrosis
  • Central Nervous System – Schizophrenia, ADHD, Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Epilepsy, Drugs in Sport
  • Metabolic and Endocrine Disease – Type 1 Diabetes, Contraception, Fertility, Thyroid

Level 3 (Middle Aged)

  • Immunological and Inflammatory Disease – Inflammatory Bowel Disease, RA, Psoriasis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
  • Infectious Disease – Urinary Tract Infection, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Peptic Ulcer Disease and Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease
  • Cancer – Breast Cancer, Gastrointestinal Cancer
  • Special Topics – Travel, Neonatal Care
  • Degenerative and Genetic Disease – Men’s Health, Huntington’s, Musculoskeletal (OA/Pain), Incontinence
  • Central Nervous System – BAD, Anxiety and Depression
  • Metabolic and Endocrine Disease – Type 2 Diabetes, Gout, Addison’s, Lipid Disorders, Menopause, Liver and Nutritional Diseases
  • Vascular Disease – Hypertension, Ischaemic Heart Disease, Stroke, AF

Level 4 (Twilight Years)

  • Infectious Disease – Pneumonia, Influenza
  • Cancer – Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer
  • Special Topics – Palliative Care
  • Degenerative and Genetic Disease – Parkinson’s Disease
  • Central Nervous System – Insomnia, Alzheimer’s
  • Metabolic and Endocrine Disease – Osteoporosis
  • Vascular Disease – Congestive Heart Failure, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Chronic Kidney Disease.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

On each of our course pages you can find information on typical contact hours, modes of delivery and a breakdown of assessment methods. Where available, you will also be able to access a link to Unistats.com, where the latest data on student satisfaction and employability outcomes can be found.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment methods will include some formal examinations, presentations, course tests and laboratory reports. In addition, MPharm students will be assessed by observed structured clinical examinations (OSCES) with patients or actors; case-based discussions and care planning; problem-based learning and a professional portfolio.

These will address the professional requirement that students are assessed on their ability to understand knowledge (Knows), place it in context (Knows how), can demonstrate they have the skills to apply the knowledge in a simulated environment (Shows how) and in practice (Does).

In common with all new Schools of Pharmacy, the Lincoln School of Pharmacy has provisional accreditation from the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) and is working towards full accreditation, a process comprising seven steps over seven academic years as the School develops. Because of this rigorous process you can be confident that the School will meet the standards throughout its development. Step five of this process is scheduled for early 2016. For further information see:

http://www.pharmacyregulation.org/education/approval-courses

To qualify as a pharmacist it takes a minimum of five years and includes the following steps:

  • Successful completion of a GPhC accredited Master of Pharmacy Degree (MPharm), which is a full-time, four-year course
  • Successful completion of one year's pre-registration training, a period of paid employment in a community or hospital pharmacy during which a trainee is required to build up a portfolio of evidence and demonstrate their competence whilst being observed at work
  • Successful completion of the GPhC's registration exam
  • Anyone applying to register as a pharmacist must demonstrate their fitness to practise, and the School has fitness to practise procedures in place. More information is available:

Standards for Pharmacy Professionals: http://bit.ly/2sh5EmW

Only after completing these steps can you apply for registration with the GPhC as a pharmacist. As part of the registration process, applicants have to make a health declaration and character checks are carried out.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Interviews & Applicant Days

All MPharm Pharmacy applicants will be required to attend a Pharmacy Question & Answer Day (which will include group activities). This is a condition for making applicants an offer. Further information can be found here: http://bit.ly/mPharmQandA

Alternative arrangements will be considered for applicants who cannot attend, e.g. if based overseas or applicants with disabilities

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School Of Pharmacy Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: ABB, or equivalent grade combination, to include grade B from A Level Biology or Chemistry, plus a second science subject - Chemistry, Biology, Psychology, Physics, Geography, Applied Science, Maths or Further Maths. Practical elements must be passed. General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

International Baccalaureate: 32 points overall, two Higher Level grade 5 in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Psychology, Maths or Further Maths.

BTEC Extended Diploma Applied Science considered, depending on modules studied: Distinction, Distinction, Merit plus a grade B from A level Biology or Chemistry.

Access to Higher Education Diploma in a science subject with a strong chemistry/biology base considered: 15 level 3 credits at Distinction in Biology or Chemistry, 15 Level 3 credits at Merit or above, in one other science subject, as well as a further 15 level 3 credits at Merit or above.

In addition, applicants will also be required to have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above, to include English, Maths, Chemistry (if no Chemistry A Level), Biology (if no Biology A Level).

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Pharmacy 101 (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the profession of pharmacy, its roles and responsibilities and the National Health Service. An integrated approach will be used to teach the pharmaceutical sciences (how patients and medicines work), clinical therapeutics (how medicines are used) and practice skills (how pharmacists work) around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in parenthood/early years, such as childhood allergy. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Pharmacy 102 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous module and teach the pharmaceutical sciences (how patients and medicines work), clinical therapeutics (how medicines are used) and practice skills (how pharmacists work) around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in parenthood/early years, such as childhood infections. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Level 2

Pharmacy 201 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous modules and teach the pharmaceutical sciences (how patients and medicines work), clinical therapeutics (how medicines are used) and practice skills (how pharmacists work) around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in young adults, such as Asthma and critical care, integrated with previous conditions studied and building up the complexity of the cases studied. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Pharmacy 202 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous modules and teach the pharmaceutical sciences (how patients and medicines work), clinical therapeutics (how medicines are used) and practice skills (how pharmacists work) around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in young adults, such as Schizophrenia and drug and alcohol abuse, integrated with previous conditions studied and building up the complexity of the cases studied. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Level 3

Pharmacy 301 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous modules and teach the pharmaceutical sciences (how patients and medicines work), clinical therapeutics (how medicines are used) and practice skills (how pharmacists work) around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in middle age, such as a range of GI disease and cancer, integrated with previous conditions studied and building up the complexity of the cases studied. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Pharmacy 302 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous modules and teach the pharmaceutical sciences (how patients and medicines work), clinical therapeutics (how medicines are used) and practice skills (how pharmacists work) around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in middle age, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, anxiety and depression integrated with previous conditions studied and building up the complexity of the cases studied. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Level 4

Pharmacy 401 (Core)

The module will give students the opportunity to demonstrate an expertise in a selected area of pharmaceutical research by designing and implementing a research project. This module allows the student the opportunity to specialise in topics of interest at Masters level, and include extended placements.

Pharmacy 402 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous modules and teach the pharmaceutical sciences (how patients and medicines work), clinical therapeutics (how medicines are used) and practice skills (how pharmacists work) around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in older age, such as insomnia, dementia and Parkinson’s disease, integrated with previous conditions studied and building up the complexity of the cases studied. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

The School teaching staff includes a mixture of pharmaceutical scientists and registered pharmacists. Local teacher-practitioners will also be involved in MPharm teaching and placement supervision. For the BSc Pharmaceutical Science those with previous industrial and research experience will teach you.

Students will have the opportunity to learn through a variety of teaching methods including lectures, which will be supported by workshops, tutorials, seminars, computer based learning and practical classes. In addition students will learn through patient based learning, problem-based case studies and problem-based practical classes, interprofessional learning and individual research projects.

Patient-based learning: MPharm Students will work with patients throughout the course to develop their communication; consultation and clinical skills such as care planning and clinical decision-making. This will be taught through placements, within our clinical skills unit and by engaging in health related outreach projects with the student body of the university and wider community. Costs relating to placements are outlined in the Placements section.

Problem-based learning: all students will have the chance to work in smaller groups to evaluate specific problems relating to pharmaceutical sciences or clinical care under the guidance of a tutor to learn about a subject through problem solving.

Interprofessional learning: MPharm Students will work together with students of other disciplines such as nursing and social care to foster the development of good working relationships and shared care and gain an appreciation that pharmacists are an important part of a healthcare team.

Placements

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

Students learn in the University’s Joseph Banks Laboratories, which offer specialist clinical and teaching spaces, including consultation rooms, a medicines information suite, a clinical skills suite and well-equipped laboratories.

