22nd August 2013, 9:32am
Lincoln ecologist wins British Ecological Society Award
Prof Georgina Mace presenting Dr Libby John with the award Dr Libby John, head of the School of Life Sciences at the University of Lincoln, UK, has been recognised for her exceptional service to the British Ecological Society.

Dr John received the award at INTECOL, the world’s largest ecological meeting, hosted by the British Ecological Society (BES), at ExCel, London on 21st August.

She said: “I am incredibly honoured to receive this award. I have been a member of the Society since my PhD days and I have gained so much from the opportunities that being a member of a successful and well-run learned society have brought me.  It has been a real privilege to contribute to running the BES as a Council Member and Honorary Chair of the Education Training and Careers Committee.”

A spokesman for the BES said: “Dr John – an outstanding plant ecologist – was awarded the prize for her exceptional commitment to supporting and inspiring the next generation of ecological researchers. Her contributions to the BES have been valuable and long-standing. At a time when education in the UK is facing rapid changes, Dr John led the Society’s education activities and made significant impacts on the national education policy. She implemented expanding programmes of support for undergraduates and PhD students here in the UK and abroad.”

Also attending the event were three University of Lincoln students – two undergraduates benefiting from the BES undergraduate fellowship which gives promising early career students the opportunity to experience a top scientific meeting, and one research student who has also benefited from funding provided by the Society.

The British Ecological Society is the oldest ecological society in the world. Founded in 1913 by Sir Arthur Tansley, the BES is celebrating its centenary in 2013 with a series of special events designed to give everyone the chance to get involved in ecology. Anyone interested in ecology can join the BES, which through its 3,500 members champions ecological research, teaching, public engagement and policy.
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