18th February 2014, 10:24am
Coding crash course for techie youngsters
Students at the workshop Young people who will be studying at Lincoln’s new University Technical College were given a crash course in computer programming from experts at the University of Lincoln’s School of Computer Science.

During the workshop on Monday, 17th February, the pupils completed a set of programming challenges using a Raspberry Pi - a credit-card-sized computer developed with the intention of promoting the teaching of basic computer science in schools.

Dr John Murray, senior lecturer in the School of Computer Science, taught the young people how the Raspberry Pi can be used to develop real-world applications.

Tasks included creating a WiiPi, attaching sensors to the Raspberry Pi to allow it to function in much the same way as the popular Wii games controller.

Dr Murray said: “This kind of activity shows young people that by using fairly simple technology and learning a small amount of programming they can create things, such as a basic computer game. It’s important the pupils see how this technology can be used in day to day life.

“Getting them involved in sessions like this makes them realise that science is not as complicated as they think it is and it can actually be fun.”

Students will return in a few weeks’ time to further develop their skills and demonstrate their new skills in programming to members of the School of Computer Science.

The Lincoln University Technical College (UTC), which is jointly supported by Lincoln College, the University of Lincoln and Siemens in Lincoln, will specialise in engineering and core science.

A new concept in education, UTCs offer 14-19-year-olds the opportunity to take a highly regarded, full-time, technically-oriented course of study.

They are equipped to the highest standard, sponsored by a university and employers to offer clear progression routes into higher education or further learning in work.
The Lincoln UTC will enrol its first intake of pupils in September 2014.

Andrew Wright, Vice Principal of the Lincoln UTC, said: “Students had a fantastic time getting their teeth into the applications of computing and cannot wait to get through the doors of the UTC in September.”
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