The Joseph Banks Laboratories is part of a £14m science and innovation park in association with the Lincolnshire Co-operative.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Pharmacists are to be found within the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory bodies, undertaking a variety of roles such as research and development, or regulatory and drug safety roles. Increasingly pharmacists are to be found working in primary care, often as prescribing pharmacists with general practitioners. Within hospital pharmacy many pharmacists work as full time clinical pharmacists, providing direct care to patients and may achieve a consultant rank. Within community pharmacy practice, the role of the pharmacist is continually expanding to include medication reviews, early diagnosis and public health initiatives, particularly in healthy living pharmacies.

Many pharmacy graduates undertake post-graduate qualifications, such as diplomas, professional doctorates and PhDs by research.

In addition the transferable skills you have the opportunity to develop, such as communication skills, problem solving and decision-making skills are valuable in many other spheres of employment.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

Our BSc (Hons) Biochemistry degree takes a research-centred approach to teaching and learning, providing the opportunity to work closely with academics on collaborative research projects.
The BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science degree at Lincoln is designed to lay the foundations of knowledge needed to understand and investigate human disease. It aims to prepare students for careers as biomedical scientists in the NHS or as scientific researchers.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The programme aims to develop the analytical and practical skills required to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The analytical and practical skills that can be developed on this course will aim to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
Forensic chemistry is the application of scientific knowledge and investigation to law enforcement. From identifying substances to analysing crime scenes, the skills of a forensic chemist often play a vital role in criminal investigations.
Forensic chemistry is the application of scientific knowledge and investigation to law enforcement. From identifying substances to analysing crime scenes, the skills of a forensic chemist often play a vital role in criminal investigations.
Our aim at Lincoln is to produce passionate pharmaceutical scientists who are adept in addressing the healthcare challenges of the future and are well prepared for careers in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.
Our BSc (Hons) Chemistry for Drug Discovery and Development aims to develop skills in the design and development of active molecules, all the way through to the final pharmaceutical products available to patients. Students can gain knowledge of synthetic chemistry and develop experience in drug formulation and manufacture within the regulatory context of the pharmaceutical industry. This will involve substantial practical experience of advanced laboratory techniques.
The MChem Chemistry for Drug Discovery and Development is designed to develop skills in the design and development of active molecules, all the way through to the final pharmaceutical products available to patients. Students can gain knowledge of synthetic chemistry and develop experience in drug formulation and manufacture within the regulatory context of the pharmaceutical industry. This will involve substantial practical experience of advanced laboratory techniques.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The programme aims to develop the analytical and practical skills required to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The analytical and practical skills that can be developed on this course will aim to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The programme aims to develop the analytical and practical skills required to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The analytical and practical skills that can be developed on this course will aim to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
The Science Foundation Year aims to prepare students for degree-level study, by equipping them with the skills and knowledge needed to be successful in science, healthcare or engineering related subjects. The course is designed to open up an exciting world of opportunities within these disciplines for students who do not meet our standard entry requirements.

We will offer students:

  • A patient facing integrated curriculum and teaching, with a novel design, following the patient lifespan.
  • Placement provision, in close proximity to, and close collaboration with community, hospital and primary care settings.
  • An inter-professional learning programme, informed by the latest developments in the field, which aims to prepare students for roles within the industry.
  • Clinical skills taught throughout the course involving working with patients to develop clinical decision-making and pharmaceutical care skills.

Introduction

The MPharm course at Lincoln combines the science of medicines and disease with the development of patient-facing decision-making skills and professional practice required by modern pharmacists to care for patients.

The School of Pharmacy is involved in innovative projects to develop new models of pharmaceutical care. There are opportunities to learn from, and work alongside, our team of academics who aim to ensure that students are prepared both to help shape and develop pharmacy practice.

The course introduces the science underpinning how drugs are developed and produced and how they interact with the body to treat and prevent disease. It includes an understanding of how we evaluate medicines for safety and effectiveness.

The patient-facing skills include developing the clinical decision-making and communication skills required to translate and apply the science to optimise treatment for individual patients within the different sectors of pharmacy practice.

This degree enables you to develop the relevant knowledge and skills to succeed in this exciting profession. The Lincoln MPharm qualification enables graduates, once they have completed an additional pre-registration year and passed a final national registration assessment, to apply for registration as a pharmacist with the General Pharmaceutical Council.

The University of Lincoln’s School of Pharmacy has excellent links with local hospitals, community pharmacists and other healthcare professionals, providing opportunities to develop students' clinical learning and skills within a wide range of practices and patient-facing environments throughout the course.

MPharm students will have the opportunity to undertake placements within hospital, community, primary care and industrial pharmacy; these will be integrated to support the students’ learning and development. As part of the placement program, students will have their own practising pharmacist mentor for the duration of their studies. Students will be responsible for their travel expenses and any general costs associated with their placement.

Accreditations

The General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) is the regulator for pharmacy in Great Britain and is the accrediting body for pharmacy education:

http://www.pharmacyregulation.org/

The GPhC sets standards for the initial education and training of pharmacists, called ‘Future Pharmacists’. The MPharm degree course at Lincoln is being designed to meet these educational standards and to produce the next generation of pharmacists. All new Pharmacy Schools, such as Lincoln, are subject to seven, stepwise annual inspections as the course is being designed and taught.

Because of this rigorous process you can be confident that the School will meet the standards throughout its development. Further information can be found on the GPhC website together with accreditation reports from all the current schools.

Please note that as the MPharm is a professional degree. We have to inform you that all students studying on an MPharm degree, must abide by the GPhC Student code of conduct. The code is based on the GPHC's Standards of conduct, ethics and performance. Students studying to enter the pharmacy profession must abide by the code of conduct at all times and demonstrate professional conduct in the same way as they will be expected to once they qualify as a registered pharmacist.

How You Study

Two fully integrated pharmacy modules are taught each year, making a total of eight modules. These follow the life cycle of the patient, initially in a healthy state, and then the same modules are studied from the perspective of disease and ill health.

The course is taught within the context of the medical conditions that patients present, and is structured around a typical patient’s life cycle. It is supported by case studies and patient-facing activities, which increase in complexity as the course progresses and the patient ages.

Student learning aims to be taught within the context of the common conditions that present at that stage of life, supported by case studies. These fall within several therapeutic learning threads, that will be revisited and develop as the course progresses, and the complexity of care increases. Learning will incorporate important aspects of pharmaceutical care, clinical and professional skills and health promotion integrated with the underlying science of the diseases and of the medicines used.

The science (how medicines work, how patients work) and the professional skills (how pharmacists work) are taught in an integrated fashion in the context of the range of common clinical conditions a patient might experience. For example:

Level 1 (Early Years)

  • Immunological and Inflammatory Disease – Infant Allergy, Atopic Eczema
  • Infectious Disease – Conjunctivitis, Childhood Infections, Vaccinations
  • Cancer – Leukaemia
  • Special Topics – Pregnancy, Breastfeeding and Drugs, Blood and Anaemia

Level 2 (Young Adults)

  • Immunological and Inflammatory Disease – Asthma, Hay Fever, Contact Dermatitis
  • Infectious Disease – STD
  • Cancer – Testicular Cancer, Ovarian Cancer
  • Special Topics – Accidents and Emergency, Critical Care
  • Degenerative and Genetic Disease – Cystic Fibrosis
  • Central Nervous System – Schizophrenia, ADHD, Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Epilepsy, Drugs in Sport
  • Metabolic and Endocrine Disease – Type 1 Diabetes, Contraception, Fertility, Thyroid

Level 3 (Middle Aged)

  • Immunological and Inflammatory Disease – Inflammatory Bowel Disease, RA, Psoriasis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
  • Infectious Disease – Urinary Tract Infection, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Peptic Ulcer Disease and Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease
  • Cancer – Breast Cancer, Gastrointestinal Cancer
  • Special Topics – Travel, Neonatal Care
  • Degenerative and Genetic Disease – Men’s Health, Huntington’s, Musculoskeletal (OA/Pain), Incontinence
  • Central Nervous System – BAD, Anxiety and Depression
  • Metabolic and Endocrine Disease – Type 2 Diabetes, Gout, Addison’s, Lipid Disorders, Menopause, Liver and Nutritional Diseases
  • Vascular Disease – Hypertension, Ischaemic Heart Disease, Stroke, AF

Level 4 (Twilight Years)

  • Infectious Disease – Pneumonia, Influenza
  • Cancer – Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer
  • Special Topics – Palliative Care
  • Degenerative and Genetic Disease – Parkinson’s Disease
  • Central Nervous System – Insomnia, Alzheimer’s
  • Metabolic and Endocrine Disease – Osteoporosis
  • Vascular Disease – Congestive Heart Failure, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Chronic Kidney Disease.


Contact Hours

Level 1:

At level one students will typically have around 20 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 1 hour of external visits
  • 1 hour of practical classes and workshops
  • 1 hour of tutorial time
  • 1 hour in seminars
  • 16 hours in lectures


Level 2:

At level two students will typically have around 20 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 1 hour of external visits
  • 1 hour of practical classes and workshops
  • 2 hours of tutorial time
  • 1 hour in seminars
  • 15 hours in lectures


Level 3:

At level three students will typically have around 23 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 3 hours of external visits
  • 1 hour of practical classes and workshops
  • 1 hour of project supervision
  • 3 hours of tutorial time
  • 1 hour in seminars
  • 14 hours in lectures


Level 4:

At level four students will typically have around 23 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 2 hours of external visits
  • 1 hour of practical classes and workshops
  • 7 hours of project supervision
  • 1 hour of tutorial time
  • 5 hours in seminars
  • 8 hours in lectures


Overall Workload and Independent Study

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. Students’ overall workload will consist of their scheduled contact hours combined with independent study. The expected level of independent study is detailed below.

Level 1:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 528
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 44%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 56%


Level 2:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 468
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 39%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 61%


Level 3:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 534
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 45%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 55%


Level 4:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 370
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 31%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 69%

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

On each of our course pages you can find information on typical contact hours, modes of delivery and a breakdown of assessment methods. Where available, you will also be able to access a link to Unistats.com, where the latest data on student satisfaction and employability outcomes can be found.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment methods will include some formal examinations, presentations, course tests and laboratory reports. In addition, MPharm students will be assessed by observed structured clinical examinations (OSCES) with patients or actors; case-based discussions and care planning; problem-based learning and a professional portfolio.

These will address the professional requirement that students are assessed on their ability to understand knowledge (Knows), place it in context (Knows how), can demonstrate they have the skills to apply the knowledge in a simulated environment (Shows how) and in practice (Does).

In common with all new Schools of Pharmacy, the Lincoln School of Pharmacy has provisional accreditation from the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) and is working towards full accreditation, a process comprising seven steps over seven academic years as the School develops. Because of this rigorous process students can be confident that the School will meet the standards throughout its development. For further information see:

http://www.pharmacyregulation.org/education/approval-courses

To qualify as a pharmacist it takes a minimum of five years and includes the following steps:

  • Successful completion of a GPhC accredited Master of Pharmacy Degree (MPharm), which is a full-time, four-year course
  • Successful completion of one year's pre-registration training, a period of paid employment in a community or hospital pharmacy during which a trainee is required to build up a portfolio of evidence and demonstrate their competence whilst being observed at work
  • Successful completion of the GPhC's registration exam
  • Anyone applying to register as a pharmacist must demonstrate their fitness to practise, and the School has fitness to practise procedures in place. More information is available:

Standards for Pharmacy Professionals: http://bit.ly/2sh5EmW

Only after completing these steps can students apply for registration with the GPhC as a pharmacist. As part of the registration process, applicants have to make a health declaration and character checks are carried out.

Assessment Breakdown

Level 1:

Coursework: 45%
Practical exams: 5%
Written exams: 50%

Level 2:

Coursework: 48%
Practical exams: 2%
Written exams: 50%

Level 3:

Coursework: 54.75%
Practical exams: 1.5%
Written exams: 43.75%

Level 4:

Coursework: 62.5%
Practical exams: 0%
Written exams: 37.5%

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Interviews & Applicant Days

All MPharm Pharmacy applicants will be required to attend a Pharmacy Question & Answer Day (which will include group activities). This is a condition for making applicants an offer. Further information can be found here: http://bit.ly/mPharmQandA

Alternative arrangements will be considered for applicants who cannot attend, e.g. if based overseas or applicants with disabilities

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School Of Pharmacy Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: ABB, or equivalent grade combination, to include grade B from A Level Biology or Chemistry, plus a second science subject - Chemistry, Biology, Psychology, Physics, Geography, Applied Science, Maths or Further Maths. Practical elements must be passed. General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

International Baccalaureate: 32 points overall, two Higher Level grade 5 in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Psychology, Maths or Further Maths.

BTEC Extended Diploma Applied Science considered, depending on modules studied: Distinction, Distinction, Merit plus a grade B from A level Biology or Chemistry.

Access to Higher Education Diploma in a science subject with a strong chemistry/biology base considered: 15 level 3 credits at Distinction in Biology or Chemistry, 15 Level 3 credits at Merit or above, in one other science subject, as well as a further 15 level 3 credits at Merit or above.

In addition, applicants will also be required to have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above, to include English, Maths, Chemistry (if no Chemistry A Level), Biology (if no Biology A Level).

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Pharmacy 101 (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the profession of pharmacy, its roles and responsibilities and the National Health Service. An integrated approach will be used to teach the pharmaceutical sciences (how patients and medicines work), clinical therapeutics (how medicines are used) and practice skills (how pharmacists work) around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in parenthood/early years, such as childhood allergy. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Pharmacy 102 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous module and teach the pharmaceutical sciences, clinical therapeutics and practice skills around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in parenthood/early years, such as childhood infections. They will again be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Level 2

Pharmacy 201 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous modules and teach the pharmaceutical sciences, clinical therapeutics and practice skills around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in young adults, such as Asthma and critical care, integrated with previous conditions studied and building up the complexity of the cases studied. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Pharmacy 202 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous modules and teach the pharmaceutical sciences, clinical therapeutics and practice skills around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in young adults, such as Schizophrenia and drug and alcohol abuse, integrated with previous conditions studied and building up the complexity of the cases studied. They will again be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Level 3

Pharmacy 301 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous modules and teach the pharmaceutical sciences, clinical therapeutics and practice skills around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in middle age, such as a range of GI disease and cancer, integrated with previous conditions studied and building up the complexity of the cases studied. These will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Pharmacy 302 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous modules and teach the pharmaceutical sciences (how patients and medicines work), clinical therapeutics (how medicines are used) and practice skills (how pharmacists work) around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in middle age, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, anxiety and depression integrated with previous conditions studied and building up the complexity of the cases studied. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

Level 4

Pharmacy 401 (Core)

This module will give students the opportunity to demonstrate an expertise in a selected area of pharmaceutical research by designing and implementing a research project. The module allows students the opportunity to specialise in topics of interest at Master's level, and include extended placements.

Pharmacy 402 (Core)

An integrated approach will be used to build on the previous modules and teach the pharmaceutical sciences, clinical therapeutics and practice skills around the pharmaceutical care of clinical conditions presenting in older age, such as insomnia, dementia and Parkinson’s disease, integrated with previous conditions studied and building up the complexity of the cases studied. They will be supported by a variety of patient-based learning activities.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

The School teaching staff includes a mixture of pharmaceutical scientists and registered pharmacists. Local teacher-practitioners will also be involved in MPharm teaching and placement supervision. For the BSc Pharmaceutical Science those with previous industrial and research experience will teach students.

Students will have the opportunity to learn through a variety of teaching methods including lectures, which will be supported by workshops, tutorials, seminars, computer based learning and practical classes. In addition students will learn through patient based learning, problem-based case studies and problem-based practical classes, interprofessional learning and individual research projects.

Patient-based learning: MPharm Students will work with patients throughout the course to develop their communication; consultation and clinical skills such as care planning and clinical decision-making. This will be taught through placements, within our clinical skills unit and by engaging in health related outreach projects with the student body of the university and wider community. Costs relating to placements are outlined in the Placements section.

Problem-based learning: all students will have the chance to work in smaller groups to evaluate specific problems relating to pharmaceutical sciences or clinical care under the guidance of a tutor to learn about a subject through problem solving.

Interprofessional learning: MPharm students will work together with students of other disciplines such as nursing and social care to foster the development of good working relationships and shared care and gain an appreciation that pharmacists are an important part of a healthcare team.

Placements

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

Students learn in the University’s Joseph Banks Laboratories, which offer specialist clinical and teaching spaces, including consultation rooms, a medicines information suite, a clinical skills suite and well-equipped research laboratories.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Pharmacists are to be found within the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory bodies, undertaking a variety of roles such as research and development, or regulatory and drug safety roles. Increasingly pharmacists are to be found working in primary care, often as prescribing pharmacists with general practitioners. Within hospital pharmacy many pharmacists work as full time clinical pharmacists, providing direct care to patients and may achieve a consultant rank. Within community pharmacy practice, the role of the pharmacist is continually expanding to include medication reviews, early diagnosis and public health initiatives, particularly in healthy living pharmacies.

Many pharmacy graduates undertake post-graduate qualifications, such as diplomas, professional doctorates and PhDs by research.

In addition the transferable skills students have the opportunity to develop, such as communication skills, problem solving and decision-making skills are valuable in many other spheres of employment.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

Our BSc (Hons) Biochemistry degree takes a research-centred approach to teaching and learning, providing the opportunity to work closely with academics on collaborative research projects.
The BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science degree at Lincoln is designed to lay the foundations of knowledge needed to understand and investigate human disease. It aims to prepare students for careers as biomedical scientists in the NHS or as scientific researchers.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The programme aims to develop the analytical and practical skills required to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The analytical and practical skills that can be developed on this course will aim to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
Forensic chemistry is the application of scientific knowledge and investigation to law enforcement. From identifying substances to analysing crime scenes, the skills of a forensic chemist often play a vital role in criminal investigations.
Forensic chemistry is the application of scientific knowledge and investigation to law enforcement. From identifying substances to analysing crime scenes, the skills of a forensic chemist often play a vital role in criminal investigations.
Our aim at Lincoln is to produce passionate pharmaceutical scientists who are adept in addressing the healthcare challenges of the future and are well prepared for careers in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.
Our BSc (Hons) Chemistry for Drug Discovery and Development aims to develop skills in the design and development of active molecules, all the way through to the final pharmaceutical products available to patients. Students can gain knowledge of synthetic chemistry and develop experience in drug formulation and manufacture within the regulatory context of the pharmaceutical industry. This will involve substantial practical experience of advanced laboratory techniques.
The MChem Chemistry for Drug Discovery and Development is designed to develop skills in the design and development of active molecules, all the way through to the final pharmaceutical products available to patients. Students can gain knowledge of synthetic chemistry and develop experience in drug formulation and manufacture within the regulatory context of the pharmaceutical industry. This will involve substantial practical experience of advanced laboratory techniques.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The programme aims to develop the analytical and practical skills required to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The analytical and practical skills that can be developed on this course will aim to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The programme aims to develop the analytical and practical skills required to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
Chemistry plays a key role in tackling global challenges such as energy production, health and wellbeing, food security and the use of natural resources. The analytical and practical skills that can be developed on this course will aim to prepare students for a wide range of science-related careers.
The Science Foundation Year aims to prepare students for degree-level study, by equipping them with the skills and knowledge needed to be successful in science, healthcare or engineering related subjects. The course is designed to open up an exciting world of opportunities within these disciplines for students who do not meet our standard entry requirements.

Tuition Fees

2017/18 EntryUK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,500 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2018/19 EntryUK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

In 2017/18, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

In 2018/19, fees may increase in line with Government Policy. We will update this information when fees for 2018/19 are finalised.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions].