19th March 2004

 

RECOGNITION FOR UNIVERSITY VET

 

A leading scientist at the University of Lincoln has become the first veterinary surgeon in the country to be officially recognised as a specialist in veterinary behavioural medicine.

 

The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) has recognised the work of Dr Daniel Mills, a veterinary surgeon based in the university’s Department of Biological Sciences at Riseholme Park.

 

Dr Mills lectures on companion animal behaviour and welfare and also runs the university’s animal  behaviour clinic for problem pets.

 

“This is the first time the Royal College of  Veterinary Surgeons has recognised the specialism of behavioural medicine in vets,” said Dr Mills.

 

“It’s a great personal achievement for me to be the first in the field to be recognised in this way. It’s also a big step forward for the profession as this discipline is an integral part of animal health and welfare, but it has generally been under-recognised for many years.

 

“And of course it’s a real coup for the university and for Lincoln to have the only recognised specialist in this subject in the UK working here.”

 

Dr Mills qualified as a veterinary surgeon in 1990 and earned his PhD at De Montfort University in the management of a range of behaviour problems in the horse.

 

He now provides consultancy to organisations in the animal care and science industries and co-ordinates independent trials of potential new products in addition to developing his own initiatives which focus on improving behaviour without compromising welfare.

 

He was instrumental in setting up the Companion Animal Behaviour Therapy Study Group and the Biennial International Conference on Behaviour for the veterinary profession and has published  more than 60 scientific papers and abstracts over the years.

 

In addition to numerous chapter authorships he is principal author of the text ‘Equine Behaviour, Principles and Practice’ and co-editor of the BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Behavioural Medicine and a new text on the behaviour and welfare domestic horse to be published later this year.

 

He is currently working as editor-in-chief on a new Encyclopaedia of Applied Animal Behaviour and Welfare. His contribution to the field was also recently recognised with an entry into the current edition of Marquis Who’s Who in the World

 

 

For more information contact: Jez Ashberry, Press and Media Relations Manager

University of Lincoln (tel: 01522 886042)                       email: jashberry@lincoln.ac.uk

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