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Course Information

BA (Hons)

BA (Hons)

Select year of entry:
3 years Lincoln School of Film & Media Lincoln Campus [L] Validated 280 points to include 100 points from an A Level (or equivalent) art, design or media subject. (See below) W270 3 years Lincoln School of Film & Media Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BBC (See below) W270

95%of Lincoln Animation graduates are employed or in further study six months after finishing this course according to the latest Destination of Leavers from Higher Education survey, as provided by unistats.com.

Animation Careers

Some Animation BA(Hons) graduates have gone on to work on exciting productions such as The Snowman and the Snowdog, 300: Rise of an Empire, The Dark Knight, Primeval 2, and even helped create a Hippogriff in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.

Introduction

The BA (Hons) Animation degree aims to introduce students to the innovative world of moving image, digital visualisation and contemporary narrative. The aim of this course is to develop creative animators and artists with the flexibility to practise their craft in a variety of media.

Students can gain an understanding of how the media of two-dimensional traditionally drawn animation and three-dimensional computer-generated techniques merge to create unique, innovative projects.

How You Study

Students have the opportunity to gain a thorough grounding in classical animation principles and an introduction to digital techniques. Life drawing forms an integral part of the course, combined with developing narrative, character design and animation techniques.

In the final year, students can work within a team to produce a short film that sets the premise for their personal showreel. Students are encouraged to participate in various stages of production, such as character animation, art direction and lighting, digital compositing and effects, post-production techniques and production management.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of your degree. However, remember that you are engaging in a full-time degree; so, at the very least, you should expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time and you may undertake assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Are Assessed

Each semester there are advisory progress reviews, and at the end of each unit students have the opportunity to present their portfolio and studio work, as well as submitting any appropriate theatrical work.

All studio units are assessed on both studio production and supporting research presentation, with varying weightings according to unit specification.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Methods of Assessment

The way you will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Interviews & Applicant Days

Applicants will be invited for interview, whereby they will have the opportunity to go through their portfolio with a member of the academic team.

A portfolio should comprise of Drawing, including examples of good analytical and observational drawing, Digital Work, such as CAD, artwork, photography, video or animation, and any personal work that highlights independent working practices.

What We Look For In Your Application

You will need an aptitude for sequential art and design. Inquisitiveness and a sense of humour will also aid you in developing narrative.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln School of Film & Media Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2016-17

Applicants should have a minimum of 280 UCAS tariff points, or equivalent, with 100 points from an art or design subject.

All applicants will be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above, including English Language.

The University of Lincoln accepts a wide range of qualifications, including A Levels, AS Levels, the BTEC Extended Diploma, Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma, the European and International Baccalaureate Diplomas, and Advanced Diplomas. You can find tariff values on the UCAS website: http://lncn.eu/cdez

Applicants will need to complete a successful interview.

Applications from mature students with extensive relevant work experience and a portfolio of work will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Animation Practice 01 and PDP

A final module allowing an output for the developed skills within the practical modules run within this level. The short film places students in small groups, focusing on using the varied uses of animation, from traditional and computer generated process. The content of the film is generated via the storyboard realisation of the Narrative Design & Development module, and each project will involve collaboration between Year 1 and Year 3, to platform the work generated within this module to be aired at the 3rd Year Degree show screening.

Animation Principles

This module is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of animation. Through a series of exercises that explore the techniques used to animate a basic sequence, the learner is introduced to the fundamental concepts behind all animation.

Historical and Contextual Practice

Central core module to Level One, which establishes animation within its historical, developmental, and social context. The topics explored range from its mainstream roots, to more diverse uses of the medium, and its international presence. Students have the opportunity to gain awareness of their chosen subject matter and understanding of its meaning as an art form.

Narrative Design and Development

This module aims to develop an understanding of the importance of narrative in animation. It concentrates on the storyboard as a communication tool, from basic cave painting origins to comic books to pre-visualisation. Students are required to develop simple narrative structures to depict a theme centred on producing a ‘sting’ or short animated sequence to be used within the fabric of the 3rd Year Degree Show; encompassing the use of archetypes, styles and genre, together with an introduction to the principles of filmic language.

Representation and Animation Design

A key module to aid the development within Animation Principles, allowing the student the opportunity to experiment in a variety of methods and materials within mark making, painting and sculpting. Life drawing, colour theory, basic design for communication and composition (layout) are also explored within this module.

Level 2

Animation Practice 02 and PDP

Students have the opportunity to develop a short animated scene, centred on the performance of two opposing character. Narrative drive and script are explored, focusing on characterisation within the construct of a scene. This module draws from skills and contexts explored within the Characterisation & Creature Animation module.

Digital Layout Design and Character Animation 01

This module builds upon understanding acquired in Level One, to platform new skills associated with creation of an environment for a series of animations to take place. Animation, like film / TV production needs an area to ‘happen’ in. In animation these areas are often crafted from nothing, meaning they are built, drawn or visualised virtually. This is a necessary skill within animation production, and a newly found method open to other subject areas such as Architecture. Students have the opportunity to explore the practice of set design and basis of spatial awareness in the creation of a virtual set. The second proportion of this unit will provide the opportunity to further skills acquired within Level One’s practical animation tasks. Students will have the chance to explore characterisation, within the context of acting, emotion and motion dynamics, in the form of a series of exercises, which take place within the virtual environment, realised within the first proportion of the unit. Use of design, texture and light will be explored, together with developing filmic skills in the rendering of each short animated sequence.

Digital Skills Development

This module builds upon the development and skills acquired in Digital Layout Design & Character Animation 01, allowing the student to define greater depth in the development of a specific skillbase. This may be a narrow focus, for example, exploring in depth Character Animation through quadruped movement; or in layout, this may develop into a study of modelling for architectural design through to cinematic lighting. More generalist study may also be adopted, exploring a set of skills across artistry and character animation, and how each may link with one another.

The module invites students to consider professional working methods, communication of ideas and responsibility for self recorded development; as such key transferable skills are further enhanced. The module expands on the working practice of digital techniques and problem solving, and the use of software to enhance traditional skillsets, such as drawing, sculpting and painting.

Sound Design

The sound design module aims to introduce students to the key companion of animation, the soundtrack. Students can explore a range of processes and techniques dealing with the construction, recording, design, layering and implementation of sound and music. The key component of this module will be image & picture synchronisation, lip-syncing and the contextual meaning inherent to understanding the connection between sound & image.

The Animation Business Case Study

This module offers the choice to explore the business side of animation production internationally, and focus their study within one its related disciplines such as Feature Animation, Commercials, Effects, Architectural Visualisation, Games Design to Avant Garde Expression.

Level 3

Animation Post Production and PDP

The Post Production module serves as the final element of the production process, aiding students to develop their showreel and or group together on one of the film proposals, taking an equal proportion of the entire production through the to final completion.

Animation Dissertation

Students have the opportunity to engage in a detailed, in-depth study of research and argument, meeting the merit of a Thesis within their chosen subject (relating in part to their study and external interests), is it social, political, cultural and diverse in nature.

Animation Pre-Production

The module aims to prepare students for the creative and professional challenges of bringing a conceptual idea to the stage of feasible project proposal, which can be presented to a client, employer or commissioner.

Animation Production and Team Practice

Within this module, students have the opportunity to take forward the work created and developed in pre-production, to form the central element of the production.

Students may negotiate their time, referring to the plan produced in pre-production, to form small cohesive teams, reflective of how a production would be structured in a professional animation practice.

The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Animation degree students have the opportunity to take part in study trips and overseas visits. Recent destinations include Annecy International Animated Film Festival in France, the Walt Disney Studios and Jim Henson Studios in Los Angeles, NBC, the University of California and Warner Bros Studios. Costs relating to these are outlined in the Fees Tab.

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD

Students on this course will receive a licence for Adobe Creative Cloud free of charge

Students on this course also have the opportunity to hear from visiting guest speakers from many parts of the animation and media industries. See here for details:
http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/fm/abouttheschool/visitingspeakers/

Placements

Placement Year

When you are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, you will be required to cover your own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

Students have access to specialist industry-standard facilities and equipment, dedicated studios, workshops, Mac and PC suites, a render farm and gallery space.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever your area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which you may need in your future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

This degree aims to equip graduates for careers in animation, computer games artistry and as 3D artists who work in visual effects, broadcast, commercial production and visualisation.

Graduates have secured jobs with leading practitioners across the animation industry including Double Negative, Cinesite and Framestore CFC. Our graduates have worked on popular films, such as Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and The Dark Knight.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and your meals may be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional you will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay your own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

This programme aims to run at least one study trip for students during their time on the course, this is optional and does not have an impact upon grades for the course. For the last two years the programme has given students the opportunity to visit Annecy International Animated Film Festival in France, the cost is approx. £720 to students, based on 2015 prices.

Related Courses

The BA (Hons) Film and Television degree comprises academic study in both film and television, which is complemented by practical and creative projects in television studio production, film and scriptwriting. This programme is 75% theory and 25% practice based.
The BA (Hons) Fine Art degree focuses on the artist as a socially responsive, publicly-aware practitioner operating within physical, intellectual and digital networks and referencing local, national and global artistic platforms.
The BSc (Hons) Games Computing degree at Lincoln aims to equip graduates with the skills necessary for a technical career within the creative games and entertainment industry, including mobile, social media and console game development.
The MComp is a four-year degree programme which enhances and extends the equivalent BSc (Hons) programme. It provides the opportunity to study a range of modules at Master’s level and to complete a substantive project in an area of specific personal interest. Studying at Master’s level enables you to both deepen and broaden your knowledge and understanding. This can provide you with a stronger CV and may give you a distinct edge in the job market.
With established links to the Association of Illustrators, the BA (Hons) Illustration degree aims to enable students to develop their own unique visual signature style and encourages them to prepare for the competitive world of professional illustration.
The BA (Hons) Interactive Design degree at Lincoln is a broad-based design course providing opportunities to work on inspiring briefs to develop the innovative thinking, artistic creativity, flexibility and technical ability needed to succeed in the digital design industry.
Taught by experienced, research and industry-active academics, the BA (Hons) Media Production at Lincoln is designed to support students’ growth as creative media professionals and provides the opportunity to develop a range of specialist skills.
For aspiring photographers and moving image makers, Lincoln's BA (Hons) Photography degree offers an artistic learning environment that values creative expression. Students have the opportunity to learn from academics who are experienced practitioners with active links to industry.

Introduction

The BA (Hons) Animation degree aims to introduce students to the innovative world of moving image, digital visualisation and contemporary narrative. The aim of this course is to develop creative animators and artists with the flexibility to practise their craft in a variety of media.

Students can gain an understanding of how the media of two-dimensional traditionally drawn animation and three-dimensional computer-generated techniques merge to create unique, innovative projects.

How You Study

Students have the opportunity to gain a thorough grounding in classical animation principles and an introduction to digital techniques. Life drawing forms an integral part of the course, combined with developing narrative, character design and animation techniques.

In the final year, students can work within a team to produce a short film that sets the premise for their personal showreel. Students are encouraged to participate in various stages of production, such as character animation, art direction and lighting, digital compositing and effects, post-production techniques and production management.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of your degree. However, remember that you are engaging in a full-time degree; so, at the very least, you should expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time and you may undertake assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Are Assessed

Each semester there are advisory progress reviews, and at the end of each unit students have the opportunity to present their portfolio and studio work, as well as submitting any appropriate theatrical work.

All studio units are assessed on both studio production and supporting research presentation, with varying weightings according to unit specification.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Methods of Assessment

The way you will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Interviews & Applicant Days

Applicants will be invited for interview, whereby they will have the opportunity to go through their portfolio with a member of the academic team.

A portfolio should comprise of Drawing, including examples of good analytical and observational drawing, Digital Work, such as CAD, artwork, photography, video or animation, and any personal work that highlights independent working practices.

What We Look For In Your Application

You will need an aptitude for sequential art and design. Inquisitiveness and a sense of humour will also aid you in developing narrative.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln School of Film & Media Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC, including grade B from an A Level art, design or media studies related subject.

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall, with 5 at Higher Level from an art, design or media studies related subject.

BTEC Extended Diploma in an art, design or media related subject: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma in an art, design or media related subject: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required.

In addition, all applicants will be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above, including English.

Applicants will need to complete a successful interview.

Applications from mature students with extensive relevant work experience and a portfolio of work will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Animation Practice 01 and PDP

A final module allowing an output for the developed skills within the practical modules run within this level. The short film places students in small groups, focusing on using the varied uses of animation, from traditional and computer generated process. The content of the film is generated via the storyboard realisation of the Narrative Design & Development module, and each project will involve collaboration between Year 1 and Year 3, to platform the work generated within this module to be aired at the 3rd Year Degree show screening.

Animation Principles

This module is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of animation. Through a series of exercises that explore the techniques used to animate a basic sequence, the learner is introduced to the fundamental concepts behind all animation.

Historical and Contextual Practice

Central core module to Level One, which establishes animation within its historical, developmental, and social context. The topics explored range from its mainstream roots, to more diverse uses of the medium, and its international presence. Students have the opportunity to gain awareness of their chosen subject matter and understanding of its meaning as an art form.

Narrative Design and Development

This module aims to develop an understanding of the importance of narrative in animation. It concentrates on the storyboard as a communication tool, from basic cave painting origins to comic books to pre-visualisation. Students are required to develop simple narrative structures to depict a theme centred on producing a ‘sting’ or short animated sequence to be used within the fabric of the 3rd Year Degree Show; encompassing the use of archetypes, styles and genre, together with an introduction to the principles of filmic language.

Representation and Animation Design

A key module to aid the development within Animation Principles, allowing the student the opportunity to experiment in a variety of methods and materials within mark making, painting and sculpting. Life drawing, colour theory, basic design for communication and composition (layout) are also explored within this module.

Level 2

Animation Practice 02 and PDP

Students have the opportunity to develop a short animated scene, centred on the performance of two opposing character. Narrative drive and script are explored, focusing on characterisation within the construct of a scene. This module draws from skills and contexts explored within the Characterisation & Creature Animation module.

Digital Layout Design and Character Animation 01

This module builds upon understanding acquired in Level One, to platform new skills associated with creation of an environment for a series of animations to take place. Animation, like film / TV production needs an area to ‘happen’ in. In animation these areas are often crafted from nothing, meaning they are built, drawn or visualised virtually. This is a necessary skill within animation production, and a newly found method open to other subject areas such as Architecture. Students have the opportunity to explore the practice of set design and basis of spatial awareness in the creation of a virtual set. The second proportion of this unit will provide the opportunity to further skills acquired within Level One’s practical animation tasks. Students will have the chance to explore characterisation, within the context of acting, emotion and motion dynamics, in the form of a series of exercises, which take place within the virtual environment, realised within the first proportion of the unit. Use of design, texture and light will be explored, together with developing filmic skills in the rendering of each short animated sequence.

Digital Skills Development

This module builds upon the development and skills acquired in Digital Layout Design & Character Animation 01, allowing the student to define greater depth in the development of a specific skillbase. This may be a narrow focus, for example, exploring in depth Character Animation through quadruped movement; or in layout, this may develop into a study of modelling for architectural design through to cinematic lighting. More generalist study may also be adopted, exploring a set of skills across artistry and character animation, and how each may link with one another.

The module invites students to consider professional working methods, communication of ideas and responsibility for self recorded development; as such key transferable skills are further enhanced. The module expands on the working practice of digital techniques and problem solving, and the use of software to enhance traditional skillsets, such as drawing, sculpting and painting.

Sound Design

The sound design module aims to introduce students to the key companion of animation, the soundtrack. Students can explore a range of processes and techniques dealing with the construction, recording, design, layering and implementation of sound and music. The key component of this module will be image & picture synchronisation, lip-syncing and the contextual meaning inherent to understanding the connection between sound & image.

The Animation Business Case Study

This module offers the choice to explore the business side of animation production internationally, and focus their study within one its related disciplines such as Feature Animation, Commercials, Effects, Architectural Visualisation, Games Design to Avant Garde Expression.

Level 3

Animation Post Production and PDP

The Post Production module serves as the final element of the production process, aiding students to develop their showreel and or group together on one of the film proposals, taking an equal proportion of the entire production through the to final completion.

Animation Dissertation

Students have the opportunity to engage in a detailed, in-depth study of research and argument, meeting the merit of a Thesis within their chosen subject (relating in part to their study and external interests), is it social, political, cultural and diverse in nature.

Animation Pre-Production

The module aims to prepare students for the creative and professional challenges of bringing a conceptual idea to the stage of feasible project proposal, which can be presented to a client, employer or commissioner.

Animation Production and Team Practice

Within this module, students have the opportunity to take forward the work created and developed in pre-production, to form the central element of the production.

Students may negotiate their time, referring to the plan produced in pre-production, to form small cohesive teams, reflective of how a production would be structured in a professional animation practice.

The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Animation degree students have the opportunity to take part in study trips and overseas visits. Recent destinations include Annecy International Animated Film Festival in France, the Walt Disney Studios and Jim Henson Studios in Los Angeles, NBC, the University of California and Warner Bros Studios. Costs relating to these are outlined in the Fees Tab.

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD

Students on this course will receive a licence for Adobe Creative Cloud free of charge

Students on this course also have the opportunity to hear from visiting guest speakers from many parts of the animation and media industries. See here for details:
http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/fm/abouttheschool/visitingspeakers/

Placements

Placement Year

When you are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, you will be required to cover your own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

Students have access to specialist industry-standard facilities and equipment, dedicated studios, workshops, Mac and PC suites, a render farm and gallery space.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever your area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which you may need in your future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

This degree aims to equip graduates for careers in animation, computer games artistry and as 3D artists who work in visual effects, broadcast, commercial production and visualisation.

Graduates have secured jobs with leading practitioners across the animation industry including Double Negative, Cinesite and Framestore CFC. Our graduates have worked on popular films, such as Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and The Dark Knight.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and your meals may be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional you will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay your own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

This programme aims to run at least one study trip for students during their time on the course, this is optional and does not have an impact upon grades for the course. For the last two years the programme has given students the opportunity to visit Annecy International Animated Film Festival in France, the cost is approx. £720 to students, based on 2015 prices.

Related Courses

The BA (Hons) Film and Television degree comprises academic study in both film and television, which is complemented by practical and creative projects in television studio production, film and scriptwriting. This programme is 75% theory and 25% practice based.
The BA (Hons) Fine Art degree focuses on the artist as a socially responsive, publicly-aware practitioner operating within physical, intellectual and digital networks and referencing local, national and global artistic platforms.
The BSc (Hons) Games Computing degree at Lincoln aims to equip graduates with the skills necessary for a technical career within the creative games and entertainment industry, including mobile, social media and console game development.
The MComp is a four-year degree programme which enhances and extends the equivalent BSc (Hons) programme. It provides the opportunity to study a range of modules at Master’s level and to complete a substantive project in an area of specific personal interest. Studying at Master’s level enables you to both deepen and broaden your knowledge and understanding. This can provide you with a stronger CV and may give you a distinct edge in the job market.
With established links to the Association of Illustrators, the BA (Hons) Illustration degree aims to enable students to develop their own unique visual signature style and encourages them to prepare for the competitive world of professional illustration.
The BA (Hons) Interactive Design degree at Lincoln is a broad-based design course providing opportunities to work on inspiring briefs to develop the innovative thinking, artistic creativity, flexibility and technical ability needed to succeed in the digital design industry.
Taught by experienced, research and industry-active academics, the BA (Hons) Media Production at Lincoln is designed to support students’ growth as creative media professionals and provides the opportunity to develop a range of specialist skills.
For aspiring photographers and moving image makers, Lincoln's BA (Hons) Photography degree offers an artistic learning environment that values creative expression. Students have the opportunity to learn from academics who are experienced practitioners with active links to industry.

Tuition Fees

2016/17 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,000 per level £14,500 per level
Part-time £75 per credit point  
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2017/18 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,000 per level £14,500 per level
Part-time £75 per credit point  
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For further information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Showcase

Student Work

Animation BA(Hons) Showreel
Learn more about the Lincoln School of Film and Media, our courses and what we do.

View more student work on social media

BA (Hons) Animation on YouTube BA (Hons) Animation on Vimeo

The amazing thing about this industry is that you can work all over the world and do something different all the time. Your work can be seen by millions – it’s a bit mind blowing when you think about it! Darren Rodriguez, Animation graduate

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions]