Course Information

BA (Hons)

BA (Hons)

Select year of entry:
3 years School of Fine and Performing Arts Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (or equivalent qualifications) W500 3 years School of Fine and Performing Arts Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points) (or equivalent qualifications) W500

100% of students studying BA (Hons) Dance at Lincoln stated they have been able to contact staff when they needed to, and 94% of students agreed that staff are good at explaining things and have made the subject interesting according to the National Student Survey 2017.

Introduction

Lincoln’s BA (Hons) Dance degree links the theoretical and academic study of dance through its role in history and modern society with the practical and creative disciplines of technique, choreography, performance and production.

Dance is a form of art and emotional expression that can encompass storytelling and social interaction. At Lincoln, this degree aims to prepares students for a wide range of career opportunities, from performance and choreography through to education and community dance.

The practice-based curriculum at Lincoln reflects the vocational needs of professional dancers. Students will have the opportunity to engage with practical and theoretical methods to become a stronger dancer and more dynamic dance maker. There are opportunities for work placements and participation in performances throughout the course. These include collaborations with staff, national and international choreographers and theatre companies. Potential costs of placements are outlined in the Features tab.

How You Study

Lectures and seminars are supplemented by studio and workshop sessions, which aim to form an understanding of both the theoretical and practical aspects of dance. You will also work away from the University on outreach and community based projects, incorporating technical and vocational skills, in order to experience dance as a creative enterprise.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

On each of our course pages you can find information on typical contact hours, modes of delivery and a breakdown of assessment methods. Where available, you will also be able to access a link to Unistats.com, where the latest data on student satisfaction and employability outcomes can be found.

How You Are Assessed

There are no written exams. Most units in the course are assessed through practical performances and written work that takes the form of notebooks, analytical essays, case studies and reflective reports.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Interviews & Applicant Days

As part of the Admissions process, all Dance applicants must attend an interview and audition. For further information please follow this link:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/dandauditions

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of Fine and Performing Arts Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required.

In addition, applicants should have a minimum of three GCSEs at grade C or above, including English, or the equivalent.

We welcome applications from mature students with experience of dance or extensive relevant work experience.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Contemporary Dance, Choreography & Performance (Core)

‘Contemporary Dance, Choreography & Performance Histories’ presents an overview of the development of Western theatrical dance.

This module aims to introduce the major figures and movement theories and provides a contextual examination of these choreographic practices that have underpinned the development of dance in the 20th and 21st century.

Dance Composition (Core)

‘Dance Composition’ furthers the knowledge, performance skills and artistic development initiated in ‘Dance Technique and Anatomy’ in relation to choreography.

The module aims to advance the student's training in creating dance and to increase the student’s potential as a creative practitioner. Essential choreographic rudiments will be addressed in order that students can create their own frameworks for the choreographic process and develop an individual movement ‘palette’.

Dance Improvisation and Reflective Practice (Core)

‘Dance Improvisation and Reflective Practice’ develops further the technical, imaginative and personal discoveries of the level one Composition module.

Dance improvisation is taught as a dance form of structures and freedoms that enable students to develop the skills to research, experiment and respond to a range of stimuli. In addition, students can engage in movement investigation that both furthers and deconstructs their technical dance vocabulary, they develop the skills to compose dance material in the moment in response to their individual movement explorations as well as contributing to small and whole group improvisations. Students are given the opportunity to develop sensitivity and awareness of the self, the group and the emerging composition of a work.

Dance Studies (Core)

This module focuses on the analytical frameworks used to discuss dance practices and choreography. It explores how theoretical concepts may be applied to the practical aspects of performance or dancing and allows students to develop a more critical vocabulary for the discussion of dance. Various concepts ranging from Laban's efforts (1960) to Preston-Dunlop's Nexus of the Strands of the Dance Medium (1998) will help students have a better understanding of how to communicate ideas about choreography and how they may be applied to the work of others, as well as their own.

Dance Technique and Anatomy (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to develop an awareness and understanding of human movement in anatomical, spatial and qualitative terms, applying this understanding to different dance techniques (e.g. Graham, Cohan, Humphrey, Cunningham, Release Technique and Contemporary Jazz). They may also learn how to work safely and care for their bodies by becoming familiar with safe dance practice and injury prevention.

Screen Dance (Core)

Screen Dance gives students the opportunity to explore choreography off the stage and onto the screen. This module focuses on the creation of a dance work for video, exploring the use of the camera, editing as choreography and the transformation of movement through digital video technology. The module gives students the opportunity to storyboard, shoot and edit a short dance film, as well as document this process in a production dossier. Students can work in production teams to achieve a final video which explores choreography in a new and exciting way.

Study Skills For Dance (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to a broad range of skills needed to study dance successfully at university level. It aims to provide a supportive atmosphere as students adapt to university life and begin to understand the demands of their respective courses. It is hoped that this course will enable each student to become proficient readers, writers and researchers while providing key transferrable skills for their university course and after.

Level 2

Applied Dance Techniques (Core)

In Applied Dance Technique students may continue to practice and refine their contemporary dance technique, and combined with further somatic practices will deepen their body awareness and body consciousness in movement. This module aims to introduce somatic practices such as Body-Mind Centring, Ideokinesis and Bartinieff Movement Fundamentals. Furthermore, students are expected to apply these approaches to second dance technique such as South Asian Dance.

Arts Management (Option)

During this module students have the opportunity to examine and investigate the necessary skills that make up arts management so they are better equipped to develop careers in the arts upon graduation. The module explores various elements of arts management through task- based exercises, group and individual working and guest speakers. The module tutor works with students to identify a relevant case study based on an arts organisation or theatre company.

Conceptual Choreography (Core)

Conceptual Choreography is a practice based studio research that aims to enable students to respond creatively and artistically to identity theories by exploring and developing practically some seminal performances that have influenced contemporary choreography, performance and live art. During the course of this module, students may work towards the creation of a performative event by adopting and adapting relevant conceptual frameworks. Students are introduced and encouraged to use choreographic strategies that extend beyond dance (such as performance lectures, flash mobs, participatory events, one-to-one performances, photographic exhibitions, video installations, body art etc)

Contact Improvisation: An Ongoing Research Lab (Core)

‘Contact Improvisation: An Ongoing Research Lab’ develops further the technical, imaginative and personal discoveries of the level one ‘Dance Improvisation and Reflective Practice’ module.

Contact Improvisation is based on the communication between two or more bodies established through physical contact. Through this the student has the opportunity to develop skills to establish and maintain a physical dialogue through an ever changing point of physical contact. Consequently, the student can develop a refined experiential awareness of the physical laws of motion: gravity, inertia and momentum. Students have the opportunity to learn to give and take each other’s weight, direct impulses through the body, initiate movement and direct mass. The student can develop a responsive physical tone which is free from excess tension whilst being able to attain a sense of internal architecture, structure and form.

Dance Technique and Somatics (Core)

In ‘Dance Technique and Somatics’ students may build on their technical and anatomical understanding from level one through the introduction of somatic practices.

The purpose of introducing somatic practices into the second year of study is to help students become mindful of how the body is used, and to uncover thought process, attitudes and training practices that can both hinder and liberate their potential as dancers. The application of somatics facilitates a deeper understanding of the body and its systems in relation to its environment.

Digital Performance (Core)

This module focuses on the interdisciplinary field of digital performance. “We define the term 'digital performance' broadly to include all performance works where computer technologies play a key role rather than a subsidiary one in content, techniques, aesthetics or delivery forms” (Dixon, 2007, p3).

It examines the intersection of digital media and performance in various contexts, such as interactive media on stage, biosensors and the body in performance, and social media and performance opportunities. By working with various digital technologies students can engage and explore practically how to make performance using these tools and new technologies.

Placements (Fine & Performing Arts) (Option)

On completion of their degree, students need to be able to decide how best to employ the skills that they have gained. As well as the more obvious routes within a performing arts degree such as teaching, students need to be aware of what other options may be open to them practically, to explore their route out of the University and on into appropriate employment.

This module encourages students to think beyond the confines of the University, reaching into the wider community to hone their skills for future employment. This module should enable students to examine closely how various arts based organisations work from day to day, whilst at the same time relating that experience to their studies.

Production Skills (Option)

This module aims to provide a basic introduction to the production process of a working theatre. It focuses on three key elements of production: Stage Management, Lighting and Sound.

The module aims to introduce students to a range of technical terms within the production realm and trains students in rudimentary safe working practices conforming to Health & Safety legislation. The module has a vocational strand to it and acts as a training platform for future paid work in the LPAC facility as well as providing excellent routes into the professional world beyond.

Revisiting Repertory (Option)

In “Revisiting Repertory”, students have the opportunity to practically experience the creative process, study and interpret a repertory piece by seminal choreographers of the 20th and 21st century. The module creates an environment where students can investigate how ideas enter, interrupt, disrupt and interlace themselves with the writings/creations of others. The students can practically experience the process of the (re) creation of a conceptual reappropriation and remaking of a performance evening. This module provides opportunities for students to engage with the processes necessary for the realisation of performed events, thus simulating the demands of professional practice in making and delivering the work created, in order to prepare students for the greater autonomy expected at level three.

Study Abroad Dance (Option)

The Erasmus Exchange Programme is an optional module of study for the award of the BA Dance Degree. As part of the three-year course, some students may study for the duration of Semester B at the Norwegian College of Dance. The modules for study in Semester B are all practice based modules.

The Erasmus Exchange enables participants to spend a semester at a Norwegian institution, to experience other approaches to the study of their own and others’ culture and history, and to be enriched by the experience of living in another culture.

The Dance Practitioner in Context (Option)

Throughout this module students may develop and deepen their knowledge and practice of delivering dance in a range of practitioner settings. Students have the opportunity to practice, analyse and discuss some of the possible strategies for working in more challenging environments, such as integrated settings and with hard to reach groups. A range of established dance practitioners share their practice with you throughout this module, providing students with an excellent insight to the many varied ways of engaging people in dance.

The Performance of Identity (Core)

This module utilises the paradigm of performance and the theatrical metaphor in order to examine sociological and philosophical underpinnings around the construction of the self and identity. It locates identity theories into artistic practices of the late 20th and 21st century and gives the students an introductory theoretical background to work as a conceptual choreographer.

Level 3

Body in Performance: Theory and Practice (Core)

The module interrogates the concept of the 'body' as analysed in philosophy, psychoanalysis, anthropology, sociology and cultural studies. Students have the opportunity to investigate the potentials of the body and its meanings. This module provides the opportunity for students to engage in philosophical research, which has both theoretical and practical outcomes and stresses the interdependence of these modes of research.

Lectures and seminars introduce philosophical concepts of subjectivity and embodiment in the context of artistic movements concerned with rethinking the nature of the body, movement and identity. This provides students with a sense of historical context, and the opportunity to articulate their own practice within wider discourses on the performing body. The module will investigate the panoply of relationships connecting texts, bodies and processes in dance practice. This investigation will manifest in a work of live and performance art that strives to break aesthetic moulds, whilst embracing technical and choreographic approaches.

Choreography: Locating Dance (Core)

In ‘Choreography Three: Locating Dance’ students apply choreographic concepts to site-specific environments and non-theatre venues in the local community (e.g. art galleries, outdoors and village halls) and other spaces around the university campus.

The module introduces opportunities offered by the concepts of site-based performance. Specific skills concerned with site-specific work are explored, such as reading sites from analytical, emotional, functional, contextual and historical perspectives.
The module culminates in production projects that require the re-working of site-specific performances for the theatre space. This pedagogically challenging task requires the student to synthesise all the skills learned on the module and prior choreographic modules to date

Dance Technique and Performance (Core)

In ‘Dance Technique and Performance’ students have the opportunity to develop and explore a working practice of the technical skills and knowledge required to further an advanced understanding of dance technique.

The module aims to equip the student with opportunities to pull together all of the learning strands into the creation of a performance. Technique and Performance aims to demonstrate an understanding of artistic communication through acquisition and mastery of technical dance and presentation skills.

The module aims to reveal a student’s individuality and creativity in technical performance, displaying personalised style, technical proficiency in placement, strength and flexibility, and centring.

Dissertation (Dance) (Core)

This module provides a structure in which students can devise, plan, research, draft and complete a dissertation in a subject of their choosing in the field of dance studies. Although the dissertation is closely supervised, students are expected to work on their own initiative and to provide clear evidence of their ability to collect, select and evaluate relevant information, which can subsequently be presented in a clear and logical manner.

Within this research there may be a practical element, and it is up to the student, as the researcher, to decide if this practical work will be assessed as part of the final dissertation. This negotiated learning allows the student to take on an active role as a researcher that is found within the field of dance and performance. Not only does this aim to prepare students for post-graduate study, but also allows students to build a portfolio of practice for when they finish their degrees.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Industry Links

Fine and performing arts courses at Lincoln are delivered by a dedicated team of academic staff who have excellent industry links and considerable experience as practitioners and researchers in the arts. There are opportunities to work with guest lecturers and choreographers to create professional performance work.

Performance Opportunities

Students have the opportunity to work with choreographers and to perform works choreographed by international artists.

Performance Credits

Each student will receive event/performance credits at £90 p/a, which can be used against ticketed performances at the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre.

Placements

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

Students can work and perform in the University’s on-campus Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, a £6 million, 450-seat professional theatre with industry-standard studio spaces. The Centre, part of a busy arts community, coordinates a year-round programme of public events, hosting professional performances alongside student productions. It offers students a glimpse into the running of a thriving, modern theatre.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Dance graduates are well placed for a wide variety of careers including performance artist and dancer, as well as roles in education, workshop leadership and arts management.

90% of Lincoln Dance graduates are in work or further study within six months of finishing the course according to the latest (2014/15) Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

Our BA (Hons) Drama and Theatre degree puts the creativity of performance at centre stage and aims to prepare students for a range of careers in the theatre and media, both on and off stage.

Introduction

The practice-based curriculum on the BA (Hons) Dance degree at Lincoln reflects the vocational needs of professional dancers. Students will have the opportunity to engage with practical and theoretical methods to become stronger dancers and more dynamic dance makers. A variety of modules offers students the opportunity to develop a range of transferable skills in preparation for their future career. Dance training at Lincoln focuses on contemporary techniques and works to develop and nurture creative practice.

This degree is founded in professional practice and we are proud to be part of a vibrant community of academics and professional artists. The department has an impressive array of associate lecturers who are currently working in the industry nationally and internationally. Students also have the opportunity to benefit from visiting artists and participate in professional company workshops.

There are opportunities for work placements and participation in performances throughout the course. These include collaborations with staff, national and international choreographers and theatre companies. Potential costs of placements are outlined in the Features tab.

How You Study

Initially the course focuses on the fundamentals of dance composition, progressing to expand bodily awareness through other areas of dance, such as dance technique, somatic practices and contact improvisation.

There is the option to undertake a work placement which offers the opportunity to gain experience and make industry contacts. Please note that students are responsible for any travel, accommodation or general living costs during their work placement. Students have the option of studying at our partner institution in Norway for one term during the second year to experience international approaches to dance training.

Lectures and seminars are supplemented by studio and workshop sessions, which aim to form an understanding of both the theoretical and practical aspects of dance. You will also work away from the University on outreach and community based projects, incorporating technical and vocational skills, in order to experience dance as a creative enterprise.

Contact Hours

Level 1:

At level one students will typically have around 17 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 11 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 1 hour of tutorial time
  • 2 hours in seminars
  • 3 hours in lectures


Level 2:

At level two students will typically have around 17 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 12 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 1 hour of tutorial time
  • 3 hours in seminars
  • 1 hours in lectures


Level 3:

At level three students will typically have around 14 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 12 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 1 hour of tutorial time
  • 1 hour in lectures


Overall Workload and Independent Study

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. Students’ overall workload will consist of their scheduled contact hours combined with independent study. The expected level of independent study is detailed below.

Level 1:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 344.7
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 28%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 72%


Level 2:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 358
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 29%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 71%


Level 3:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 303.6
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 24%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 76%

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

On each of our course pages you can find information on typical contact hours, modes of delivery and a breakdown of assessment methods. Where available, you will also be able to access a link to Unistats.com, where the latest data on student satisfaction and employability outcomes can be found.

How You Are Assessed

There are no written exams. Most units in the course are assessed through practical performances and written work that takes the form of notebooks, analytical essays, case studies and reflective reports.

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

Assessment Breakdown

Level 1:

Coursework: 52.5%
Practical exams: 47.5%
Written exams: 0%

Level 2:

Coursework: 50%
Practical exams: 50%
Written exams: 0%

Level 3:

Coursework: 42.5%
Practical exams: 57.5%
Written exams: 0%

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Interviews & Applicant Days

As part of the Admissions process, all Dance applicants must attend an interview and audition. For further information please follow this link:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/dandauditions

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of Fine and Performing Arts Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above.

In addition, applicants should have a minimum of three GCSEs at grade C or above, including English, or the equivalent.

We welcome applications from mature students with experience of dance or extensive relevant work experience.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Contemporary Dance, Choreography & Performance (Core)

‘Contemporary Dance, Choreography & Performance Histories’ presents an overview of the development of Western theatrical dance.

This module aims to introduce the major figures and movement theories and provides a contextual examination of these choreographic practices that have underpinned the development of dance in the 20th and 21st century.

Dance Composition (Core)

‘Dance Composition’ furthers the knowledge, performance skills and artistic development initiated in ‘Dance Technique and Anatomy’ in relation to choreography.

The module aims to advance the student's training in creating dance and to increase the student’s potential as a creative practitioner. Essential choreographic rudiments will be addressed in order that students can create their own frameworks for the choreographic process and develop an individual movement ‘palette’.

Dance Improvisation and Reflective Practice (Core)

‘Dance Improvisation and Reflective Practice’ develops further the technical, imaginative and personal discoveries of the level one Composition module.

Dance improvisation is taught as a dance form of structures and freedoms that enable students to develop the skills to research, experiment and respond to a range of stimuli. In addition, students can engage in movement investigation that both furthers and deconstructs their technical dance vocabulary, they develop the skills to compose dance material in the moment in response to their individual movement explorations as well as contributing to small and whole group improvisations. Students are given the opportunity to develop sensitivity and awareness of the self, the group and the emerging composition of a work.

Dance Studies (Core)

This module focuses on the analytical frameworks used to discuss dance practices and choreography. It explores how theoretical concepts may be applied to the practical aspects of performance or dancing and allows students to develop a more critical vocabulary for the discussion of dance. Various concepts ranging from Laban's efforts (1960) to Preston-Dunlop's Nexus of the Strands of the Dance Medium (1998) will help students have a better understanding of how to communicate ideas about choreography and how they may be applied to the work of others, as well as their own.

Dance Technique and Anatomy (Core)

In this module students will have the opportunity to develop an awareness and understanding of human movement in anatomical, spatial and qualitative terms, applying this understanding to different dance techniques (e.g. Graham, Cohan, Humphrey, Cunningham, Release Technique and Contemporary Jazz). They may also learn how to work safely and care for their bodies by becoming familiar with safe dance practice and injury prevention.

Screen Dance (Core)

Screen Dance gives students the opportunity to explore choreography off the stage and onto the screen. This module focuses on the creation of a dance work for video, exploring the use of the camera, editing as choreography and the transformation of movement through digital video technology. The module gives students the opportunity to storyboard, shoot and edit a short dance film, as well as document this process in a production dossier. Students can work in production teams to achieve a final video which explores choreography in a new and exciting way.

Study Skills For Dance (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to a broad range of skills needed to study dance successfully at university level. It aims to provide a supportive atmosphere as students adapt to university life and begin to understand the demands of their respective courses. It is hoped that this course will enable each student to become proficient readers, writers and researchers while providing key transferrable skills for their university course and after.

Level 2

Applied Dance Techniques (Core)

In Applied Dance Technique students may continue to practice and refine their contemporary dance technique, and combined with further somatic practices will deepen their body awareness and body consciousness in movement. This module aims to introduce somatic practices such as Body-Mind Centring, Ideokinesis and Bartinieff Movement Fundamentals. Furthermore, students are expected to apply these approaches to second dance technique such as South Asian Dance.

Arts Management (Option)

During this module students have the opportunity to examine and investigate the necessary skills that make up arts management so they are better equipped to develop careers in the arts upon graduation. The module explores various elements of arts management through task- based exercises, group and individual working and guest speakers. The module tutor works with students to identify a relevant case study based on an arts organisation or theatre company.

Conceptual Choreography (Core)

Conceptual Choreography is a practice based studio research that aims to enable students to respond creatively and artistically to identity theories by exploring and developing practically some seminal performances that have influenced contemporary choreography, performance and live art. During the course of this module, students may work towards the creation of a performative event by adopting and adapting relevant conceptual frameworks. Students are introduced and encouraged to use choreographic strategies that extend beyond dance (such as performance lectures, flash mobs, participatory events, one-to-one performances, photographic exhibitions, video installations, body art etc)

Contact Improvisation: An Ongoing Research Lab (Core)

‘Contact Improvisation: An Ongoing Research Lab’ develops further the technical, imaginative and personal discoveries of the level one ‘Dance Improvisation and Reflective Practice’ module.

Contact Improvisation is based on the communication between two or more bodies established through physical contact. Through this the student has the opportunity to develop skills to establish and maintain a physical dialogue through an ever changing point of physical contact. Consequently, the student can develop a refined experiential awareness of the physical laws of motion: gravity, inertia and momentum. Students have the opportunity to learn to give and take each other’s weight, direct impulses through the body, initiate movement and direct mass. The student can develop a responsive physical tone which is free from excess tension whilst being able to attain a sense of internal architecture, structure and form.

Dance Technique and Somatics (Core)

In ‘Dance Technique and Somatics’ students may build on their technical and anatomical understanding from level one through the introduction of somatic practices.

The purpose of introducing somatic practices into the second year of study is to help students become mindful of how the body is used, and to uncover thought process, attitudes and training practices that can both hinder and liberate their potential as dancers. The application of somatics facilitates a deeper understanding of the body and its systems in relation to its environment.

Digital Performance (Core)

This module focuses on the interdisciplinary field of digital performance. “We define the term 'digital performance' broadly to include all performance works where computer technologies play a key role rather than a subsidiary one in content, techniques, aesthetics or delivery forms” (Dixon, 2007, p3).

It examines the intersection of digital media and performance in various contexts, such as interactive media on stage, biosensors and the body in performance, and social media and performance opportunities. By working with various digital technologies students can engage and explore practically how to make performance using these tools and new technologies.

Placements (Fine & Performing Arts) (Option)

On completion of their degree, students need to be able to decide how best to employ the skills that they have gained. As well as the more obvious routes within a performing arts degree such as teaching, students need to be aware of what other options may be open to them practically, to explore their route out of the University and on into appropriate employment.

This module encourages students to think beyond the confines of the University, reaching into the wider community to hone their skills for future employment. This module should enable students to examine closely how various arts based organisations work from day to day, whilst at the same time relating that experience to their studies.

Production Skills (Option)

This module aims to provide a basic introduction to the production process of a working theatre. It focuses on three key elements of production: Stage Management, Lighting and Sound.

The module aims to introduce students to a range of technical terms within the production realm and trains students in rudimentary safe working practices conforming to Health & Safety legislation. The module has a vocational strand to it and acts as a training platform for future paid work in the LPAC facility as well as providing excellent routes into the professional world beyond.

Revisiting Repertory (Option)

In “Revisiting Repertory”, students have the opportunity to practically experience the creative process, study and interpret a repertory piece by seminal choreographers of the 20th and 21st century. The module creates an environment where students can investigate how ideas enter, interrupt, disrupt and interlace themselves with the writings/creations of others. The students can practically experience the process of the (re) creation of a conceptual reappropriation and remaking of a performance evening. This module provides opportunities for students to engage with the processes necessary for the realisation of performed events, thus simulating the demands of professional practice in making and delivering the work created, in order to prepare students for the greater autonomy expected at level three.

Study Abroad Dance (Option)

The Erasmus Exchange Programme is an optional module of study for the award of the BA Dance Degree. As part of the three-year course, some students may study for the duration of Semester B at the Norwegian College of Dance. The modules for study in Semester B are all practice based modules.

The Erasmus Exchange enables participants to spend a semester at a Norwegian institution, to experience other approaches to the study of their own and others’ culture and history and the opportunity to experience living in another culture.

The Dance Practitioner in Context (Option)

Throughout this module students may develop and deepen their knowledge and practice of delivering dance in a range of practitioner settings. Students have the opportunity to practice, analyse and discuss some of the possible strategies for working in more challenging environments, such as integrated settings and with hard to reach groups. A range of established dance practitioners share their practice with you throughout this module, providing students with an excellent insight to the many varied ways of engaging people in dance.

The Performance of Identity (Core)

This module utilises the paradigm of performance and the theatrical metaphor in order to examine sociological and philosophical underpinnings around the construction of the self and identity. It locates identity theories into artistic practices of the late 20th and 21st century and gives the students an introductory theoretical background to work as a conceptual choreographer.

Level 3

Body in Performance: Theory and Practice (Core)

The module interrogates the concept of the 'body' as analysed in philosophy, psychoanalysis, anthropology, sociology and cultural studies. Students have the opportunity to investigate the potentials of the body and its meanings. This module provides the opportunity for students to engage in philosophical research, which has both theoretical and practical outcomes and stresses the interdependence of these modes of research.

Lectures and seminars introduce philosophical concepts of subjectivity and embodiment in the context of artistic movements concerned with rethinking the nature of the body, movement and identity. This provides students with a sense of historical context, and the opportunity to articulate their own practice within wider discourses on the performing body. The module will investigate the panoply of relationships connecting texts, bodies and processes in dance practice. This investigation will manifest in a work of live and performance art that strives to break aesthetic moulds, whilst embracing technical and choreographic approaches.

Choreography: Locating Dance (Core)

In ‘Choreography Three: Locating Dance’ students apply choreographic concepts to site-specific environments and non-theatre venues in the local community (e.g. art galleries, outdoors and village halls) and other spaces around the university campus.

The module introduces opportunities offered by the concepts of site-based performance. Specific skills concerned with site-specific work are explored, such as reading sites from analytical, emotional, functional, contextual and historical perspectives.
The module culminates in production projects that require the re-working of site-specific performances for the theatre space. This pedagogically challenging task requires the student to synthesise all the skills learned on the module and prior choreographic modules to date

Dance Technique and Performance (Core)

In ‘Dance Technique and Performance’ students have the opportunity to develop and explore a working practice of the technical skills and knowledge required to further an advanced understanding of dance technique.

The module aims to equip the student with opportunities to pull together all of the learning strands into the creation of a performance. Technique and Performance aims to demonstrate an understanding of artistic communication through acquisition and mastery of technical dance and presentation skills.

The module aims to reveal a student’s individuality and creativity in technical performance, displaying personalised style, technical proficiency in placement, strength and flexibility, and centring.

Dissertation (Dance) (Core)

This module provides a structure in which students can devise, plan, research, draft and complete a dissertation in a subject of their choosing in the field of dance studies. Although the dissertation is closely supervised, students are expected to work on their own initiative and to provide clear evidence of their ability to collect, select and evaluate relevant information, which can subsequently be presented in a clear and logical manner.

Within this research there may be a practical element, and it is up to the student, as the researcher, to decide if this practical work will be assessed as part of the final dissertation. This negotiated learning allows the student to take on an active role as a researcher that is found within the field of dance and performance. Not only does this aim to prepare students for post-graduate study, but also allows students to build a portfolio of practice for when they finish their degrees.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Industry Links

Fine and performing arts courses at Lincoln are delivered by a dedicated team of academic staff who have excellent industry links and considerable experience as practitioners and researchers in the arts. There are opportunities to work with guest lecturers and choreographers to create professional performance work.

Performance Opportunities

Opportunities for participation in performances include collaborations with staff, as well as with national and international choreographers and theatre companies. Students can audition for The Lincoln Company which has taken shows to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Regular opportunities to perform are available through our extra-curricular performance company The Lincoln Dance Collective and our third-year performance company, which both undertake an annual national tour.

Performance Credits

Each student will receive event/performance credits at £90 p/a, which can be used against ticketed performances at the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre.

Placements

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

Students can work and perform in the University’s on-campus Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, a £6 million, 450-seat professional theatre with industry-standard studio spaces. The Centre, part of a busy arts community, hosts professional performances alongside student productions.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

Dance graduates are well-placed for a wide variety of careers, including performance, choreography, community arts leadership, education and arts management.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

Our BA (Hons) Drama and Theatre degree puts the creativity of performance at centre stage and aims to prepare students for a range of careers in the theatre and media, both on and off stage.

Tuition Fees

2017/18UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,500 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

In 2017/18, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

In 2018/19, fees may increase in line with Government Policy. We will update this information when fees for 2018/19 are finalised.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Showcase

Student Work

  • Facilities

    • On-campus Performing Arts Centre
    • 450-seat theatre
    • Specialist studio spaces
    • Programme of public events
    • Professional performances alongside student productions.

    The school of Fine and Performing Arts facilities give students the opportunity to work and perform in the University’s on-campus Lincoln Performing Arts Centre, 450-seat theatre with specialist studio spaces. The Centre, part of a busy arts community, coordinates a year-round programme of public events, hosting professional performances alongside student productions. It can offer students a glimpse into the running of a thriving, modern performance venue.

    LPAC Performing Arts Centre


    The Lincoln Dance Collective

    The Lincoln Dance Collective was established in an effort to bridge the gap between the practical and theoretical studies. It can provide students with experience of a professional dance company. Students audition to be part of the Collective following a weekly rehearsal period.

    Choreography and Rehearsals

    As a member of the Collective, students have the opportunity to rehearse and create pieces of repertoire with external choreographers.

    The repertoire changes each year and the choreographers are chosen through our partnership with Dance4 (the national dance hub for the East Midlands).

    Performances and Touring

    The Collective tours as far afield as London in the Winter and Spring of each year. Alongside touring, members learn to deliver educational workshops in a range of FE, Secondary and Primary school settings.

    Additional costs may apply for those who choose to partake in trips run by the Lincoln Collective. Students will be made aware of such costs by the Lincoln Collective once at the University. This is an extra-curricular activity, and as such, attendance on these trips will not impact upon your final award on the BA (Hons) Dance programme.


    Social Media

    BA (Hons) Dance on Facebook View more performances on flickr
    The School of Fine and Performing Arts Magazine is our opportunity to share with you some of the remarkable work that takes place in our department, from ground-breaking research, to community projects, to the incredible successes of our students. 

    The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions].