BA (Hons) Design for Exhibition and Museums

BA (Hons) Design for Exhibition and Museums

The University of Lincoln ranked 7th in the UK for overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2018 (out of 127 institutions).

The Course

Design for Exhibition and Museums specialises in ‘storytelling’, whether for a brand, a collection or an idea. Projects integrate aspects of graphic, spatial and interactive design. Students work on creative briefs, including designs for commercial projects such as trade stands and brand experiences, as well as exhibition projects for visitor attractions, museums and theme parks.

Students can explore how to construct a narrative that acts as an ‘interpretive bridge’ between the client and the audience. The outcome is the creation of interactive spaces that communicate messages in a memorable and innovative manner. The course is shaped by long-established links with the exhibitions industry, museums and heritage organisations.

The Course

Design for Exhibition and Museums focuses on the design of engaging, narrative environments for commercial exhibitions, events and museums, and offers a bridging of artistic disciplines in a creative, spatial design programme.

The course specialises in ‘storytelling’, whether for a brand, a collection or an idea. Projects integrate aspects of graphic, spatial and interactive design. Students work on creative briefs, including designs for commercial projects such as trade stands and brand experiences, as well as exhibition projects for visitor attractions, museums and theme parks.

Students can explore how to construct a narrative that acts as an ‘interpretive bridge’ between the client and the audience. The outcome is the creation of interactive spaces that communicate messages in a memorable and innovative manner. The course is shaped by long-established links with the exhibitions industry, museums and heritage organisations.

The first year focuses on three-dimensional design skills and aims to ensure students become increasingly aware of the social and contextual factors of design production, in addition to gaining a thorough introduction to the importance of visual literacy and spatial awareness. In the studio, students can develop drawing and modelling techniques, as well as the ability to address communication and spatial problems creatively.

In the second year, the focus is solely on exhibition briefs and students can explore how narrative, multi-media and interactive design can enhance visitor experiences. There is also the opportunity to gain practical work experience through optional placements in year two.

The final year concentrates on areas of personal interest with opportunities to develop briefs for exhibition projects, culminating in a final showcase exhibition. Additionally, the course offers live projects and the opportunity for collaborations with established practices and museums, as well as feedback from practising designers in our Industry Forum in the final year.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Design Process 1.1: Fundamentals and Skills (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 1.1: Fundamentals and Skills (Core)

An introduction to conceptual and creative processes in design production; thinking through drawing. Essential two- and three-dimensional skills and manipulation of space; this includes a consideration of design- and spatial elements, platonic solids, spatial composition & Boolean operations, scale, and representation.

Design Process 1.2: Application and Communication (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 1.2: Application and Communication (Core)

Visual narratives, as the expression of stories through visual media, are introduced by considering the individual in the environment. Students are introduced to interior and exhibition typologies as a possible design strategy. The modes of production for responsive spatial disciplines are introduced: installation, insertion, and intervention.

Design Process 1.3: Consolidation and Agency (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 1.3: Consolidation and Agency (Core)

Critical heritage, as the interplay between tradition and contemporary life, is introduced by considering society in the environment. Spatial identity through the application of design elements. The investigation of design precedents and the identification of conceptual links therein. Design distribution and the influence of related disciplines. The focus is on installation or insertion as modes of production which included temporary, transitory, mobile, or transient typologies. The design of a small volumetric environment in a defined physical context.

Research Process 1: Principles and Concepts (Core)
Find out more

Research Process 1: Principles and Concepts (Core)

Design is considered as a form of inquiry to introduce research methods. An awareness of qualitative and quantitative methods and their application is instilled. The theoretical and pragmatic informants of design production are introduced. Students are made aware of the utopian and ontological aspects of normative positions as generators for design.

Design Process 2.1: Strategy and Concept (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 2.1: Strategy and Concept (Core)

The module is presented from a conceptual and strategic point of departure to develop and enhance previously acquired fundamental design skills. The focus is on insertion as a mode of production which considers issue, type, user/audience, theory/concept, and site/venue. Content analysis, interpretation and thematic planning is to focus on the user/audience or content as design generators.

Design Process 2.2 B: Space and Technology (Exchange Option) (Option)
Find out more

Design Process 2.2 B: Space and Technology (Exchange Option) (Option)

The module takes the integration of behavior, narrative and technology into account when developing spatial proposals. The built environment or contextual brief is considered as a cultural artefact which is informed by its context. Insertion is the mode of production under consideration which includes long-lived typologies.

Design Process 2.2: Space and Technology (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 2.2: Space and Technology (Core)

The module takes the integration of behavior, narrative and technology into account when developing spatial proposals. The built environment or contextual brief is considered as a cultural artefact which is informed by its context. Insertion is the mode of production under consideration which includes long-lived typologies.

Design Process 2.3: Technical Resolution (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 2.3: Technical Resolution (Core)

The technical resolution and communication of a previously developed design concept or new project. The module is student-led with a concentration on design development, detail, and specificity.

Research Process 2 B: Methods and Perspectives (Exchange Option) (Option)
Find out more

Research Process 2 B: Methods and Perspectives (Exchange Option) (Option)

Selected visual research methods are covered in greater depth. The relationship between theory and practice is considered. Students are introduced to meta-theoretical perspectives and expected to formulate their own normative positions in response to context and paradigm.

Research Process 2: Methods and Perspectives (Core)
Find out more

Research Process 2: Methods and Perspectives (Core)

Selected visual research methods are covered in greater depth. The relationship between theory and practice is considered. Students are introduced to meta-theoretical perspectives and expected to formulate their own normative positions in response to context and paradigm.

Study Period Abroad - Design (Option)
Find out more

Study Period Abroad - Design (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for students in the Lincoln School of Design to spend a semester in Year 2 studying at one of the University’s partner institutions. In academic terms, during the semester abroad students undertake a course load at the partner institution of equivalent standard to that of the semester A programme at Lincoln.

Participation in study-abroad also offers unique opportunities for personal student development. Although students will be supported through the application process by the module coordinator and colleagues at the partner institution, much of the responsibility for organising the time abroad rests with students. Study abroad offers the basic experience of adapting to and working effectively within a different academic culture.

A limited number of places will be available each year, and participation is subject to the School's approval, based on the above and on students’ records of attendance, academic achievement, and participation.

The Placement Year (Option)
Find out more

The Placement Year (Option)

The Work Placement Year aims to give students a continuous experience of full-time work within an organisation. It should be a three-way co-operative activity between employer, student and University from which all parties benefit. It is more than simply obtaining work during a gap in study – work placements should enable students to experience at first hand the daily workings of an organisation while setting that experience in the broader context of their studies.

The Work Placement Year constitutes a minimum of 24 weeks work placement during an academic year, funded by full-time paid employment, normally taking place between year 2 and year 3. (It should be noted that leave does not count as part of the 24 weeks.)

All students on the Work Placement Year as part of their full-time undergraduate study will remain enrolled with the University during the period of placement and receive support. Students originally enrolled on 3 year programmes wishing to transfer to the 4 year programme must do so before the commencement of their placement, should gain the consent of their funders, where appropriate, and advise the University of their intentions before the September enrolment.

Students on three-year programmes who suspend their studies for a year to gain work experience will not be officially recognised as placement students on the Placement Year, will not be enrolled for the Work Placement Year will not be supported by the University and are not considered as students of the University for that year.

Exhibition Design Process 3.1: Autonomous Project (Core)
Find out more

Exhibition Design Process 3.1: Autonomous Project (Core)

Students respond to a pre-defined project brief for a small-scale communicative environment. The project requires conceptual thinking and the spatial translation of design intentions. This project offers an opportunity to add a distinctive project to the final year portfolio and illustrate proficiency in a specific are oaf design practice.

Exhibition Design Process 3.2: Concept and Design Development (Core)
Find out more

Exhibition Design Process 3.2: Concept and Design Development (Core)

Students develop a scheme design for a self-directed medium scale communicative design project, which forms the basis of the exhibition Design Treatise. The module incorporates interpretive and thematic planning, strategic and conceptual thinking, and the spatial translation of design intentions.

Exhibition Design Process 3.3: Technical Design and Communication (Core)
Find out more

Exhibition Design Process 3.3: Technical Design and Communication (Core)

The detailed exploration and communication of a complete design resolution for a previously defined and developed communicative environment.

Research Process 3: Design Exegesis (Core)
Find out more

Research Process 3: Design Exegesis (Core)

Students are expected to complete a large scale self-directed research study to support the design treatise.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

For this course assessment is 100% by coursework in each year. The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports, projects, or reviews of creative output. The University of Lincoln’s policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Successful applicants will be invited for interview, where they will have the opportunity to go through their portfolio with a member of the academic team.

With regard to your portfolio, you should include examples of your practical art and design skills, which will vary according to your current art and design studies and prior experience of these subjects.

We have applicants from a broad range of art and design subject areas and what we are mainly looking for is passion and genuine enthusiasm for exhibition and/or museum design.

Your portfolio may include (but not exclusively) examples of observational drawing, design project work, painting and sculpture, textile works, design development drawing, photography, model-making, use of colour, perspective drawing and technical drawing. Please bring any sketchbooks and design development work you have. Your portfolio should not exceed 15 pieces of work plus sketchbooks and supporting work as appropriate.

Professional Experience

  • Expert visiting lectures from commercial design practices and museums.
  • Interdisciplinary studio environment which has strong links with Interior Architecture and Design (including a shared programme in year one)
  • Work placement in year two to introduce students to the industry. Potential costs relating to the placement can be found below.
  • British Museum internship opportunity in year two as part of a unique partnership with the course.
  • Live projects and collaborations with established practices and museums.
  • An Industry Forum in year three where students have the opportunity to get direct feedback from practising designers.
  • A Final Show in year three, which is a dedicated public showcase of student work.
  • Links with the Hong Kong Design Institute. A top-up degree is presented in Hong Kong, paving the way for student exchange opportunities. Costs relating to study abroad opportunities are outlined in the Fees tab.

Adobe Creative Cloud

Students on this course will receive a licence for Adobe Creative Cloud free of charge.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

Students may be invited to join optional field trips. Attendance on these trips has no impact upon grades. Students on optional trips will be expected to cover travel and meal costs, which will vary depending on the destination. In the second year there is also the opportunity to take part in an optional residential trip. For this, students will be responsible for the costs of their accommodation, in addition to travel and meal costs.

Students may also need to cover the costs of materials of their choice. Costs for the year three Final Show are generally covered by fundraising, however some students may choose to contribute funds for optional extras.

Study abroad outside of Europe

Exchange students applying to study outside of Europe do not pay tuition fees at their host university.

Participants will usually be responsible for all other costs themselves, including travel, accommodation, visas, insurance, vaccinations and administrative fees at the host institution.

Students going on exchange keep their entitlement to UK sources of funding such as student loans and should apply to their awarding body in the normal way, indicating that they will be studying abroad.

If your time away is a mandatory part of your degree programme, you may be entitled to extra funding. You should ask your funding body about this.

You may also be able to apply to your Local Education Authority or the Student Awards Agency for Scotland for further funding to assist with travel expenses - contact them to enquire.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC.

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall.

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above.

All applicants will be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above, including English.

Mature students with extensive relevant work experience and a portfolio of work, will be selected on individual merit. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Arts Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/AFYAFYUB/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

The first year focuses on three-dimensional design skills and aims to ensure students become increasingly aware of the social and contextual factors of design production, in addition to gaining a thorough introduction to the importance of visual literacy and spatial awareness. In the studio, students can develop drawing and modelling techniques, as well as the ability to address communication and spatial problems creatively.

In the second year, the focus is solely on exhibition briefs and students can explore how narrative, multi-media and interactive design can enhance visitor experiences. There is the opportunity to gain practical work experience through an optional work placement year between years two and three.

The final year concentrates on areas of personal interest with opportunities to develop briefs for exhibition projects, culminating in a final showcase exhibition. Additionally, the course offers live projects and the opportunity for collaborations with established practices and museums, as well as feedback from practising designers in our Industry Forum in the final year.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Design Process 1.1: Fundamentals and Skills (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 1.1: Fundamentals and Skills (Core)

An introduction to conceptual and creative processes in design production; thinking through drawing. Essential two- and three-dimensional skills and manipulation of space; this includes a consideration of design- and spatial elements, platonic solids, spatial composition & Boolean operations, scale, and representation.

Design Process 1.2: Application and Communication (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 1.2: Application and Communication (Core)

Visual narratives, as the expression of stories through visual media, are introduced by considering the individual in the environment. Students are introduced to interior and exhibition typologies as a possible design strategy. The modes of production for responsive spatial disciplines are introduced: installation, insertion, and intervention.

Design Process 1.3: Consolidation and Agency (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 1.3: Consolidation and Agency (Core)

Critical heritage, as the interplay between tradition and contemporary life, is introduced by considering society in the environment. Spatial identity through the application of design elements. The investigation of design precedents and the identification of conceptual links therein. Design distribution and the influence of related disciplines. The focus is on installation or insertion as modes of production which included temporary, transitory, mobile, or transient typologies. The design of a small volumetric environment in a defined physical context.

Research Process 1: Principles and Concepts (Core)
Find out more

Research Process 1: Principles and Concepts (Core)

Design is considered as a form of inquiry to introduce research methods. An awareness of qualitative and quantitative methods and their application is instilled. The theoretical and pragmatic informants of design production are introduced. Students are made aware of the utopian and ontological aspects of normative positions as generators for design.

Design Process 2.1: Strategy and Concept (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 2.1: Strategy and Concept (Core)

The module is presented from a conceptual and strategic point of departure to develop and enhance previously acquired fundamental design skills. The focus is on insertion as a mode of production which considers issue, type, user/audience, theory/concept, and site/venue. Content analysis, interpretation and thematic planning is to focus on the user/audience or content as design generators.

Design Process 2.2 B: Space and Technology (Exchange Option) (Option)
Find out more

Design Process 2.2 B: Space and Technology (Exchange Option) (Option)

The module takes the integration of behavior, narrative and technology into account when developing spatial proposals. The built environment or contextual brief is considered as a cultural artefact which is informed by its context. Insertion is the mode of production under consideration which includes long-lived typologies.

Design Process 2.2: Space and Technology (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 2.2: Space and Technology (Core)

The module takes the integration of behavior, narrative and technology into account when developing spatial proposals. The built environment or contextual brief is considered as a cultural artefact which is informed by its context. Insertion is the mode of production under consideration which includes long-lived typologies.

Design Process 2.3: Technical Resolution (Core)
Find out more

Design Process 2.3: Technical Resolution (Core)

The technical resolution and communication of a previously developed design concept or new project. The module is student-led with a concentration on design development, detail, and specificity.

Research Process 2 B: Methods and Perspectives (Exchange Option) (Option)
Find out more

Research Process 2 B: Methods and Perspectives (Exchange Option) (Option)

Selected visual research methods are covered in greater depth. The relationship between theory and practice is considered. Students are introduced to meta-theoretical perspectives and expected to formulate their own normative positions in response to context and paradigm.

Research Process 2: Methods and Perspectives (Core)
Find out more

Research Process 2: Methods and Perspectives (Core)

Selected visual research methods are covered in greater depth. The relationship between theory and practice is considered. Students are introduced to meta-theoretical perspectives and expected to formulate their own normative positions in response to context and paradigm.

Study Period Abroad - Design (Option)
Find out more

Study Period Abroad - Design (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for students in the Lincoln School of Design to spend a semester in Year 2 studying at one of the University’s partner institutions. In academic terms, during the semester abroad students undertake a course load at the partner institution of equivalent standard to that of the semester A programme at Lincoln.

Participation in study-abroad also offers unique opportunities for personal student development. Although students will be supported through the application process by the module coordinator and colleagues at the partner institution, much of the responsibility for organising the time abroad rests with students. Study abroad offers the basic experience of adapting to and working effectively within a different academic culture.

A limited number of places will be available each year, and participation is subject to the School's approval, based on the above and on students’ records of attendance, academic achievement, and participation.

The Placement Year (Option)
Find out more

The Placement Year (Option)

The Work Placement Year aims to give students a continuous experience of full-time work within an organisation. It should be a three-way co-operative activity between employer, student and University from which all parties benefit. It is more than simply obtaining work during a gap in study – work placements should enable students to experience at first hand the daily workings of an organisation while setting that experience in the broader context of their studies.

The Work Placement Year constitutes a minimum of 24 weeks work placement during an academic year, funded by full-time paid employment, normally taking place between year 2 and year 3. (It should be noted that leave does not count as part of the 24 weeks.)

All students on the Work Placement Year as part of their full-time undergraduate study will remain enrolled with the University during the period of placement and receive support. Students originally enrolled on 3 year programmes wishing to transfer to the 4 year programme must do so before the commencement of their placement, should gain the consent of their funders, where appropriate, and advise the University of their intentions before the September enrolment.

Students on three-year programmes who suspend their studies for a year to gain work experience will not be officially recognised as placement students on the Placement Year, will not be enrolled for the Work Placement Year will not be supported by the University and are not considered as students of the University for that year.

Exhibition Design Process 3.1: Autonomous Project (Core)
Find out more

Exhibition Design Process 3.1: Autonomous Project (Core)

Students respond to a pre-defined project brief for a small-scale communicative environment. The project requires conceptual thinking and the spatial translation of design intentions. This project offers an opportunity to add a distinctive project to the final year portfolio and illustrate proficiency in a specific are oaf design practice.

Exhibition Design Process 3.2: Concept and Design Development (Core)
Find out more

Exhibition Design Process 3.2: Concept and Design Development (Core)

Students develop a scheme design for a self-directed medium scale communicative design project, which forms the basis of the exhibition Design Treatise. The module incorporates interpretive and thematic planning, strategic and conceptual thinking, and the spatial translation of design intentions.

Exhibition Design Process 3.3: Technical Design and Communication (Core)
Find out more

Exhibition Design Process 3.3: Technical Design and Communication (Core)

The detailed exploration and communication of a complete design resolution for a previously defined and developed communicative environment.

Research Process 3: Design Exegesis (Core)
Find out more

Research Process 3: Design Exegesis (Core)

Students are expected to complete a large scale self-directed research study to support the design treatise.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

For this course assessment is 100% by coursework in each year. The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports, projects, or reviews of creative output. The University of Lincoln’s policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Successful applicants will be invited for interview, where they will have the opportunity to go through their portfolio with a member of the academic team.

With regard to your portfolio, you should include examples of your practical art and design skills, which will vary according to your current art and design studies and prior experience of these subjects.

We have applicants from a broad range of art and design subject areas and what we are mainly looking for is passion and genuine enthusiasm for exhibition and/or museum design.

Your portfolio may include (but not exclusively) examples of observational drawing, design project work, painting and sculpture, textile works, design development drawing, photography, model-making, use of colour, perspective drawing and technical drawing. Please bring any sketchbooks and design development work you have. Your portfolio should not exceed 15 pieces of work plus sketchbooks and supporting work as appropriate.

Professional Experience

  • Expert visiting lectures from commercial design practices and museums.
  • Interdisciplinary studio environment which has strong links with Interior Architecture and Design (including a shared programme in year one).
  • Opportunity to take a work placement year between years two and three can help students to gain practical experience. Potential costs relating to the placement can be found below.
  • British Museum internship opportunity in year two as part of a unique partnership with the course.
  • Live projects and collaborations with established practices and museums.
  • An Industry Forum in year three where students have the opportunity to get direct feedback from practising designers.
  • A Final Show in year three, which is a dedicated public showcase of student work.
  • Links with the Hong Kong Design Institute. A top-up degree is presented in Hong Kong, paving the way for student exchange opportunities. Costs relating to study abroad opportunities are outlined in the Fees tab.

Adobe Creative Cloud

Students on this course are currently provided with free access to Adobe Creative Cloud and Autodesk software, as well as Lynda.com during their studies.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

There is the opportunity to gain practical work experience through an optional work placement year between years two and three.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

Students may be invited to join optional field trips. Attendance on these trips has no impact upon grades. Students on optional trips will be expected to cover travel and meal costs, which will vary depending on the destination. In the second year there is also the opportunity to take part in an optional residential trip. For this, students will be responsible for the costs of their accommodation, in addition to travel and meal costs.

Students may also need to cover the costs of materials of their choice. Costs for the year three Final Show are generally covered by fundraising, however some students may choose to contribute funds for optional extras.

Study abroad outside of Europe

Exchange students applying to study outside of Europe do not pay tuition fees at their host university.

Participants will usually be responsible for all other costs themselves, including travel, accommodation, visas, insurance, vaccinations and administrative fees at the host institution.

Students going on exchange keep their entitlement to UK sources of funding such as student loans and should apply to their awarding body in the normal way, indicating that they will be studying abroad.

If your time away is a mandatory part of your degree programme, you may be entitled to extra funding. You should ask your funding body about this.

You may also be able to apply to your Local Education Authority or the Student Awards Agency for Scotland for further funding to assist with travel expenses - contact them to enquire.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

EU and International students whose first language is not English will require English Language IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Arts Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/AFYAFYUB/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Tonia Warsap

Programme Leader

From her time in industry Tonia has gained a wealth of experience and first-hand knowledge of the fundamentals of interior architecture and design. At the University of Lincoln, she is Programme Leader of BA (Hons) Design for Exhibition and Museums and a Senior Lecturer.


Your Future Career

Owing to the multi-disciplinary approach of the course, graduates may choose to work on event, retail, theatre, exhibition or communication design-based projects.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for organisations including Eureka! The National Children’s Museum, Imagination, MET Studio, Kingsmen (Singapore) and the British Museum. Some students have gone on to study further at Master’s or PhD level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

Owing to the multi-disciplinary approach of the course, graduates may choose to work on event, retail, theatre, exhibition or communication design-based projects.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for organisations including Eureka! The National Children’s Museum, Imagination, MET Studio, Kingsmen (Singapore) and the British Museum. Some students have gone on to study further at Master’s or PhD level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

DEM - image for alumni quote

Design for Exhibition and Museums has the freedom to take you wherever you want to go within the narrative design world. The choice is both endless and entirely yours. It’s an unforgettable degree perfectly shaped within the design industry.

Claire Croucher, Design for Exhibition and Museums graduate

Facilities

Our purpose-built Art, Architecture and Design Building includes dedicated design studios, workshops and technology suites.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

Our library is open 24/7 for the majority of the academic year. Resources include more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.