Live Chat Software
Course Information

BA (Hons)

BA (Hons)

Select year of entry:
3 years 6 years School of Fine & Performing Arts Lincoln Campus [L] Validated 280 points (See below) W400 3 years 6 years School of Fine & Performing Arts Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (See below) W400

11thDrama and Dance courses at Lincoln are ranked joint 11th in the UK for graduate prospects according to The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016.

Introduction

Our BA (Hons) Drama degree puts the creativity of performance at centre stage. With modules that explore a variety of genres and playwrights, the programme aims to prepare students for a range of careers in the theatre and media, both on and off stage.

Students have the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of professional practice and an appreciation of diverse performances. A broad range of optional modules is designed to enable students to inform the direction of their study and explore specialist areas such as acting, musical theatre or stage management.

There are opportunities to participate in a variety of productions, collaborate with other departments and external companies, work with academics on research projects and perform at national and international festivals. Students may decide to join our semi-professional theatre group, The Lincoln Company, and benefit from enhanced opportunities to perform. The highlight of which are our annual performances at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, which will incur additional costs. You may also enjoy an opportunity to study abroad in North America for a term in your second year. Costs relating to a period of study abroad are outlined under the Features tab.

Is This Course Right For Me?

This course is ideal for students who have a passion for the study of Drama as an academic subject. The balance of practical and scholarly approaches is about equal, and a range of optional modules available throughout the degree aim to enable students to tailor the course to suit their interests.

How You Study

The history of performance, tragedy and comedy, and modern European drama are all covered in the first year of study, with the aim of ensuring students have a full understanding of the structures within which the world of theatre operates. In the second and third years, students can choose from a wide range of options including stage combat, teaching drama, physical theatre and theatre for young audiences.

For specific modules, learning can also take place via placements, screenings and viewing theatrical performances. Each student will receive event/performance credits at £90 p/a, which can be used against ticketed performances at the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre. Information on costs relating to placements can be found under the Features tab.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of your degree. However, remember that you are engaging in a full-time degree; so, at the very least, you should expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time and you may undertake assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Are Assessed

As this course aims to develop a wide range of practical and intellectual skills, assessment is varied and includes presentations, written projects, individual and group practical work, projects and portfolios, in addition to academic essays.

There are no formal end-of-year examinations. Throughout the degree, students are assessed through their production of practical and written work.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Methods of Assessment

The way you will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Interviews & Applicant Days

As part of the admissions process, all Drama applicants are required to attend an interview with tutors from the Lincoln School of Fine & Performing Arts. For further information please follow this link: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/dandauditions

What We Look For In Your Application

Students do not need to be a star performer on the stage. They will, however, need plenty of passion and commitment in order to energetically engage with the course, in terms of both practice and scholarship. Expect to work hard, both in and outside of class. A willingness to read, broadly and deeply, is a must for any degree-level course.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of Fine & Performing Arts Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2016-17

Applicants should have a minimum of 280 UCAS tariff points and at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (or equivalent), including English Language.

We also accept a wide range of other qualifications including the BTEC Extended Diploma, Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma, the European and International Baccalaureate Diplomas, and Advanced Diplomas. More information on tariff values is available on the UCAS website http://lncn.eu/cdez

Mature students with extensive relevant experience will be selected on individual merit. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

If you would like further information about entry requirements or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on + 44 (0)1522 886097 or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Academic Skills

This course aims to develop a broad range of skills needed to study successfully at university level. It aims to provide a supportive atmosphere as students adapt to university life and begin to understand the demands of their respective courses. Recognising the different school/college experiences of our students, it is hoped that this course will enable each student to become proficient readers, writers and researchers while providing key transferable skills for their university course and after.

Documentary and Political Theatre (Option)

In recent years, documentary theatre has again come to the fore, creating a new politicised theatrical arena. Part of a specific and rich genealogy, these modern incarnations examine the contemporary world through a dynamic and challenging dramatic form. This module aims to provide students with an opportunity to critically examine a range of plays from the twentieth century. Taking these examples as starting points, students may design and produce their own productions dealing with contemporary issues and news stories. During the course the students can learn more about the relationship between political engagement and the theatrical sphere. They will have the opportunity to examine and workshop a number of plays that seek to present the contemporary world on the stage, using these experiences as they create their own piece.

Histories of Performance

This module aims to introduce students to key moments and movements in the history of the Western theatre. Using a variety of case studies, students can learn how to contextualise each play within its specific historical context to understand the relationship between the play text and the theatrical, social, political, and historical conditions in which it was first performed. Interactive lectures and seminars will include a variety of activities including class discussions, presentations, debates, creative tasks, and performative script readings.

Improvising and Devising

Where do we start to make a piece of new work and why do we need to? What tools and processes are at the disposal of the artist to assist the process of making? What is the history of devised theatre and who are the key practitioners in this area? What is the ethos behind the work of such practitioners as DV8 or Forced Entertainment?

These are some of the questions that will be posed by this module. Improvisation and Devising aims to provide level one students with a foundation in the techniques of improvisation as a tool for the creation of new work. It will seek to engage students in understanding improvisation techniques and devised work as a valuable method of making theatre. Furthermore it will set out to emphasise the importance of process over product when working in a collaborative environment.

Modern European Drama

‘Modern European Drama’ will examine a range of European movements, playwrights and practitioners from the first half of the twentieth century. Using naturalism as a starting point, this module gives students the opportunity to discover some of the most exciting performances of the early twentieth-century theatre. While recognising the continued importance and influence of the naturalist mode, this modules aims to explore plays and movements that challenged, adapted and/or reappropriated this important theatrical genre. Rather than focus exclusively on the written texts, there will be ample opportunity to explore notions of acting space, the moving body, and the cross-generic nature of the modern European stage. The module will examine some key playtexts (both canonical and less well-known) by taking them off the page in practical workshops informed by a programme of interactive seminars.

Reading Performance

This core module at Level One aims to introduce students to a range of theoretical approaches to performance through practice. During the course of the module, students may work on an ensemble production to present for public performance at the end. By engaging with relevant theories by important thinkers, the module introduces some of the pressing critical questions of our time. These may relate to race, class, gender and theories of the body and knowledge-making. With tutor guidance, students may apply that particular theory to the practice of performance-making.

Tragedy and Comedy (Option)

What do we think of as tragedy or comedy? When does something tragic become comic and vice versa? How thin is the line between these genres or has indeed this line broken down? To what extent are previous distinctions still helpful and valid?

This introductory level one module will set out to examine these questions by exploring the origins and developments of these genres beginning with Aristotle’s founding text on Tragedy. It will set out to gain an understanding of the form and structure of the Aristotelian model before going on to explore the ways in which these and other models can be applied to historic and more contemporary texts. Students will have the opportunity to examine various subgenres of tragedy and comedy and learn how to analyse them in their historical, ideological and social contexts as well as engaging with the texts on a practical performance level.

Level 2

Acting the Song (Option)

This is a practical module in which students can explore the techniques of singing and acting song. Students have the opportunity to work on both ensemble numbers and individual numbers, to develop vocal technique, group singing skills, acting approaches to song and character building techniques for musical theatre.

The final performance of both ensemble and solo numbers aims to leave students with the skill to put together a portfolio of song material appropriate for their voice. Assessment will be part practical, and part based on an annotated rehearsal log put together throughout the process. Studying 'The Musical' in Semester A is a prerequisite for 'Acting the Song' in Semester B.

Arts Management (Option)

During this module students have the opportunity to examine and investigate the necessary skills that make up arts management so they are better equipped to develop careers in the arts upon graduation. The module explores various elements of arts management through task- based exercises, group and individual working and guest speakers. The module tutor works with students to identify a relevant case study based on an arts organisation or theatre company.

British Theatre Since 1956 (Option)

This module surveys a range of dramatic works from major British playwrights produced between 1956 - 1996. In lectures and seminars, the work of writers such as Edward Bond, Sarah Kane, Harold Pinter and Martin Crimp will be examined in relation to its social, historical, and political context.

Methods of Practice (Option)

Throughout this module students may develop and deepen their knowledge and practice of delivering dance in a range of practitioner settings. Students have the opportunity to practice, analyse and discuss some of the possible strategies for working in more challenging environments, such as integrated settings and with hard to reach groups. A range of established dance practitioners share their practice with you throughout this module, providing students with an excellent insight to the many varied ways of engaging people in dance.

Performance in Social and Community Contexts (Option)

What do we think of as a community? How many ways are people part of particular communities? What binds communities together and how can particular communities communicate their shared narratives and rituals through a variety of arts-based interventions? How might particular communities benefit from the intervention of drama as a tool for the improvement of individuals and societies in non-traditional theatrical contexts?

In the module, students may address these questions through studio based practical activities examining various social, historical, cultural and political contexts as well as engaging with Case Studies on key practitioners in this area. This module also examines how drama might function in non-traditional theatrical settings, for example: schools, prisons, care homes, on the street or hostels.

Placements (Fine & Performing Arts) (Option)

On completion of their degree, students need to be able to decide how best to employ the skills that they have gained. As well as the more obvious routes within a performing arts degree such as teaching, students need to be aware of what other options may be open to them practically, to explore their route out of the University and on into appropriate employment.

This module encourages students to think beyond the confines of the University, reaching into the wider community to hone their skills for future employment. This module should enable students to examine closely how various arts based organisations work from day to day, whilst at the same time relating that experience to their studies.

Post-colonial Drama (Option)

This optional module at Level Two surveys drama from post-colonial countries such as Australia, Nigeria and Kenya as well as plays addressing the issue of imperialism from within imperialist countries and city states such as the UK and Ancient Athens. How such drama in post-colonial countries forms a recuperative enterprise by countering the rhetoric of imperialism is central to the module.

Practitioners in Practice (Option)

This practice-orientated optional module at level two aims to introduce students to key drama practitioners and theatre-makers who have had and who continue to have a profound influence on contemporary theatre.

What can the theatre practices of Edward Gordon Craig and Vsevolod Meyerhold teach us in our approach to making theatre today? How is their work related to the practice of Forced Entertainment and Tim Etchells, Jerzy Grotowski, Tadeusz Kantor, Joan Littlewood and Peter Brook? In other words, how did we get from Craig and Meyerhold to Littlewood, Grotowski, Brook, Kantor and Forced Entertainment?

Each section in the module will examine a different practitioner. Students may research the historical, cultural and political context of each practitioner’s work and can explore the main principles of the practitioner’s ideas and approaches towards training and theatre practice. Students will then have the opportunity to apply this theory to their own practice in weekly work-in-progress sessions.

Production Skills (Option)

This module aims to provide a basic introduction to the production process of a working theatre. It focuses on three key elements of production: Stage Management, Lighting and Sound.

The module aims to introduce students to a range of technical terms within the production realm and trains students in rudimentary safe working practices conforming to Health & Safety legislation. The module has a vocational strand to it and acts as a training platform for future paid work in the LPAC facility as well as providing excellent routes into the professional world beyond.

Restoration and Melodrama (Level 2) (Option)

Spanning an historical period that begins in 1660 with the restoration of the theatres after the English Civil War and ends in the late nineteenth century, ‘Restoration to Melodrama’ will aim to introduce students to a range of plays and theatrical practices.

Shakespeare and Performance

This module aims to introduce students to the opportunities and challenges of performing Shakespeare’s plays on the contemporary stage.

In a series of lectures, seminars and screenings, students are invited to examine the staging history of a selection of Shakespeare’s plays, exploring how the plays were shaped by their original staging conditions, as well as how the plays have been re-imagined to produce new meanings for contemporary audiences.

Students can learn how to examine the text with an eye to its theatrical potential: they will be asked to work in ensembles to mount a production of an abridged Shakespeare play, taking on roles such as actor, director, designer or stage manager. The process will begin by inviting students to participate in a series of practical workshops designed to help them to develop their vocal and physical acting skills. The module will culminate in a festival of the productions that the students have had the opportunity to create, presented to a public audience.

Stage Combat (Option)

This module aims to introduce the basics of engaging in stage combat and gives students the option of taking the Academy of Performance Combat Basic Three Weapon exam.

Teaching Drama (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to teaching drama in schools and enables them to take part in a mix of practical workshops, interactive seminars and school-based research projects. It promotes the teaching of drama as a subject in its own right and helps students review their own experiences and concepts of drama.

The module will take account of the latest developments in all areas of drama teaching while emphasising recent developments curriculum developments at GCSE, AS, A level and BTEC levels. The module explores how the teaching of drama as a discreet subject links with the National Curriculum at Key Stage 3. The module aims to introduce students to a range of educational and drama-specific strategies enabling them to teach a successful lesson or run a successful workshop.

The Musical (Option)

Why are musicals so popular (and why are some more popular than others)? What can a musical tell us about the culture in which it is produced and staged? How do you apply a critical framework to a study of the musical?

These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this module. In interactive lecture/seminars, students will have the opportunity to investigate how the musical, whilst operating as a mainstream form of popular theatrical entertainment, it similarly can be seen to engage with, challenge or enforce issues of race, gender, class and national identity. The module will provide a historical framework for a study of the musical, and will explore the origins and development of the genre of musical theatre both on the American and the British stage.

Twentieth Century American Drama (Level 2) (Option)

Taught through lectures and seminars, this optional module at level two aims to introduce students to: the historical cultural and theatrical contexts of American drama; issues around the ‘Americanisms’ of American drama; canonical texts; the American avant-garde.

Level 3

Acting For Media (Option)

Acting for the Media’ explores the particular skills and techniques needed to act in front of the camera (film or television) and the microphone (radio / audio). The module is expressly about learning how to act for radio/audio, and for camera. Irrespective of whichever media an actor is working in, there is only either good or bad acting. Basic acting skills around focus, concentration, commitment, imagination are vitally important for film and radio. The ability to study and analyse a script so that the dramatic situation (‘the given circumstances’) and the world of the play are understood is vitally important. Without undergoing this process it is not possible to characterise a role, or to get to grips with subtext, objectives, obstacles and actions, so crucial to successful acting in the media.

The technical skills (‘technique’) required to act for the camera or radio (audio) are different from those needed for acting on stage before a live audience. Stage acting is often in a heightened manner, requiring vocal projection and the defining, in three dimensions, of stage space. Acting for the camera or radio requires careful modulation in order to achieve more intimacy and focus. Working with television and / or film scripts, and with radio drama scripts, achieving the ability to create dramatic effect through look alone, or by the use of voice alone, are essential craft skills that will be learned. As a by-product of the practical work with camera and the microphone, the module also aims to acquaint students with an understanding of production methods for television or film and for radio and audio. The module concludes with a final recording of either a radio or camera script (75% weighting), and a choice of approach to the 2000 word written assessment (25%).

Advanced Acting Technique (Option)

The module is about acting. Seen from the actor/character point of view, it is about actions and objectives, which are what you do in order to get what you need. The module examines various strategies and approaches that are about this, all of which refer, in different ways, to Stanislavski’s ground-breaking work on actions and objectives.

Using scene study as the initial focus for the work, followed by the staging and acting of two scenes, the module aims to teach students how to act better. It aims to refine acting technique, and instil solid, manageable principles about the craft of acting. There is also a directing dimension to the module, insomuch as the scenes have to be interpreted and staged; scene and play analysis is also fundamental to the work of the director. No actor (or director) can begin to act (or direct) successfully without knowing how best to mine the text, wherein most clues are to be found about how to perform the scene, the character and the play.

The first half of the module gives students the opportunity to work on a modern or contemporary naturalistic scene, followed by a classical scene in the second half of the module, either from Shakespeare or another Elizabethan or Jacobean playwright. Scenes are usually performed in duologues. The first part of the module concentrates on introducing acting and scene study techniques, which are then polished and made explicit in the scene work performed. The module concludes with a public performance of the two scenes plus a post-show discussion (75% weighting), plus a written component of 2000 words (25%).

British Theatre as Industry (Option)

Theatre cannot be described or explained by reading scripts. Rather, it is an industry consisting of writers, devisers, producers, directors, actors, designers, managers, agents, publicists, training institutions, buildings, sources of money, communications networks and so on. This module will be useful to students considering arts administration and others interested in discovering how things work.

Contemporary Experimental Performance (Option)

This optional module at level three explores developments in contemporary performance through an investigation of a range of contemporary practitioners whose work has historically grown out of experimental, multi-media and multi-disciplinary approaches, and which has led to a contemporary hybrid form of avant-garde theatre which synthesises and mixes dramatic forms, genres and performance styles.

During the course of the module students will have the opportunity to develop their own small group practical work in studio-based workshops / rehearsal sessions, with the emphasis on exploring new approaches to theatre-making and performance. Each group's work may then be presented for public performance at the end of the module.

Directing (Option)

This optional module at level three aims to introduce students to the practical process of directing for theatre, from researching the script, through casting, auditions and rehearsals to reviewing performances. It is taught through seminars and practical, studio-based classes. Principles and practices developed in class are applied by students to individually-chosen plays.

Dissertation (Fine & Performing Arts)

The Dissertation provides the opportunity for a student to investigate and pursue a fine and performing arts based topic of his or her own choosing, and in more depth than is normally possible in a conventional essay.

Each student will be offered mentorship, though the emphasis will fall on independent learning. Students will be expected to work on their own initiative and to provide clear evidence of their ability to collect, select and evaluate relevant information, which can subsequently be presented in a clear and logical manner, in the form of a 9000 word dissertation.

Multimedia Performance (Option)

This optional module at level three aims to explore multimedia, inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary applications through live theatrical performance, in which students working in groups may make their own multimedia performance which is presented publicly as a final degree show.

Off the Page (Option)

This module is about creativity and places the creative process at its very core. Each student on the module can develop a short play over the course of the semester while at the same time having the opportunity to examine some key skills in playwriting and dramaturgy by discussing and responding to the work of other playwrights. The focus of the module is always on the work itself which evolves week by week into a final draft of a short play.

Physical Theatre (Option)

This practice-orientated optional module at level three aims to introduce students to the range of approaches to Physical Theatre.

How to define Physical Theatre – can we question different paradigms? How can the physical audience’s presence shape performance? What is the human body and what is it capable of doing/performing? Why could space be seen as the dominant physical factor?

Solo Performance (Option)

This module seeks to enable students to explore various techniques of producing solo material in order to eventually produce their own 20-minute solo performance piece. During the course of the module, students may analyse the work of several contemporary solo artists and can discover a personal voice and persona as an artist.

Staging the Supernatural (Option)

How do you stage a ghost? In this module, students have the opportunity to explore representations of the supernatural (such as the ghost, the devil, the witch and the vampire) on the stage in a variety of historical contexts. The module aims to investigate the relationship between theatre and the occult through a series of workshops and lectures, and students have the opportunity to discuss the challenges of staging the supernatural from both a practical and theoretical point of view.

Theatre Company (Option)

Delivered through a series of practical workshops, this module centres on the forming of a theatre company. As a way of exploring this process, students are asked to plan, prepare and stage a production. During the module, students will be invited to consider a range of aspects of production, such as funding, marketing and administration. Current Arts Council policy will provide a professional context for the formation of each theatre company’s artistic strategy and business plan, and should help students to determine how these will be implemented in practice.

Students can learn, through direct experience, about roles in a theatre company, such as director, designer, technologist, playwright or performer, and will be given the chance to develop the skills specific to their preferred role. Taken by students at the very end of their degree, this module ends in a showcase of the students’ work, presented to a public audience as part of a degree show festival.

Theatre For Young Audiences (Option)

What part does theatre have to play in the lives of young people today? How do we make such theatre relevant, accessible and alive in a world dominated by interactive video games and reality TV shows? What is the most appropriate setting and subject matter to engage younger audiences in a theatrical experience? These are some of the questions that students will have the opportunity to address by undertaking this module.

Students will have the opportunity to engage in the history of making theatre for young audiences as well as analysing contemporary practice in the area. Students can engage in a series of case studies to assist in the formulation of their own methods of devising a relevant piece of theatre for today’s audience of children and or teenagers.

The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Study Abroad

The growing reputation of the Lincoln School of Fine & Performing Arts has allowed us to develop partnerships with other international institutions. Recently, we have established two exciting ‘study abroad’ affiliations in North America, with the University of Ottawa in Canada and at Drury University in Missouri, USA. These partnerships will enable up to eight drama students per year to participate in an exchange programme, where they will study for a term at one of these partner institutions. These international exchange programmes provide a fantastic opportunity for students to develop life skills, expand the breadth of their education and enhance their employability upon graduation.

Exchange students applying to study outside of Europe do not pay tuition fees at their host university, but continue to pay tuition fees at their home institution.

Participants will usually be responsible for all other costs themselves including travel, accommodation, general living expenses, visas, insurance, vaccinations and administrative fees at the host institution.

Students undertaking an exchange keep their entitlement to UK sources of funding such as student loans and should apply to their awarding body in the normal way, indicating that they will be studying abroad.

If a period of study or placement abroad is a mandatory part of your degree, you may be entitled to extra funding. Students should direct enquiries to their funding body about this.

Students may also be able to apply to their Local Education Authority or the Student Awards Agency for Scotland for further funding to assist with travel expenses. Please contact them for further information.

Performance Opportunities

The Lincoln Company, the University of Lincoln’s student and alumni company, has taken a range of exciting shows to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe for nearly a decade. Our work ranges from new writing to contemporary and experimental performance, but all of our shows are produced and directed by our current and former students who are supported by our in–house technical team.

The Lincoln Company works all year round running shows in repertory, touring regionally, and engaging in national and international festivals. Previous work taken to Edinburgh includes Joe Orton’s 'Loot', David Greig’s 'The cosmonaut’s letter to the woman he once loved in the Soviet Union' and a devised performance, 'Cartography', by graduate company, Flickbook Theatre, which was highly commended by the National Student Drama Festival in 2015.

Placements

Where students have the opportunity to participate in an optional placement in the UK or overseas or are studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport, accommodation and meals costs.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

Students have the opportunity to work and perform in the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, a £6 million, 450-seat professional theatre on the University’s Brayford Pool Campus. The Centre hosts a year-round programme of comedy, dance, drama and musical performance from students and national touring companies, providing an opportunity to get involved with the running of a modern theatre. Facilities include industry-standard studio and rehearsal spaces.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever your area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which you may need in your future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Graduates have the opportunity to develop the skills and knowledge relevant to a variety of roles within the theatre, such as actor, director, playwright, producer, stage manager and technician, as well as in related professions in publishing, marketing, research and academia. Some go on to study further at postgraduate level or undertake qualifications in teaching.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and your meals may be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional you will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay your own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

For students who wish to participate in The Lincoln Company's Edinburgh Festival Fringe performances there are additional costs.

An approximate break down of these costs includes £570 for travel, accommodation and a levy to participate, and an additional £200-£400 to cover the cost of meals and entertainment during the trip. These costs are based on those incurred by individual students during the 2015 performances.

Related Courses

Lincoln’s BA (Hons) Dance degree links the theoretical and academic study of dance through its role in history and modern society with the practical and creative disciplines of technique, choreography, performance and production.
In studying the BA (Hons) Drama and English degree at Lincoln, students will be encouraged to make connections between the subjects, explore key differences between them and also develop critical rigour while questioning conventional assumptions about literature, drama, and the world.
The BA (Hons) English degree at the University of Lincoln explores a lively and varied collection of texts within their historical and theoretical contexts, from Shakespeare and the Renaissance to postcolonialism and postmodernism.
The BA (Hons) Film and Television degree comprises academic study in both film and television, which is complemented by practical and creative projects in television studio production, film and scriptwriting. This programme is 75% theory and 25% practice based.
The BA (Hons) Music degree is a contemporary, industry-focused course led by practising professionals in popular music, audio production, musical theatre and composition. Pathways within the degree enable students to tailor their learning to their own interests and career aspirations.

Introduction

Our BA (Hons) Drama degree puts the creativity of performance at centre stage. With modules that explore a variety of genres and playwrights, the programme aims to prepare students for a range of careers in the theatre and media, both on and off stage.

Students have the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of professional practice and an appreciation of diverse performances. A broad range of optional modules is designed to enable students to inform the direction of their study and explore specialist areas such as acting, musical theatre or stage management.

There are opportunities to participate in a variety of productions, collaborate with other departments and external companies, work with academics on research projects and perform at national and international festivals. Students may decide to join our semi-professional theatre group, The Lincoln Company, and benefit from enhanced opportunities to perform. The highlight of which are our annual performances at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, which will incur additional costs. You may also enjoy an opportunity to study abroad in North America for a term in your second year. Costs relating to a period of study abroad are outlined under the Features tab.

Is This Course Right For Me?

This course is ideal for students who have a passion for the study of Drama as an academic subject. The balance of practical and scholarly approaches is about equal, and a range of optional modules available throughout the degree aim to enable students to tailor the course to suit their interests.

How You Study

The history of performance, tragedy and comedy, and modern European drama are all covered in the first year of study, with the aim of ensuring students have a full understanding of the structures within which the world of theatre operates. In the second and third years, students can choose from a wide range of options including stage combat, teaching drama, physical theatre and theatre for young audiences.

For specific modules, learning can also take place via placements, screenings and viewing theatrical performances. Each student will receive event/performance credits at £90 p/a, which can be used against ticketed performances at the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre. Information on costs relating to placements can be found under the Features tab.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of your degree. However, remember that you are engaging in a full-time degree; so, at the very least, you should expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time and you may undertake assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Are Assessed

As this course aims to develop a wide range of practical and intellectual skills, assessment is varied and includes presentations, written projects, individual and group practical work, projects and portfolios, in addition to academic essays.

There are no formal end-of-year examinations. Throughout the degree, students are assessed through their production of practical and written work.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Methods of Assessment

The way you will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Interviews & Applicant Days

As part of the admissions process, all Drama applicants are required to attend an interview with tutors from the Lincoln School of Fine & Performing Arts. For further information please follow this link: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/dandauditions

What We Look For In Your Application

Students do not need to be a star performer on the stage. They will, however, need plenty of passion and commitment in order to energetically engage with the course, in terms of both practice and scholarship. Expect to work hard, both in and outside of class. A willingness to read, broadly and deeply, is a must for any degree-level course.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of Fine & Performing Arts Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required.

In addition, applicants should have a minimum of three GCSEs at grade C or above (or equivalent), including English.

Mature students with extensive relevant experience will be selected on individual merit.

If you would like further information about entry requirements or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on + 44 (0)1522 886097 or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Academic Skills

This course aims to develop a broad range of skills needed to study successfully at university level. It aims to provide a supportive atmosphere as students adapt to university life and begin to understand the demands of their respective courses. Recognising the different school/college experiences of our students, it is hoped that this course will enable each student to become proficient readers, writers and researchers while providing key transferable skills for their university course and after.

Documentary and Political Theatre (Option)

In recent years, documentary theatre has again come to the fore, creating a new politicised theatrical arena. Part of a specific and rich genealogy, these modern incarnations examine the contemporary world through a dynamic and challenging dramatic form. This module aims to provide students with an opportunity to critically examine a range of plays from the twentieth century. Taking these examples as starting points, students may design and produce their own productions dealing with contemporary issues and news stories. During the course the students can learn more about the relationship between political engagement and the theatrical sphere. They will have the opportunity to examine and workshop a number of plays that seek to present the contemporary world on the stage, using these experiences as they create their own piece.

Histories of Performance

This module aims to introduce students to key moments and movements in the history of the Western theatre. Using a variety of case studies, students can learn how to contextualise each play within its specific historical context to understand the relationship between the play text and the theatrical, social, political, and historical conditions in which it was first performed. Interactive lectures and seminars will include a variety of activities including class discussions, presentations, debates, creative tasks, and performative script readings.

Improvising and Devising

Where do we start to make a piece of new work and why do we need to? What tools and processes are at the disposal of the artist to assist the process of making? What is the history of devised theatre and who are the key practitioners in this area? What is the ethos behind the work of such practitioners as DV8 or Forced Entertainment?

These are some of the questions that will be posed by this module. Improvisation and Devising aims to provide level one students with a foundation in the techniques of improvisation as a tool for the creation of new work. It will seek to engage students in understanding improvisation techniques and devised work as a valuable method of making theatre. Furthermore it will set out to emphasise the importance of process over product when working in a collaborative environment.

Modern European Drama

‘Modern European Drama’ will examine a range of European movements, playwrights and practitioners from the first half of the twentieth century. Using naturalism as a starting point, this module gives students the opportunity to discover some of the most exciting performances of the early twentieth-century theatre. While recognising the continued importance and influence of the naturalist mode, this modules aims to explore plays and movements that challenged, adapted and/or reappropriated this important theatrical genre. Rather than focus exclusively on the written texts, there will be ample opportunity to explore notions of acting space, the moving body, and the cross-generic nature of the modern European stage. The module will examine some key playtexts (both canonical and less well-known) by taking them off the page in practical workshops informed by a programme of interactive seminars.

Reading Performance

This core module at Level One aims to introduce students to a range of theoretical approaches to performance through practice. During the course of the module, students may work on an ensemble production to present for public performance at the end. By engaging with relevant theories by important thinkers, the module introduces some of the pressing critical questions of our time. These may relate to race, class, gender and theories of the body and knowledge-making. With tutor guidance, students may apply that particular theory to the practice of performance-making.

Tragedy and Comedy (Option)

What do we think of as tragedy or comedy? When does something tragic become comic and vice versa? How thin is the line between these genres or has indeed this line broken down? To what extent are previous distinctions still helpful and valid?

This introductory level one module will set out to examine these questions by exploring the origins and developments of these genres beginning with Aristotle’s founding text on Tragedy. It will set out to gain an understanding of the form and structure of the Aristotelian model before going on to explore the ways in which these and other models can be applied to historic and more contemporary texts. Students will have the opportunity to examine various subgenres of tragedy and comedy and learn how to analyse them in their historical, ideological and social contexts as well as engaging with the texts on a practical performance level.

Level 2

Acting the Song (Option)

This is a practical module in which students can explore the techniques of singing and acting song. Students have the opportunity to work on both ensemble numbers and individual numbers, to develop vocal technique, group singing skills, acting approaches to song and character building techniques for musical theatre.

The final performance of both ensemble and solo numbers aims to leave students with the skill to put together a portfolio of song material appropriate for their voice. Assessment will be part practical, and part based on an annotated rehearsal log put together throughout the process. Studying 'The Musical' in Semester A is a prerequisite for 'Acting the Song' in Semester B.

Arts Management (Option)

During this module students have the opportunity to examine and investigate the necessary skills that make up arts management so they are better equipped to develop careers in the arts upon graduation. The module explores various elements of arts management through task- based exercises, group and individual working and guest speakers. The module tutor works with students to identify a relevant case study based on an arts organisation or theatre company.

British Theatre Since 1956 (Option)

This module surveys a range of dramatic works from major British playwrights produced between 1956 - 1996. In lectures and seminars, the work of writers such as Edward Bond, Sarah Kane, Harold Pinter and Martin Crimp will be examined in relation to its social, historical, and political context.

Methods of Practice (Option)

Throughout this module students may develop and deepen their knowledge and practice of delivering dance in a range of practitioner settings. Students have the opportunity to practice, analyse and discuss some of the possible strategies for working in more challenging environments, such as integrated settings and with hard to reach groups. A range of established dance practitioners share their practice with you throughout this module, providing students with an excellent insight to the many varied ways of engaging people in dance.

Performance in Social and Community Contexts (Option)

What do we think of as a community? How many ways are people part of particular communities? What binds communities together and how can particular communities communicate their shared narratives and rituals through a variety of arts-based interventions? How might particular communities benefit from the intervention of drama as a tool for the improvement of individuals and societies in non-traditional theatrical contexts?

In the module, students may address these questions through studio based practical activities examining various social, historical, cultural and political contexts as well as engaging with Case Studies on key practitioners in this area. This module also examines how drama might function in non-traditional theatrical settings, for example: schools, prisons, care homes, on the street or hostels.

Placements (Fine & Performing Arts) (Option)

On completion of their degree, students need to be able to decide how best to employ the skills that they have gained. As well as the more obvious routes within a performing arts degree such as teaching, students need to be aware of what other options may be open to them practically, to explore their route out of the University and on into appropriate employment.

This module encourages students to think beyond the confines of the University, reaching into the wider community to hone their skills for future employment. This module should enable students to examine closely how various arts based organisations work from day to day, whilst at the same time relating that experience to their studies.

Post-colonial Drama (Option)

This optional module at Level Two surveys drama from post-colonial countries such as Australia, Nigeria and Kenya as well as plays addressing the issue of imperialism from within imperialist countries and city states such as the UK and Ancient Athens. How such drama in post-colonial countries forms a recuperative enterprise by countering the rhetoric of imperialism is central to the module.

Practitioners in Practice (Option)

This practice-orientated optional module at level two aims to introduce students to key drama practitioners and theatre-makers who have had and who continue to have a profound influence on contemporary theatre.

What can the theatre practices of Edward Gordon Craig and Vsevolod Meyerhold teach us in our approach to making theatre today? How is their work related to the practice of Forced Entertainment and Tim Etchells, Jerzy Grotowski, Tadeusz Kantor, Joan Littlewood and Peter Brook? In other words, how did we get from Craig and Meyerhold to Littlewood, Grotowski, Brook, Kantor and Forced Entertainment?

Each section in the module will examine a different practitioner. Students may research the historical, cultural and political context of each practitioner’s work and can explore the main principles of the practitioner’s ideas and approaches towards training and theatre practice. Students will then have the opportunity to apply this theory to their own practice in weekly work-in-progress sessions.

Production Skills (Option)

This module aims to provide a basic introduction to the production process of a working theatre. It focuses on three key elements of production: Stage Management, Lighting and Sound.

The module aims to introduce students to a range of technical terms within the production realm and trains students in rudimentary safe working practices conforming to Health & Safety legislation. The module has a vocational strand to it and acts as a training platform for future paid work in the LPAC facility as well as providing excellent routes into the professional world beyond.

Restoration and Melodrama (Level 2) (Option)

Spanning an historical period that begins in 1660 with the restoration of the theatres after the English Civil War and ends in the late nineteenth century, ‘Restoration to Melodrama’ will aim to introduce students to a range of plays and theatrical practices.

Shakespeare and Performance

This module aims to introduce students to the opportunities and challenges of performing Shakespeare’s plays on the contemporary stage.

In a series of lectures, seminars and screenings, students are invited to examine the staging history of a selection of Shakespeare’s plays, exploring how the plays were shaped by their original staging conditions, as well as how the plays have been re-imagined to produce new meanings for contemporary audiences.

Students can learn how to examine the text with an eye to its theatrical potential: they will be asked to work in ensembles to mount a production of an abridged Shakespeare play, taking on roles such as actor, director, designer or stage manager. The process will begin by inviting students to participate in a series of practical workshops designed to help them to develop their vocal and physical acting skills. The module will culminate in a festival of the productions that the students have had the opportunity to create, presented to a public audience.

Stage Combat (Option)

This module aims to introduce the basics of engaging in stage combat and gives students the option of taking the Academy of Performance Combat Basic Three Weapon exam.

Teaching Drama (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to teaching drama in schools and enables them to take part in a mix of practical workshops, interactive seminars and school-based research projects. It promotes the teaching of drama as a subject in its own right and helps students review their own experiences and concepts of drama.

The module will take account of the latest developments in all areas of drama teaching while emphasising recent developments curriculum developments at GCSE, AS, A level and BTEC levels. The module explores how the teaching of drama as a discreet subject links with the National Curriculum at Key Stage 3. The module aims to introduce students to a range of educational and drama-specific strategies enabling them to teach a successful lesson or run a successful workshop.

The Musical (Option)

Why are musicals so popular (and why are some more popular than others)? What can a musical tell us about the culture in which it is produced and staged? How do you apply a critical framework to a study of the musical?

These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this module. In interactive lecture/seminars, students will have the opportunity to investigate how the musical, whilst operating as a mainstream form of popular theatrical entertainment, it similarly can be seen to engage with, challenge or enforce issues of race, gender, class and national identity. The module will provide a historical framework for a study of the musical, and will explore the origins and development of the genre of musical theatre both on the American and the British stage.

Twentieth Century American Drama (Level 2) (Option)

Taught through lectures and seminars, this optional module at level two aims to introduce students to: the historical cultural and theatrical contexts of American drama; issues around the ‘Americanisms’ of American drama; canonical texts; the American avant-garde.

Level 3

Acting For Media (Option)

Acting for the Media’ explores the particular skills and techniques needed to act in front of the camera (film or television) and the microphone (radio / audio). The module is expressly about learning how to act for radio/audio, and for camera. Irrespective of whichever media an actor is working in, there is only either good or bad acting. Basic acting skills around focus, concentration, commitment, imagination are vitally important for film and radio. The ability to study and analyse a script so that the dramatic situation (‘the given circumstances’) and the world of the play are understood is vitally important. Without undergoing this process it is not possible to characterise a role, or to get to grips with subtext, objectives, obstacles and actions, so crucial to successful acting in the media.

The technical skills (‘technique’) required to act for the camera or radio (audio) are different from those needed for acting on stage before a live audience. Stage acting is often in a heightened manner, requiring vocal projection and the defining, in three dimensions, of stage space. Acting for the camera or radio requires careful modulation in order to achieve more intimacy and focus. Working with television and / or film scripts, and with radio drama scripts, achieving the ability to create dramatic effect through look alone, or by the use of voice alone, are essential craft skills that will be learned. As a by-product of the practical work with camera and the microphone, the module also aims to acquaint students with an understanding of production methods for television or film and for radio and audio. The module concludes with a final recording of either a radio or camera script (75% weighting), and a choice of approach to the 2000 word written assessment (25%).

Advanced Acting Technique (Option)

The module is about acting. Seen from the actor/character point of view, it is about actions and objectives, which are what you do in order to get what you need. The module examines various strategies and approaches that are about this, all of which refer, in different ways, to Stanislavski’s ground-breaking work on actions and objectives.

Using scene study as the initial focus for the work, followed by the staging and acting of two scenes, the module aims to teach students how to act better. It aims to refine acting technique, and instil solid, manageable principles about the craft of acting. There is also a directing dimension to the module, insomuch as the scenes have to be interpreted and staged; scene and play analysis is also fundamental to the work of the director. No actor (or director) can begin to act (or direct) successfully without knowing how best to mine the text, wherein most clues are to be found about how to perform the scene, the character and the play.

The first half of the module gives students the opportunity to work on a modern or contemporary naturalistic scene, followed by a classical scene in the second half of the module, either from Shakespeare or another Elizabethan or Jacobean playwright. Scenes are usually performed in duologues. The first part of the module concentrates on introducing acting and scene study techniques, which are then polished and made explicit in the scene work performed. The module concludes with a public performance of the two scenes plus a post-show discussion (75% weighting), plus a written component of 2000 words (25%).

British Theatre as Industry (Option)

Theatre cannot be described or explained by reading scripts. Rather, it is an industry consisting of writers, devisers, producers, directors, actors, designers, managers, agents, publicists, training institutions, buildings, sources of money, communications networks and so on. This module will be useful to students considering arts administration and others interested in discovering how things work.

Contemporary Experimental Performance (Option)

This optional module at level three explores developments in contemporary performance through an investigation of a range of contemporary practitioners whose work has historically grown out of experimental, multi-media and multi-disciplinary approaches, and which has led to a contemporary hybrid form of avant-garde theatre which synthesises and mixes dramatic forms, genres and performance styles.

During the course of the module students will have the opportunity to develop their own small group practical work in studio-based workshops / rehearsal sessions, with the emphasis on exploring new approaches to theatre-making and performance. Each group's work may then be presented for public performance at the end of the module.

Directing (Option)

This optional module at level three aims to introduce students to the practical process of directing for theatre, from researching the script, through casting, auditions and rehearsals to reviewing performances. It is taught through seminars and practical, studio-based classes. Principles and practices developed in class are applied by students to individually-chosen plays.

Dissertation (Fine & Performing Arts)

The Dissertation provides the opportunity for a student to investigate and pursue a fine and performing arts based topic of his or her own choosing, and in more depth than is normally possible in a conventional essay.

Each student will be offered mentorship, though the emphasis will fall on independent learning. Students will be expected to work on their own initiative and to provide clear evidence of their ability to collect, select and evaluate relevant information, which can subsequently be presented in a clear and logical manner, in the form of a 9000 word dissertation.

Multimedia Performance (Option)

This optional module at level three aims to explore multimedia, inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary applications through live theatrical performance, in which students working in groups may make their own multimedia performance which is presented publicly as a final degree show.

Off the Page (Option)

This module is about creativity and places the creative process at its very core. Each student on the module can develop a short play over the course of the semester while at the same time having the opportunity to examine some key skills in playwriting and dramaturgy by discussing and responding to the work of other playwrights. The focus of the module is always on the work itself which evolves week by week into a final draft of a short play.

Physical Theatre (Option)

This practice-orientated optional module at level three aims to introduce students to the range of approaches to Physical Theatre.

How to define Physical Theatre – can we question different paradigms? How can the physical audience’s presence shape performance? What is the human body and what is it capable of doing/performing? Why could space be seen as the dominant physical factor?

Solo Performance (Option)

This module seeks to enable students to explore various techniques of producing solo material in order to eventually produce their own 20-minute solo performance piece. During the course of the module, students may analyse the work of several contemporary solo artists and can discover a personal voice and persona as an artist.

Staging the Supernatural (Option)

How do you stage a ghost? In this module, students have the opportunity to explore representations of the supernatural (such as the ghost, the devil, the witch and the vampire) on the stage in a variety of historical contexts. The module aims to investigate the relationship between theatre and the occult through a series of workshops and lectures, and students have the opportunity to discuss the challenges of staging the supernatural from both a practical and theoretical point of view.

Theatre Company (Option)

Delivered through a series of practical workshops, this module centres on the forming of a theatre company. As a way of exploring this process, students are asked to plan, prepare and stage a production. During the module, students will be invited to consider a range of aspects of production, such as funding, marketing and administration. Current Arts Council policy will provide a professional context for the formation of each theatre company’s artistic strategy and business plan, and should help students to determine how these will be implemented in practice.

Students can learn, through direct experience, about roles in a theatre company, such as director, designer, technologist, playwright or performer, and will be given the chance to develop the skills specific to their preferred role. Taken by students at the very end of their degree, this module ends in a showcase of the students’ work, presented to a public audience as part of a degree show festival.

Theatre For Young Audiences (Option)

What part does theatre have to play in the lives of young people today? How do we make such theatre relevant, accessible and alive in a world dominated by interactive video games and reality TV shows? What is the most appropriate setting and subject matter to engage younger audiences in a theatrical experience? These are some of the questions that students will have the opportunity to address by undertaking this module.

Students will have the opportunity to engage in the history of making theatre for young audiences as well as analysing contemporary practice in the area. Students can engage in a series of case studies to assist in the formulation of their own methods of devising a relevant piece of theatre for today’s audience of children and or teenagers.

The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Study Abroad

The growing reputation of the Lincoln School of Fine & Performing Arts has allowed us to develop partnerships with other international institutions. Recently, we have established two exciting ‘study abroad’ affiliations in North America, with the University of Ottawa in Canada and at Drury University in Missouri, USA. These partnerships will enable up to eight drama students per year to participate in an exchange programme, where they will study for a term at one of these partner institutions. These international exchange programmes provide a fantastic opportunity for students to develop life skills, expand the breadth of their education and enhance their employability upon graduation.

Exchange students applying to study outside of Europe do not pay tuition fees at their host university, but continue to pay tuition fees at their home institution.

Participants will usually be responsible for all other costs themselves including travel, accommodation, general living expenses, visas, insurance, vaccinations and administrative fees at the host institution.

Students undertaking an exchange keep their entitlement to UK sources of funding such as student loans and should apply to their awarding body in the normal way, indicating that they will be studying abroad.

If a period of study or placement abroad is a mandatory part of your degree, you may be entitled to extra funding. Students should direct enquiries to their funding body about this.

Students may also be able to apply to their Local Education Authority or the Student Awards Agency for Scotland for further funding to assist with travel expenses. Please contact them for further information.

Performance Opportunities

The Lincoln Company, the University of Lincoln’s student and alumni company, has taken a range of exciting shows to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe for nearly a decade. Our work ranges from new writing to contemporary and experimental performance, but all of our shows are produced and directed by our current and former students who are supported by our in–house technical team.

The Lincoln Company works all year round running shows in repertory, touring regionally, and engaging in national and international festivals. Previous work taken to Edinburgh includes Joe Orton’s 'Loot', David Greig’s 'The cosmonaut’s letter to the woman he once loved in the Soviet Union' and a devised performance, 'Cartography', by graduate company, Flickbook Theatre, which was highly commended by the National Student Drama Festival in 2015.

Placements

Where students have the opportunity to participate in an optional placement in the UK or overseas or are studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport, accommodation and meals costs.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

Students have the opportunity to work and perform in the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, a £6 million, 450-seat professional theatre on the University’s Brayford Pool Campus. The Centre hosts a year-round programme of comedy, dance, drama and musical performance from students and national touring companies, providing an opportunity to get involved with the running of a modern theatre. Facilities include industry-standard studio and rehearsal spaces.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever your area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which you may need in your future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Graduates can develop the skills and knowledge relevant to a variety of roles within the theatre, such as actor, director, playwright, producer, stage manager and technician, as well as in related professions in publishing, marketing, research and academia. Some go on to study further at postgraduate level or undertake qualifications in teaching.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and your meals may be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional you will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay your own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

For students who wish to participate in The Lincoln Company's Edinburgh Festival Fringe performances there are additional costs.

An approximate break down of these costs includes £570 for travel, accommodation and a levy to participate, and an additional £200-£400 to cover the cost of meals and entertainment during the trip. These costs are based on those incurred by individual students during the 2015 performances.

Related Courses

Lincoln’s BA (Hons) Dance degree links the theoretical and academic study of dance through its role in history and modern society with the practical and creative disciplines of technique, choreography, performance and production.
In studying the BA (Hons) Drama and English degree at Lincoln, students will be encouraged to make connections between the subjects, explore key differences between them and also develop critical rigour while questioning conventional assumptions about literature, drama, and the world.
The BA (Hons) English degree at the University of Lincoln explores a lively and varied collection of texts within their historical and theoretical contexts, from Shakespeare and the Renaissance to postcolonialism and postmodernism.
The BA (Hons) Film and Television degree comprises academic study in both film and television, which is complemented by practical and creative projects in television studio production, film and scriptwriting. This programme is 75% theory and 25% practice based.
The BA (Hons) Music degree is a contemporary, industry-focused course led by practising professionals in popular music, audio production, musical theatre and composition. Pathways within the degree enable students to tailor their learning to their own interests and career aspirations.

Tuition Fees

2016/17 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,000 per level £14,500 per level
Part-time £75 per credit point  
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2017/18 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,000 per level £14,500 per level
Part-time £75 per credit point  
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For further information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Showcase

Drama Showcase

  • Edinburgh Festival

    Since 2008, our resident student and alumni theatre company (The Lincoln Company) has taken shows up to the Edinburgh Festival. 

    A Modernist Event Poster Edinburgh Fringe 2014The Underwater Adventure: Lucy Limpet's Quest for Chippy Cove poster Edinburgh fringe 2014The Baron Conspiracy poster Edinburgh Fringe 2014

    The Edinburgh Festival is the largest, most important and most famous Arts Festival in the world. The world’s media cover it. Hundreds of thousands of people attend it. And the University of Lincoln students perform in it!

     

    Social Media

    BA (Hons) Drama flickr
    The School of Fine and Performing Arts Magazine is our opportunity to share with you some of the remarkable work that takes place in our department, from ground-breaking research, to community projects, to the incredible successes of our students. 

    The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions]