8th April 2009, 9:23am
Show puts spotlight on Lincolnshire landscape
Show puts spotlight on Lincolnshire landscape The sights, sounds and stories of the Lincolnshire landscape are the inspiration for an exhibition which will be held at the University of Lincoln from 8-15 May.

The show, Unearthing: Explorations in the Lincolnshire landscape, is the result of an innovative venture involving journalism and arts students from the University.

The exhibition, in the Media, Humanities and Technology building on the Brayford campus, will be opened by Jeremy Webster, District Manager for Culture and Adult Education at Lincolnshire County Council, and will incorporate text, images and sound pieces inspired by the Lincolnshire landscape.

The project, specially funded by the University, was designed to give students from Fine Art, Creative Lens Media and the School of Journalism an opportunity to work together and draw inspiration from the Lincolnshire landscape.

At the launch of the project in January, the students went to Home Farm, Withcall, Brackenborough Hall, near Louth, Mablethorpe and Anderby Creek. At both Home Farm and Brackenborough Hall they had the opportunity to speak to the farmers about contemporary farming life and issues that impact on the farming year.

The students were asked to work in groups responding to one of the many aspects of Lincolnshire they encountered over the day. They have selected very different environments and issues to work from – such as old railway lines, the coast at Anderby Creek, the West Common, Lincoln, the impact of a lifetime in farming on an individual, and badgers.
One of the project leaders, Professor Richard Keeble, from the School of Journalism, said: “Too often journalism operates as a metropolitan activity. As a result, the land and the farming community get forgotten. This project was truly innovative in that it encouraged students to take a real interest in the local countryside and collaborate with students from a completely different discipline. Their responses are fascinating.”

Commenting on the students’ work, Dr. Mary O’Neill, Senior Lecturer in Critical Analysis and Cultural Context in the Lincoln School of Art and Design, said: “This project gave the students the opportunity to become acquainted with a small fragment of what is a very inspiring county. The diverse work they produced reflects that inspiration and is I hope the beginning of a much longer relationship with the Lincolnshire landscape.”

Staff, students and members of the public are welcome to view the exhibition. For more details contact Professor Keeble at rkeeble@lincoln.ac.uk or Mary O’Neill at moneill@lincoln.ac.uk.
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