Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

INARDSMA

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

INARDSMA

MA Interior Architecture and Design MA Interior Architecture and Design

This course adopts a research-engaged design approach and is largely project based.

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

INARDSMA

Key Information

Full-time

1 year

Campus

Brayford Pool

Validation Status

Validated

Fees

View

Course Code

INARDSMA

Teaching and Learning During COVID-19

The current COVID-19 pandemic has meant that at Lincoln we are making changes to our teaching and learning approach and to our campus, to ensure that students and staff can enjoy a safe and positive learning experience here at Lincoln.

From autumn 2020 our aim is to provide an on-campus learning experience. Our intention is that teaching will be delivered through a mixture of face-to-face and online sessions. There will be social activities in place for students - all in line with appropriate social distancing and fully adhering to any changes in government guidance as our students' safety is our primary concern.

We want to ensure that your Lincoln experience is as positive, exciting and enjoyable as possible as you embark on the next phase of your life. COVID-19 has encouraged us to review our practices and, as a result, to take the opportunity to find new ways to enhance the Lincoln experience. It has challenged us to find innovative new approaches to supporting students' learning and social interactions. These learning experiences, which blend digital and face-to-face, will be vital in helping to prepare our students for a 21st Century workplace.

Of course at Lincoln, personal tutoring is key to our delivery, providing every student with a dedicated tutor to support them throughout their time here at the University. Smaller class sizes mean our academic staff can engage with each student as an individual, and work with them to enhance their strengths. In this environment we hope that students have more opportunities for discussion and engagement and get to know each other better.

Course learning outcomes are vital to prepare you for your future and we aim to utilise this mix of face-to-face and online teaching to deliver these. Students benefit from and enjoy fieldtrips and placements and, whilst it is currently hard to predict the availability of these, we are working hard and with partners and will aspire to offer these wherever possible - obviously in compliance with whatever government guidance is in place at the time.

We are utilising a range of different digital tools for teaching including our dedicated online managed learning environment. All lectures for larger groups will be delivered online using interactive software and a range of different formats. We aim to make every contact count and seminars and small group sessions will maximise face-to-face interaction. Practicals, workshops, studio sessions and performance-based sessions are planned to be delivered face-to-face, in a socially distanced way with appropriate PPE.

The University of Lincoln is a top 20 TEF Gold University and we have won awards for our approach to teaching and learning, our partnerships and industry links, and the opportunities these provide for our students. Our aim is that our online and socially distanced delivery during this COVID-19 pandemic is engaging and that students can interact with their tutors and each other and contribute to our academic community.

As and when restrictions start to lift, we aim to deliver an increasing amount of face-to-face teaching and external engagements, depending on each course. Safety will continue to be our primary focus and we will respond to any changing circumstances as they arise to ensure our community is supported. More information about the specific approaches for each course will be shared when teaching starts.

Of course as you start a new academic year it will be challenging but we will be working with you every step of the way. For all our students new and established, we look forward to welcoming you to our vibrant community this Autumn. If you have any questions please visit our FAQs or contact us on 01522 886644.

Dr Raymund Konigk - Programme Leader

Dr Raymund Konigk - Programme Leader

Dr Raymund Konigk is the Programme Leader for the MA in Interior Architecture and Design. His master's dissertation investigated interior design as a discipline and defined it as a profession. His completed doctoral studies investigated the imaginal interior and the role of generating meaning in the interior artefact. He has contributed to a number of national and international organisations, including recent symposia for the GloW-DESIGN in Singapore; the International Federation of Interior Architects/Designers in New York and plenary addresses for the China Productivity Centre in Taipei and the Malaysian Institute of Interior Designers in Kuala Lumpur.

School Staff List Make an Enquiry

Welcome to MA Interior Architecture and Design

This MA programme is designed for art, architecture and design graduates who wish to specialise in creative approaches to interiors in buildings and environmental design.

The programme is designed to enable you to explore the potential of spaces and structures with input from lecturers and practitioners. You can benefit from a multidisciplinary studio environment at the Lincoln School of Design, offering an integrated approach to research and study. You may choose to engage with the research community in the School to inform your investigations.

There is the opportunity to develop a network of industry contacts and compile an individual portfolio.

Welcome to MA Interior Architecture and Design

Lincoln’s MA Interior Architecture and Design is designed for art, architecture, and design graduates who wish to specialise in creative approaches to the making of interior.

Following ‘Student as Producer’ principles, the course adopts a research-engaged design approach. The design studio is the vehicle for the delivery of a teaching and learning strategy which is largely project-based. This allows for the presentation of the studio as a simulated interior architecture and design consultancy. Students act as design associates in a firm with an established ethos, knowledge base, culture, documentation standards, and design approach under the direction of a team of managers.

The programme offers two pathways: Treatise by Practice and Treatise by Research; both pathways are designed to provide a platform to progress to further employment in interior consultancies or to advanced study at doctoral level.

How You Study

Weekly contact hours on this programme may vary depending on the individual module options chosen and the stage of study. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend at least two - three hours in independent study. For more detailed information please contact the programme leader.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

How You Study

MA Interior Architecture and Design is a full-time course running over a 40-week period, from September to August, or February to December.

All students enrol on the Master’s programme. You may then elect to take a stage qualification or pursue the full programme.

Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in studio, lectures, and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour spent in class, students are expected to spend at least three hours in independent study. For more detailed information, please contact the Programme Leader.

Delivery:

Contact Sessions (25%)

  • Seminar: a classroom session focussing on a particular topic or project; typically a tutor-led group discussion.
  • Tutorial: a meeting involving one-to-one supervision, with feedback or detailed discussion. Students must be prepared and bring discussion points/agenda items and project management documentation.
  • Supervised work: students work independently but under supervision in a studio.
  • Peer-to-peer: students explain their ideas to each other and participate in shared learning/working activities.
  • Charrettes: students participate in directed design activities/exercises under supervision.

Self-directed learning (75%)

  • Fieldwork: practical work conducted at an external site; such as building surveys and data collection.
  • Projects: students plan and execute their own projects.
  • Library: students conduct independent reviews of subject literature in the library.
  • E-learning: students complete prescribed online learning activities in their own time.

Studio meetings take place on a Monday, and studio work on a Friday. Research seminars are presented on a Monday for the first seven weeks in Term 1 and 2. Lectures are presented on a Wednesday for the first seven weeks in Term 1 and 2. Fieldwork and self-directed study is scheduled for the remainder.

What You Need to Know

We want you to have all the information you need to make an informed decision on where and what you want to study. To help you choose the course that’s right for you, we aim to bring to your attention all the important information you may need. Our What You Need to Know page offers detailed information on key areas including contact hours, assessment, optional modules, and additional costs. For research programmes this includes research fees and research support fees.

Find out More

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module provides an opportunity for students to build on, and significantly extend, their certificate stage experience through a combination of practice and written enquiry. The module is designed to enable students to undertake more advanced and in-depth study in preparation for the final masters level thesis project.

The module comprises two linked sections where the students’ particular research interests can be critically explored through a process of self-directed practice based enquiry, supported by a complementary written study.

Practice:

Students have the opportunity to advance their personal practice by conducting a pilot study in the form of a critical investigation into an aspect of their field of interest. The study may be conceptual/ material/ technical or cultural in focus and should be innovative and speculative in character. The issue(s) under investigation will normally comprise an area of enquiry that may be expanded upon within the final stage of the programme, the master’s thesis.

Written Study:

Students are expected to investigate the social and cultural context of a specialist area of Interior Architecture and Design and undertake an independently managed research study linked to their personal practice. Regular seminars or group tutorials are available to guide the student through a staged process of research to the submission of a theorised essay/ report which may, if so desired, form the basis of more sustained written investigation within the master’s thesis.

Module Overview

This module provides students with an the opportunity to develop an understanding of basic research processes, research ethics and a critical framework for the foundation of research questions and strategies.

Lectures and seminars encourage an appreciation of different approaches to research and an understanding of the significance of alternative epistemological positions that provide the context for art and design research. The module provides an overview of critical paradigms that may be used to underpin research leading to either practice based or written outcomes.

Through selected readings, lectures and seminar discussions a variety of social and cultural theoretical perspectives will be considered relating to Interior Architecture and Design.

Module Overview

This module, the final stage of the Masters programme, provides an opportunity to produce a substantial body of work and the chance to significantly extend knowledge, skills and professional abilities. The module aims to build on the experience gained previously in the course and it may be either an in-depth study of a one area of the previous work or an investigation into its wider implications. The resultant project gives considerable scope for expressing original thought, creative ability and independent achievement.

The Master’s Thesis may take the form of either a substantial practice based investigation or a 15,000 word dissertation/ report. The nature of the study will be defined, in consultation with staff, prior to the commencement of the module.

The completed Thesis Project should be an original and independent piece of work. It should, in the context of existing knowledge, demonstrate understanding, critical analysis and original thinking, as well as demonstrating general academic and professional communication skills. It also seeks to foster an ability to work autonomously, and aims to prepare students for either an active role in the professional arena or for further academic study.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students from different cultural and specialist backgrounds to the basic principles of practice based research and to more advanced theoretical and practical issues pertinent to Interior Architecture and Design. It is designed to enable the student to begin to map out an area of interest in order to establish specific objectives for their individual programme of study.

The module provides an induction programme, team building exercises, and an opportunity for the student to test ideas and approaches through a combination of practical and written exercises. The subject and nature of the work will arise out of negotiations/ discussions between the tutor and individual student. Students are expected to demonstrate a wide range of skills and knowledge in planning, implementing, documenting and presenting their practical/written work.

Students are also expected to produce a project file. This acts as a sketchbook, ideas book and developmental record. In addition, the file should include self evaluation and a reflective working diary.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

An Introduction to Your Modules

Module Overview

This module provides an opportunity for students to build on, and significantly extend, their certificate stage experience through a combination of practice and written enquiry. The module is designed to enable students to undertake more advanced and in-depth study in preparation for the final masters level thesis project.

The module comprises two linked sections where the students’ particular research interests can be critically explored through a process of self-directed practice based enquiry, supported by a complementary written study.

Practice:

Students have the opportunity to advance their personal practice by conducting a pilot study in the form of a critical investigation into an aspect of their field of interest. The study may be conceptual/ material/ technical or cultural in focus and should be innovative and speculative in character. The issue(s) under investigation will normally comprise an area of enquiry that may be expanded upon within the final stage of the programme, the master’s thesis.

Written Study:

Students are expected to investigate the social and cultural context of a specialist area of Interior Architecture and Design and undertake an independently managed research study linked to their personal practice. Regular seminars or group tutorials are available to guide the student through a staged process of research to the submission of a theorised essay/ report which may, if so desired, form the basis of more sustained written investigation within the master’s thesis.

Module Overview

This module provides students with an the opportunity to develop an understanding of basic research processes, research ethics and a critical framework for the foundation of research questions and strategies.

Lectures and seminars encourage an appreciation of different approaches to research and an understanding of the significance of alternative epistemological positions that provide the context for art and design research. The module provides an overview of critical paradigms that may be used to underpin research leading to either practice based or written outcomes.

Through selected readings, lectures and seminar discussions a variety of social and cultural theoretical perspectives will be considered relating to Interior Architecture and Design.

Module Overview

This module, the final stage of the Masters programme, provides an opportunity to produce a substantial body of work and the chance to significantly extend knowledge, skills and professional abilities. The module aims to build on the experience gained previously in the course and it may be either an in-depth study of a one area of the previous work or an investigation into its wider implications. The resultant project gives considerable scope for expressing original thought, creative ability and independent achievement.

The Master’s Thesis may take the form of either a substantial practice based investigation or a 15,000 word dissertation/ report. The nature of the study will be defined, in consultation with staff, prior to the commencement of the module.

The completed Thesis Project should be an original and independent piece of work. It should, in the context of existing knowledge, demonstrate understanding, critical analysis and original thinking, as well as demonstrating general academic and professional communication skills. It also seeks to foster an ability to work autonomously, and aims to prepare students for either an active role in the professional arena or for further academic study.

Module Overview

This module aims to introduce students from different cultural and specialist backgrounds to the basic principles of practice based research and to more advanced theoretical and practical issues pertinent to Interior Architecture and Design. It is designed to enable the student to begin to map out an area of interest in order to establish specific objectives for their individual programme of study.

The module provides an induction programme, team building exercises, and an opportunity for the student to test ideas and approaches through a combination of practical and written exercises. The subject and nature of the work will arise out of negotiations/ discussions between the tutor and individual student. Students are expected to demonstrate a wide range of skills and knowledge in planning, implementing, documenting and presenting their practical/written work.

Students are also expected to produce a project file. This acts as a sketchbook, ideas book and developmental record. In addition, the file should include self evaluation and a reflective working diary.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

How you are assessed

Formative assessment occurs regularly throughout the programme by means of student critiques, draft written assignments and progress reviews. Summative assessment is via project presentation supported by written project documentation.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Formative assessment occurs regularly throughout the programme by means of student critiques, draft written assignments, and progress reviews. Summative assessment is via project presentation supported by written project documentation.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Fees and Scholarships

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

There are additional costs associated with this course. These will vary depending on the scope and ambition of the research and practice carried out by each student on the programme

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

Postgraduate study is an investment in yourself and your future, and it's important to understand the costs involved and the funding options available before you start. A full breakdown of the fees associated with this programme can be found on our course fees pages.

Course Fees

There are more ways than ever before to fund your postgraduate study, whether you want to do a taught or research course. For those wishing to undertake a Master's course, you can apply for a loan as a contribution towards the course and living costs. Loans are also available to those who wish to undertake doctoral study. The University offers a number of scholarships and funded studentships for those interested in postgraduate study. Learn how Master's and PhD loans, scholarships, and studentships can help you fund your studies on our Postgraduate Fees and Funding pages.

Course-Specific Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for travel and accommodation will be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional, you will normally be required to pay your own transport, accommodation and general living costs.

There are additional costs associated with this course. These will vary depending on the scope and ambition of the research and practice carried out by each student on the programme

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

Entry Requirements 2019-20

First or second class honours degree or equivalent professional experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Entry Requirements 2020-21

First or second class honours degree or equivalent professional experience.

If you have studied outside of the UK, and are unsure whether your qualification meets the above requirements, please visit our country pages https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/entryrequirementsandyourcountry/ for information on equivalent qualifications.

Overseas students will be required to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of 5.5 in each element. For information regarding other English language qualifications we accept, please visit the English Requirements page https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/englishlanguagerequirements/.

If you do not meet the above IELTS requirements, you may be able to take part in one of our Pre-session English and Academic Study Skills courses. https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/englishlanguagerequirementsandsupport/pre-sessionalenglishandacademicstudyskills/ . These specialist courses are designed to help students meet the English language requirements for their intended programme of study.

Research Areas and Topics

The course is supported by the research endeavour of the Critical Heritage and Place Consumption Research Group. (https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/lsd/research/criticalheritageandplaceconsumptionresearch/)

Students develop their own projects, within set parameters. Projects are conceptualised as the critical response to existing built heritage (this includes contemporary and historic buildings which can be considered as heritage at risk or as underutilised resources).

Studio production incorporates knowledge-based practices, is inquiry-based, and can be described as research-engaged design. In this, the course fully embraces ‘Student as Producer’ as an organising principle.

Features

The design process utilised on the course is based on the imaginal strategy defined by Konigk (2015) and Scott’s (2008) process of altering architecture.

The programme is focused on the critical response to cultural heritage: students produce contemporary and progressive interior outputs. All modes of alteration (installation, insertion, intervention) and additions are possible, but preservation and new build is prohibited. The emphasis is on change of use adaptive-reuse (which distinguishes interior architecture and design from conservation and architecture).

Postgraduate Events

Find out more about how postgraduate study can help further your career, develop your knowledge, or even prepare you to start your own business at one of our postgraduate events.

Find out More

Career Opportunities

The programme offers two pathways: Treatise by Practice and Treatise by Research. Both pathways are designed to provide a platform to progress to further employment in interior consultancies or to advanced study at doctoral level.

The treatise that is prepared as the result of the practice route displays the characteristics of a ‘professional master’s degree’ as defined by the QAA (2015:5): it aims to enable graduates to qualify for entry into the profession of interior design (this may be subject to the requirements of the profession in various jurisdictions) and to provide development opportunities related to advanced employment in interior design.

The treatise that is prepared as the result of the research route displays the characteristics of an ‘advanced study master’s degree’ as defined by the QAA (2015:4): it aims to prepare graduates to advance their careers through further academic or professional study or for entering employment of a different kind in interior design.

Related Courses

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.
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