BA (Hons) Classical Studies

The Course

BA (Hons) Classical Studies at Lincoln offers students the opportunity to become part of a vibrant academic community in a genuine Roman city.

Lincoln was founded as Lindum Colonia, a Roman colony, and has a wealth of Roman history and heritage above and below ground. Traffic still travels through its third-century gate, the Newport Arch. The University of Lincoln sits on the Brayford Pool, a Roman inland port connected to the River Trent by a Roman canal, the Fossdyke.

Scholars at Lincoln research and teach in exciting areas, from the creation and reception of ancient art and culture to literacy in Late Antiquity, from the making of Roman London to the life and legacy of Constantine, from the foundation of Roman London to the fall of Constantinople. We aim to share our research and support students as they access specialist resources for their own research, including the amazing artefacts in the city's The Collection archaeological museum, to which we have privileged access.

Classical Studies explore a range of subjects that reflect the variety and richness of research and teaching within the School of History and Heritage and the College of Arts, with expertise in history and archaeology, the history of art and architecture, literature and cultural studies, visual and material culture, philosophy and gender studies, cultural and digital heritage, and conservation.

The first year is designed to provide solid foundations in the study of the Classical Civilisation, focusing on the Mediterranean and Near East from 1000 BC to AD 600. Students are introduced to written and archaeological evidence, ancient art and architecture, Latin language and literature, and receive instruction in critical thinking and writing. Together these modules aim to develop the analytical skills that are required to undertake more advanced work.

In the second and third years, a variety of optional modules are available based on the research specialisms of our academic team. In the third year, students produce an extended piece of independent research on a topic of their choice.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Critical Thinking and Writing (Core)
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Critical Thinking and Writing (Core)

This module aims to equip students with the skills necessary to communicate their learning in an academic environment, and also supports students in adjusting to the demands of higher education. The core objective of the module is to develop students’ critical thinking and writing skills.

Elementary Latin I (Option)
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Elementary Latin I (Option)

A basic language course designed to enable students to read simple Latin texts. Students who enter having taken a Latin A-level will instead study the module 'The Medieval World'.

Empire and After: Colonialism and its Consequences (Option)
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Empire and After: Colonialism and its Consequences (Option)

This module aims to provide students with a survey of imperial histories, at the same time as introducing some key conceptual and analytical tools for understanding the history of colonialism in a variety of pre-modern and modern contexts, from the perspectives of both colonizers and colonized.

Introduction to Visual and Material Culture (Option)
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Introduction to Visual and Material Culture (Option)

This module is designed as an introduction to visual and material culture, embracing the history of art and architecture, historical archaeology, and the conservation of historical buildings. It aims to enable students to interrogate visual and material objects throughout the past and to understand their functions and possible meanings of visual and material objects as primary sources.

The Greek World (Core)
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The Greek World (Core)

An introduction to archaic and classical Greek history, literature, philosophy, art and archaeology, structured around the research specialisms of the module teaching team.

The Historian’s Craft (Core)
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The Historian’s Craft (Core)

This module focuses on developing students’ research skills in history and their understanding of research as a process of inquiry. The module aims to deepen skills developed in the first term, such as essay writing in history and information literacy, by working alongside staff from the School in analysing primary and secondary sources relating to specific approaches to History.

The Medieval World (Option)
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The Medieval World (Option)

This module offers an introduction to the sources, approaches and methods necessary for the study of the medieval world. Lectures provide a survey of key moments in medieval history from 300-1500, structured around the research specialisms of the module teaching team. The module focuses on issues of religion and power in the Middle Ages, while there is a strong methodological focus on the materiality of the medieval period.

The Roman World (Core)
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The Roman World (Core)

An introduction to Roman history, covering the Regal and Republican periods.

Art and Power: Projecting Authority in the Renaissance World (Option)
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Art and Power: Projecting Authority in the Renaissance World (Option)

Renaissance monarchs often employed artistic display to project royal authority. Ruling elites commissioned pieces of art not only for the embellishment of their residences, but also as a suitable vehicle to display authority. Kings and Queens commissioned tapestries, sculptures, royal palaces, or lavishly decorated printed books that narrated their achievements and omitted their failures. This module examines the diverse ways rulers and their entourage imagined and created an image of kingship through the visual arts.

Britons and Romans, 100 BC-AD 450 (Option)
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Britons and Romans, 100 BC-AD 450 (Option)

This course will examine how and why the culture of Britain changed in the period of increasing contact with, and eventual incorporation into, the Roman Empire. Examining the key material, behavioural, ideological, and structural changes to society in the period c. 100 BC to AD 450, it will question to what degree each aspect was a wholesale incorporation of ‘foreign’ ideas, technologies, and goods, a local interpretation and adoption of these importations into an existing social system, or a local creation that was distinctly Romano-British, if often termed ‘Roman’.

Classics in Context (Core)
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Classics in Context (Core)

Close reading of a single Latin text in translation, developing as a group a commentary to place the chosen work it in its many contexts.

Destroying Art: Iconoclasm through History (Option)
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Destroying Art: Iconoclasm through History (Option)

One of the clearest indications that art matters is when political regimes, religious groups, and individuals go to great lengths to destroy it. This module examines popular acts and official policies of iconoclasm, primarily in Europe and the Middle East, from antiquity to the present. Special attention will be paid to image debates in the formative periods of Jewish, Christian, and Islamic art, and to the systematic destruction of art in the Protestant Reformation, the French Revolution, and in Nazi Germany.

Digital Heritage (Option)
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Digital Heritage (Option)

The cultural heritage sector increasingly offers opportunities for application of these rapidly developing digital technologies, as a communication, research and recording tool. This module offers the opportunity for students to become familiar with some of these advanced recording techniques for the study and recording of objects.

Dissertations and Beyond (Core)
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Dissertations and Beyond (Core)

This module aims to provide a framework for career planning and preparing for the world of work. It also provides the opportunity for students to develop the management skills needed for independent study which is a compulsory part of level three of the programme.

Elementary Greek I (Option)
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Elementary Greek I (Option)

An introductory language course, focusing on grammar and vocabulary acquisition with the aim of enabling students to read simple Greek texts.

Imperial Cities of the Early Modern World. (Option)
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Imperial Cities of the Early Modern World. (Option)

One of the ways in which early modern monarchs and rulers legitimised their authority and projected their power was through architecture and urban design. In this period capital cities across Europe, America and Asia were embellished with architecture and urban design inspired by Renaissance ideals of social order. This module examines the ways rulers imagined and built imperial a number of capital cities across Europe, America and Asia.

Intermediate Latin I (Option)
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Intermediate Latin I (Option)

This module offers further study of Latin grammar and syntax, enabling students the opportunity to engage more fully with a wider range of Latin sources. Students can read from a variety of classical Latin texts, including historiography, novels, poetry, inscriptions, and laws.

Introduction to Exhibitions, Curatorship and Curatorial Practices (Option)
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Introduction to Exhibitions, Curatorship and Curatorial Practices (Option)

This module introduces students to the understanding of exhibitions and curatorial practices. Following an introduction on the history of collections and museums, the course will explore the many issues related to the display of art and objects. It combines the study of theoretical approaches and the analysis of relevant case studies, and considers topics related to audiences for museums and exhibitions, the presentation and explanation of artefacts and artworks, and the new opportunities offered by digital technologies.

Renaissances (Option)
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Renaissances (Option)

This module explores cultural renaissances in Europe and beyond. It will examine the survival, imitation and revival of classical models from ancient Greece and Rome from late antiquity to the modern period. While our geographical focus will be the Mediterranean and northern Europe, we will also investigate cultures and cultural production influenced by European renaissances, for example in colonial Latin America, Africa and Asia. The first archaeological excavations in the eighteenth century inspired an interest in ancient ruins and a series of nineteenth-century revivals, not only of ancient but of medieval and Renaissance styles, linked to the rise of nation-states. Throughout the module, we will seek to understand the nature of particular renaissances and revivals and question the application and suitability of these terms. We will also engage with historical debates on the issue of periodization and ask how and why cycles of decline and renewal continue to shape our understanding of the past.

The Classical Tradition (Core)
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The Classical Tradition (Core)

This module provides an introduction to the historical and archaeological sources, approaches and methods necessary for the study of the ancient world. Lectures provide a survey of key moments in history, 1000 BC-AD 400, structured around the research specialisms of the module teaching team.

The Emperor in the Roman World (Option)
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The Emperor in the Roman World (Option)

This module surveys the history of the Roman Empire not as a succession of emperors and achievements, victories and defeats, but as a complex of experiments in government and of attitudes to governance. Beginning with the transition from representative republican rule to the domination of an imperial dynasty and its network of élite dependants in the early first century, and concluding with the incipient takeover of this system by a newly Christianised ruling class in the early fourth century, students can explore the role of the emperor in the Roman world and the patterns of communication between him and his subjects.

The Forgotten Revolution? The Emergence of Feudal Europe (Option)
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The Forgotten Revolution? The Emergence of Feudal Europe (Option)

Almost all historians share the view that the social, economic and political structures of Europe in 1000 A.D. were significantly different to those that characterised the western superpower of Late Antiquity, the Roman Empire. In this challenging module, students will be encouraged to engage with a range of source material that will allow them to come to their own conclusions. Given this wide focus, students will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the fascinating story of post-Carolingian Europe in such a way that they enhance their abilities to think comparatively, a crucial weapon in the historian’s armoury.

The Rise of Islam: Religion, culture and war in the Middle East (Option)
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The Rise of Islam: Religion, culture and war in the Middle East (Option)

The victories of Arab armies over the forces of the Byzantine and Persian Empires in the seventh century were of monumental importance. Not only did they signal the decline of the two great superpowers of the late ancient world but they were accompanied, some scholars would argue caused, by the rise of a new monotheistic world religion: Islam. The first half of the module seeks to understand the conquests of the Arab armies and the emergence of Islam historically and culturally, in two specific contexts: (1) political conflict between the Persian and Byzantine Empires, during which Arabia often acted as a military frontier and different Arab groups as allies to one side or another; (2) contact and competition between Christianity, Judaism and other religious traditions in Arabia. The second half of the module explores how, after the initial victories over the Byzantine and Persian Empires, the new Islamic polity renewed itself, rolled forward further conquests, and focuses in particular on how an ‘Islamic’ culture was formed.

Understanding Practical Making (Option)
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Understanding Practical Making (Option)

This module is designed to introduce the basic skills of working with glass, ceramic and fine metalwork. It provides an opportunity to investigate the potential and limitations of working with various materials, processes and techniques, associated with the practice of object manufacture against a relevant historical background.

Urban Life and Society in the Middle Ages (Option)
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Urban Life and Society in the Middle Ages (Option)

Between the 11th and the 12th centuries Europe went through some radical changes. This module will focus on case studies, such as Lincoln, London and Paris, among others. Students will have the opportunity to study how and why such centres grew from small towns to some of the greatest and most vibrant metropolis of Western Europe in the Middle Ages. For a comparative study, a range of primary sources will be taken into account, including contemporary descriptions of these cities and their inhabitants, historical records, art and architecture.

Village detectives: Unearthing new histories (Option)
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Village detectives: Unearthing new histories (Option)

The typical image of a rural village, whether a chocolate box idyll prettily nestled around its church or a commuter dormitory boringly empty of anything fun to do, rarely shows much evidence for anything dramatic, but these places were created by people who lived through events which are almost unimaginable to us today including the Norman Conquest and the Black Death, and for whom a perpetual challenge was simply surviving in a period where barely half of those born lived to adulthood. In this module students will have the opportunity to learn how to critically analyse and interpret historical and archaeological evidence and to use their knowledge and skills to write a new history of any rural settlement of their choice.

A Tale of Two Cities in Medieval Spain: From Toledo to Córdoba (Option)
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A Tale of Two Cities in Medieval Spain: From Toledo to Córdoba (Option)

In this module, students will have the opportunity to take a vivid and intellectually exciting journey through primary and secondary sources in order to understand the historical trajectory of the Iberian Peninsula from the end of the sixth century to the collapse of the Caliphate of Córdoba in 1031. The aim of the module is to provide an introduction to two major medieval cities, Toledo and Córdoba, via acquaintance with and discussion of material that allows us to reflect upon a fascinating complex of problems.

Advanced Latin I (Option)
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Advanced Latin I (Option)

The module offers further study of Latin language, including advanced grammar and syntax, with the aim of enabling students to engage with more complex Latin sources and to approach later Latin, including Medieval Latin. Students will read from a variety of classical Latin texts, including historiography, novels, poetry, inscriptions, panegyrical and other orations, laws. Students will be introduced to later Latin literature, including saints' lives.

Chivalry in Medieval Europe (Option)
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Chivalry in Medieval Europe (Option)

The module is aimed at exploring both the birth and development of the concept of chivalry in the Middle Ages. As a seminar-based module, a wide range of primary sources, as well as medieval and contemporary historiography on the subject will be made available to students, who will use them to explore how the role, image and function of medieval knights evolved over time.

Classical Commentary I (Option)
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Classical Commentary I (Option)

This module explores a single topic in ancient Greek history and civilisation. Topics will vary from year to year, according to the research interests and specialisms of available staff. Topics may include: Greek city states (poleis); the Peloponnesian War; Hellenistic Greece; Greece under the Romans; Classical Greek Art and Architecture.

Classical Studies Work Placement (Option)
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Classical Studies Work Placement (Option)

The module will give students practical experience of the workplace. Students will normally define, plan and undertake a specific project. In addition students will gain experience of a range of tasks appropriate to sector-specific professional skills.

History at the End of the World (Option)
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History at the End of the World (Option)

Historian, journalist, political commentator and gossip columnist Matthew Paris, monk of St Albans, wrote what is still one of our main sources for British history of the thirteenth century. This module looks at Matthew Paris’s Great Chronicle, considering both Matthew himself and what he tells us about what this tells us about thirteenth-century English society. Students have the opportunity to think about what history was in the thirteenth-century and about attitudes to foreigners and national identity; power and poverty; propaganda and fiction; time, space and the apocalypse.

Independent Study: Classics Stream (Core)
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Independent Study: Classics Stream (Core)

Students at level three have to undertake an Independent Study project. This is an extended piece of work that gives them the opportunity to demonstrate they have acquired the skills to undertake detailed and substantial study founded on critical inquiry and analysis.

Making Militants: Teaching violence in late antiquity (Option)
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Making Militants: Teaching violence in late antiquity (Option)

Making Militants explores the role of violent teaching practices of various sorts in the making of men and women in late antiquity. Focusing on the fourth, fifth and sixth centuries, it addresses a pivotal period in the transition from the ancient to the medieval world, surveying the multiple small-scale arenas that made up the late antiquity – the household, the schoolroom, the barracks, and the monastery. By reading closely letters, biographical accounts, rulebooks, speeches and a wide range of other sources, we consider how violent educative practices made people who were capable of operating in a changing, unpredictable and often dangerous world. The men and women who were made in such spaces were the products of a society that was fundamentally violent, their own violence a product of long-established socialisation practices rather than acts of anti-social deviance.

Republicanism in Early Modern England, 1500-1700 (Option)
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Republicanism in Early Modern England, 1500-1700 (Option)

Although early modern England was a kingdom, governed by a monarch, many historians have claimed that there was a strong ‘republican’ undercurrent to Tudor and Stuart political thought. This module introduces students to the key approaches and methodologies of the history of ideas by focusing upon the various ways in which scholars have studied and conceptualised republicanism in early modern England and the on-going debate surrounding the origin, content and influence of republican ideas in the period 1500-1700.

Roman Lincoln (Option)
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Roman Lincoln (Option)

The history, archaeology, visual and material culture of Roman Lincoln (Lindum Colonia), within the context of the provinces of Roman Britain.

Rome and Constantinople: Monuments and Memory, 200-1200 (Option)
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Rome and Constantinople: Monuments and Memory, 200-1200 (Option)

This module is devoted to two cities that were capitals of the Roman Empire, focusing on their monuments and how these were perceived and remembered over centuries. Rome and Constantinople, or Old Rome and New Rome as they came to be called in the East, were imperial cities where the most powerful figures – emperors and patriarchs, popes and saints – of antiquity and the Middle Ages built and destroyed, appropriated and reconfigured spaces, buildings and structures.

Rulers and Kings: Visualising Authority in Medieval Europe (Option)
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Rulers and Kings: Visualising Authority in Medieval Europe (Option)

This module investigates the nature of rulership during the middle ages, exploring how images and architecture served to visually define and articulate the authority of kings and rulers during the Middle Ages. The module will discuss in depth three different case studies: Charlemagne and the Holy Roman Empire; the Norman rulers of Southern Italy; Louis IX and the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris.

The Byzantine World, c.750-c.1500 (Option)
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The Byzantine World, c.750-c.1500 (Option)

This module is devoted to developing an understanding of the political, social and cultural history of the Byzantine World (c. CE 750-c. 1500), with a particular focus on institutions (for example the imperial office, monasteries), practices (warfare, diplomacy, ritual and ceremonial) and material resources (coinage, silks, 'Greek fire'). Byzantine art and architecture, literature and theology, will be studied in addressing aspects of the culture and ideology of the empire.

The Goths: Barbarians through history? (Option)
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The Goths: Barbarians through history? (Option)

This module explores two inter-related questions: Who were the Goths of late antiquity? Why have ideas of ‘Gothic-ness’ recurred so frequently since the end of the last Gothic kingdom in 711 CE? The module analyses historical, archaeological and other evidence for the Goths, their migration into Roman territory and their eventual settlement in Gaul, Spain and Italy in the third to eighth centuries. Drawing on the most recent scholarship, students will have the chance to challenge assumptions that the Goths were archetypal barbarians and caused the fall of the Roman Empire in the West and the dawn of a ‘dark age’.

The Roman City (Option)
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The Roman City (Option)

To the citizens of the Roman world, civility (civilitas) – right conduct of government, sound behaviour of individuals, citizenship itself – was a function of the city (civitas), which constituted the centre of the Roman state and society. This module will take students on a guided tour of the Roman city, using each stop along the way as a point of entry into one or more aspects of the politics, society, economy, and culture of Rome and its empire. Students will be challenged to reimagine urban life via a detailed engagement with a representative array of written, material, and visual sources and the main lines of the secondary literature.

The Roman Countryside (Option)
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The Roman Countryside (Option)

Before the Roman invasion of AD 43, everyone in Britain lived in ‘the countryside’, for the simple reason that there were no cities or towns. Indeed, throughout the four centuries of Roman rule which followed, the vast majority of people still lived outside of urban and military centres. The core objective of this module is an archaeological exploration of the great diversity of evidence, analysing the significance of the changing nature of rural society and the creation of rural landscapes and identities, focusing on Britain from the late pre-Roman Iron Age, through the Roman period, to its sub-Roman aftermath (c. 100 BC–AD 500).

What is the Renaissance? (Option)
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What is the Renaissance? (Option)

This module aims to explore the intellectual and cultural achievements of Renaissance, as well as its historiographic context. The period of transition from 'medieval' to 'modern' society that the Renaissance represents (or has been characterised as representing) is one of the most challenging areas of historical study, profoundly influencing historiography. Students will have the opportunity to examine in depth to what extent the historical periodisation of the 'Renaissance' has been a deliberate, although sometimes contentious, means to better understand events of the past, particularly in relation to cultural analysis.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Research

The research of our academic staff directly informs their teaching. The University has expertise ranging from Egyptology to the reception of antiquity, with particular strengths in Roman archaeology, Late Antique and Byzantine history, Early Christian visual and material culture, and Classical art and architecture.

Staff maintain a high research profile through publication in leading journals and prestigious essay collections, regular attendance at key national and international conferences, and as invited speakers or visiting fellows at other institutions, including universities, research centres and museums.

Lincoln Conservation

Lincoln Conservation brings together research, teaching and commercial expertise specialising in architectural paint research and the digital and physical conservation of historic objects, decorative schemes and buildings. The expertise of its consultants has helped to inform the restoration of the Midland Grand Hotel (now known as the St Pancras Renaissance Hotel), HMS Victory and Southwell Minster, amongst others.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

2018/19 UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £13,800 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,100 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above.

Applicants will also be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (or equivalent), including English.

Mature students with extensive relevant experience will be selected on individual merit. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

If you would like further information about entry requirements or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097 or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.

Dr Jamie Wood

Dr Jamie Wood

Interim Programme Leader

Dr Jamie Wood is a Principal Lecturer in the School of History and Heritage. He specialises in the social and cultural history of the late antique and early Medieval Mediterranean, particularly Spain. Jamie has lectured at the Universities of Sheffield, Warwick and Liverpool, and completed his Leverhulme Early Career Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Manchester.


Your Future Career

Classical Studies can enable students to develop skills in textual and visual analysis, reading closely, translating and interpreting, thinking critically and presenting complex information with clarity and authority.

Graduates in this discipline may find employment in museums and galleries, publishing and administration, teaching and research, but also in other areas such as advertising, consultancy and PR, and the administrative, managerial, media and financial sectors. Some may continue their study at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

ClassicalStudiesQuote

"Who on Earth is so careless or lazy that he would not wish to learn how and under what form of government almost all of the inhabited world was conquered and became subject to the rule of Rome in less than 53 years?"

Polybius, Histories 1.1.5

Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

Students can study and research in the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.

The University is situated next to the picturesque Brayford Pool marina, just a few minutes' walk away from the thriving city centre, which offers a wealth of shops, restaurants and accommodation.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.