21st June 2010, 9:15am
Spotlight on Lincoln in national ‘town and gown’ report
Living Together Working Together The good relationship the University of Lincoln and its students have built with the local community has been highlighted in a national report.

Living Together, Working Together details a number of successful university initiatives that have been established to address the so-called 'town and gown' divide. It illustrates how universities and students' unions have worked together to improve relations between student populations and local residents in towns and cities across the UK.

Director of Student Services at the University, Judith Carey, said: “I'm delighted that the partnership work of the Students’ Union and the University, with all members of the Carholme Community Forum, has been highlighted as good practice in this excellent report.

“Students are a very important part of the community in Lincoln and contribute hugely to creating a vibrant and diverse community. We will continue to develop our partnerships with Community groups, using some of the great ideas in this report that have been tried by other Universities."

The report recognises that, in certain areas, the increase in student numbers has had a negative impact on relations between students and local residents, as university housing stock has been exceeded and significant numbers of students have moved into houses in the neighbouring streets and towns.

Nicola Dandridge, Chief Executive of Universities UK, said: “The so-called town and gown divide has existed for centuries, but it is only in recent years that it has been properly addressed by both universities and students’ unions.

“The benefits that students bring to towns and cities are well known. For example, the 67,000 students who volunteer every year and the significant income students bring to the local economy. In the past, some of the negative impacts have sometimes been swept under the carpet, but as this report shows, there is now a genuine appetite by universities and students' unions to address residents' concerns."

Susan Nash, Vice-President (Society & Citizenship) of NUS, said: “This publication sends a positive message about how we can make a difference when we work together. The case studies included in this report highlight how students are working hard to tackle the issues that their neighbourhoods face and ensure that the diversity of skills and experiences are shared with the wider community.”

The report is the first joint publication produced by NUS, Universities UK (UUK) and GuildHE.
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