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BSc (Hons)

BSc (Hons)

Select year of entry:
3-4 Years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated 280 points (See below) N820 3-4 Years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BBC (See below) N820

Introduction

Events Management at Lincoln aims to help aspiring events professionals to develop their creativity, organisational skills and practical problem-solving abilities while building a critical understanding of the theory behind successful events.

Events Management at Lincoln is a cross-disciplinary subject which gives students the opportunity to develop an understanding of events in a physical, social and cultural context. The course provides students with opportunities to undertake live projects and work placements to gain practical event experience.

Is This Course Right For Me?

This course is designed for those interested in understanding the economic and social imperatives of events and the theory and practice of events management.

How You Study

In the first year, the course introduces the broad subject areas that feed into the organisation and management of events, including financial communications, advertising, the experience economy and marketing.

The second year focuses more closely on specific events practices, and students can organise and host an assessed event. Students have the opportunity to focus more closely on events themselves, with modules on law for tourism and event managers, managing the environment and visitor experience. Students are also given the opportunity to organise and host an assessed event.

At this stage, students have the opportunity to study abroad for two terms at a partner institution and in the final year, students may write a dissertation or take part in a live consultancy project.

Students are invited to visit event locations and venues throughout the course. Costs for compulsory trips will be covered by the University but students will be required to meet some or all of the costs for optional trips.

Students who choose the option to study abroad are also required to pay any travel, accommodation and general living costs.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of your degree. However, remember that you are engaging in a full-time degree; so, at the very least, you should expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time and you may undertake assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Study

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Methods of Assessment

The way you will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln Business School Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2016-17

Applicants should have a minimum of 280 UCAS tariff points, including at least two (preferably three) full A Levels. They must also have a minimum of five GCSEs at grade C or above, including English Language and Maths.

We also accept a wide range of other qualifications including the BTEC Extended Diploma, Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma, the European and International Baccalaureate Diplomas, and Advanced Diplomas. You can find tariff values on the UCAS website http://lncn.eu/cdez

We encourage applications from mature students and we will give special individual consideration to those that are in this category and do not have the standard entry requirements.

Degree preparation courses for international students:

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Business of Event Management

This module is designed to serve as an introduction to the business of Events Management. Students can be introduced to the nature of the contemporary event industry, how it is conceived and how it has developed into a global industry. The focus is on the demand for events and the supply of the event product, examining the inter-relationships between the public, private and voluntary sectors in domestic and international event organisation.

There is also the opportunity to study the multi-faceted nature of events, both as an industry and as an emerging area for academic study. Emphasis will be placed upon the importance of using current contemporary sources in order to be able to comprehend the industry and the subject and to keep abreast of developments.

Students can gain insight into why people travel to and host events and emphasis will be placed on new event markets and the impacts of events at contrasting locations. The module aims to provide the opportunity to develop a discursive and analytical approach to evaluating the changing nature of event and related services.

Financial Communications

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the relevance of finance and accounting and some of the current issues facing business people.

This module is not an introduction to the technical side of accounting, rather; non-specialists have the opportunity to develop the ability to understand and comment upon issues which will arise upon pursuing a business career. Most organisations spend considerable time and money producing 'Financial Communications' and the module seeks to examine the underlying reasons behind this behaviour and the extent to which these communications achieve their objectives.

Introduction to Advertising (Option)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of communication and, more specifically, advertising. This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of a range of core communication models and theories, with the aim of enabling to analyse the likely impact of media messages on target audiences. The module aims to examine the theories of advertising and introduce the student to the various conceptual frameworks which attempt to explain how advertising works.

Investigating the Experience Economy (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to the tools of analysis required to research the supply of and demand for events within given geographical contexts.

It provides students with the opportunity to explore ways to collect, manage, analyse and interpret data, in order to follow the research process from start to finish. Students can develop and employ information technology skills to map, graph and interrogate secondary data from published sources and primary data collected by the students themselves.

Principles of Marketing

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of marketing. The aim is to familiarise students with the key concepts and issues of marketing, seeking to give them the chance to develop a thorough grasp of the sort of marketing decisions there are to be made and what factors affect them.

Space, Mobilities and the Experience Economy

With mobility, globalisation and technological advances shaping the landscape of the events and tourism industry, this module focuses on the relationship between places of residence and places of consumption (real and virtual) as well as the means of transportation between them.

In this module, we will discuss a range of theories, such as the experience economy and the network society, and use case studies to illustrate how these theoretical concepts work in practice. We will explore the role of place in the experience economy; the process of transformation of places into destinations and venues; the movement of people and the reasons behind these movements; the interlinking between tourism and events; and the activities undertaken at destinations and venues. The key trends in the global geography of tourism and events, both contemporary and forecast for the future, will be identified.

Level 2

Event Management (Option)

This module provides students with an opportunity to develop an insight into the management of events of various sizes and types. The emphasis is on design, production and innovation, which are necessary hallmarks of competitive events management.

Students are expected to be involved in practical work associated with designing, hosting and evaluating events. As such this module can provide opportunities to develop events management experience.

Human Resource Management For Tourism and Events

This module aims to examine the human side of management, and how this impacts on tourism and events related organisations: their staff, customers and other stakeholders.

The concept of customer care is universally understood and widely practised, particularly in the events industry, and yet there is a great deal of research evidence that shows that the perception of service in the sector by customers is still very poor. Whether this is a justifiable response to service standards or whether it is an issue of perception is debatable. If service levels are poor then there is a management challenge concerning leadership, motivation, teamwork and training.

Law for Tourism and Events Managers (Option)

This module aims to provide students with an opportunity to be introduced to the structure and legal frameworks within which the providers of tourism and events services are permitted to operate.

Students can be introduced to some of the basic principles and concepts of the English Legal System. Students have the opportunity to examine the major sources of English Law and to become familiar with the functioning of these in the context of a social and commercial environment. Students can also be introduced to the importance of European Law on the English Legal System and the increasing relevance of Human Rights Law.

Managing the Environment for Tourism and Events (Option)

This module aims to introduce some of the environmental problems associated with tourism and events, and the methods and strategies for environmental protection and management that are relevant to the industries. The focus will be on the management of businesses and operations. This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an overview of some of the practical methods available to the tourism and events industries to reduce the negative impacts on the environment, increase the chances of sustainability being achieved and raise awareness of the environmental issues specifically associated with the industries.

Research Methods for Tourism and Events (Option)

This module provides students with an opportunity to develop a range of research skills, both quantitative and qualitative. In so doing it aims to prepares students for their final year dissertation by giving them the chance to develop skills, ideas and confidence to undertake a major piece of primary research. The module also encourages students to evaluate research using the key concepts of reliability and validity.

Short Term Study Abroad (Option)

This exchange programme is an optional requirement for the award of the BA (Hons) International Business Management, BA (Hons) International Tourism Management and BSc (Hons) Events Management. The study placement takes place in terms 2 and 3 of the second year. During the period abroad students share classes with local students. The study placement can allow students to benefit from the opportunity to examine the nature of the business management, tourism and events businesses in their respective countries and to 'socialise' in another culture. Please note that students who choose to study abroad are required to pay any travel, accommodation and general living expenses.

Sponsorship and Corporate Hospitality (Option)

This module offers students the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding regarding the nature of sports sponsorship as a method of communication. The module also focuses on sponsorship planning, objective setting and evaluation. The module aims to cover the principles of buying and selling, activating, valuing and measuring sports sponsorships of all types, from global to local community, professional to grassroots, to accomplish sales, marketing, branding and other business objectives.

Students can be introduced to core hospitality services and have the opportunity to look at how a perspective sponsors/brands/buyers would compare opportunities with vastly different offerings and determine the most strategic fit and how to maximise return through effective activation. Students can also learn how to package and sell sports marketing and sponsorship programmes, including corporate hospitality packages, as well as servicing and renewing.

Understanding the Visitor Experience (Option)

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to be introduced to the nature of enjoyment. The nature of the consumer experience of presence at an event, or of participation in a holiday, is in essence identical: it is an experiential pleasure. This module offers an introduction to the current understandings of how people take in and make sense of these pleasures.

Level 3

Consultancy Project (Business) (Option)

This module has been designed so that students will be given the opportunity to work as Marketing/PR/Advertising consultants on a 'live' company project.

The overriding goal is for students to have the opportunity to experience real company problems first hand and to work in small groups to attempt to find information and ideas that offer meaningful solutions to the client company. It offers an opportunity to apply knowledge gained from the degree programme in a real world environment. This module seeks to bridge the gap between the classroom and industry and aims to directly prepare students for employability.

Consumer Culture (Option)

This module offers students the opportunity to examine the role of cultural change in shaping patterns of contemporary consumption. Students can undertake an analysis of contemporary culture, through which the emergence of present-day patterns of tourism and events consumption can be understood and explained.

Crisis and Disaster Management (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to explore the notion of risk and how this influences consumer behaviour and contemporary management practice. Through examination of a series of case studies, from organisations to places, it provides students with the chance to develop a critical understanding of risks, crises and disasters that can affect the events, tourism and sports industries.

Students have the opportunity to develop an understanding of contingency planning and crisis management practice in the 'experience' industries. The use of simulations and engagement with practitioners aims to enhance the students' practical knowledge of the processes and procedures associated with crisis management.

Students who take this optional module can choose to travel to Sri Lanka as part of an optional study visit. The cost of this trip is approximately £900 and students can pay in instalments. Attendance on this trip is not assessed.

Digital Economy and Digital Cultures (Option)

This module seeks to explore the interaction of contemporary cultural shifts (including networked and participatory cultures) and technological change. Students have the opportunity to engage with a range of web technologies as well as theoretical and managerial debates.

The emergence of a digital economy has significantly influenced the nature of events management and marketing. Predictions that the development of the Internet and associated technologies would replace the need for ‘live’ events and ‘face-to-face’ meetings and gatherings have not materialised. Rather cultural and technological shifts seem to have not only led to a further proliferation of events, but altered expectations as people place higher value on innovation and creativity.

Dissertation in Tourism and Sport Business Management (Option)

This double module occupies a central role in the final year as it provides the principal vehicle by which students have the opportunity to illustrate their ability to synthesise the differing disciplinary approaches and theoretical perspectives they have studied over three years. It aims to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competency as independent, reflective researchers.

Events and Sustainability

Sustainability and responsible management are key concepts for businesses and events organisers. Events manager have usually focused on the experiential aspects of events, and whilst they should be engaging and ‘fun’, increasingly we need to consider the wider impacts events have on the environment.

This module provides students with an opportunity to explore the nature of sustainable and responsible management, with the aim of helping to develop a critical understanding of the key issues and ideas underpinning this important shift in event management practice.

International case studies of different kinds events can be analysed to identify best practice and understand how events can sometimes fall short of expectations.

Planning and Evaluating Event Legacy

Events are multidimensional in nature, involving a range of stakeholders. This complicates evaluation as the ‘success’ of the event is viewed differently by different groups of stakeholders. Events can be evaluated from the perspective of the ‘business’ and/or the customer, but increasingly events organisers have to be able to justify events in a wider economic, environmental, socio-cultural and political contexts.

This module is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop the tools required to undertake and present critical event evaluation.

Strategic Management for Tourism and Events

This module aims to draw upon and integrate a range of business disciplines in examining the theory and practice of strategic management within a changing business environment. As well as examining the local and national dimensions of business strategy, the module recognises the increasingly international context of contemporary events. In so doing, the module seeks to bridge the gap between discrete functionalist disciplines and the broader issues involved in general business activity.

The learning programme focuses on encouraging students to critically evaluate of the nature of strategy, its' roles in contemporary events practice and the practical difficulties in formulating and implementing events strategies.

Special Features

Study Abroad

A number of our degrees include the opportunity to complete a study period abroad. Students on this course have the chance to spend around four months learning at an overseas university as part of our exchange programme.

The study placement takes place in the second semester of the second year. Students share classes with local students, allowing the opportunity to examine the nature of their chosen subject area in the host country, as well as the chance to socialise in another culture. Opportunities for study abroad are currently available in Mexico, China, India, Malaysia, USA, France, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Malta, Sweden and Finland.

Please note that there may be additional tuition fees associated with the Study Abroad scheme, based on where you choose to take your study placement. Students will also need to pay for all travel, accommodation and general living expenses while abroad.

Studying a Modern Language

This course also includes the option to develop language skills at no extra cost with opportunities to study French, German, Spanish or Mandarin Chinese.

Placements

Work Placement Year

Students have the opportunity to take a year-long work placement after the second year. A work placement can allow students to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. Some of our previous students have been offered a job with their placement employer before they graduate. Please note that students who choose to undertake a work placement do not pay tuition fees for that year, but are required to cover their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

There are also opportunities for relevant work experience and career development as part of the degree course itself, as well as through various other Lincoln Business School and University schemes. For more information about this please visit:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/lbs/workplacements/

Placement Year

When you are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, you will be required to cover your own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

This course is taught in the award-winning David Chiddick Building, which provides students with dedicated teaching and learning spaces, and comprises lecture theatres, workshop rooms, IT laboratories and a cafe.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever your area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which you may need in your future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

The events industry employs more than half a million people in the UK. Events Management at Lincoln aims to develop graduates with the strong portfolio and workplace experience that will enable them to undertake a range of roles in the events industry and adapt to the changing needs of the sector. Lincoln graduates have gone on to work in roles in events management, wedding organisation, marketing, public relations and corporate hospitality.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and your meals may be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional you will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay your own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

This BA (Hons) Business Studies degree combines elements of accountancy, finance, marketing, management and economics, and offers students the opportunity to develop the critical-thinking, problem-solving and analytical skills needed to enter the competitive world of business.
Lincoln’s BA (Hons) International Business Management course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid grounding in business process and mechanics, the skills to operate in a global environment and an in-depth understanding of the international marketplace.
The International Tourism Management degree at Lincoln is designed to provide an insight into the contemporary global tourism industry, including its impacts, interdependencies and importance to the economy. Tourism is one of the world’s fastest growing industries. It is worth billions to the global economy and can offer exciting career prospects.
Marketing defines the relationship between an organisation and its customers, cultivating demand for new and existing products and services. Successful marketing is both a science and an art, combining data-driven analysis with vision, insight and creativity.
The BA (Hons) Public Relations degree at Lincoln provides opportunities for students to learn a strategic approach to PR and benefit from an integrated multimedia approach to communications. The course draws on the disciplines of storytelling, crisis management, events and campaigning.

Introduction

Events Management at Lincoln aims to help aspiring events professionals to develop their creativity, organisational skills and practical problem solving abilities while building a critical understanding of the theory behind successful events.

Events Management at Lincoln is a cross-disciplinary subject which gives students the opportunity to develop an understanding of events in a physical, social and cultural context. The course provides students with opportunities to undertake live projects and work placements to gain practical event experience.

Is This Course Right For Me?

This course is designed for those interested in understanding the economic and social imperatives of events and the theory and practice of events management.

How You Study

In the first year, the course introduces the broad subject areas that feed into the organisation and management of events, including financial communications, advertising, the experience economy and marketing.

The second year focuses more closely on specific events practices, and students can organise and host an assessed event. Students have the opportunity to focus more closely on events themselves, with modules on law for tourism and event managers, managing the environment and visitor experience. Students are also given the opportunity to organise and host an assessed event.

At this stage, students have the opportunity to study abroad for two terms at a partner institution and in the final year, students may write a dissertation or take part in a live consultancy project.

Students are invited to visit event locations and venues throughout the course. Costs for compulsory trips will be covered by the University but students will be required to meet some or all of the costs for optional trips.

Students who choose the option to study abroad are also required to pay any travel, accommodation and general living costs.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of your degree. However, remember that you are engaging in a full-time degree; so, at the very least, you should expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time and you may undertake assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Study

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Methods of Assessment

The way you will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln Business School Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required.

In addition, applicants must have a minimum of five GCSEs (or the equivalent) at grade C or above, including English and Maths.

We encourage applications from mature students and we will give special individual consideration to those that are in this category and do not have the standard entry requirements.

Degree preparation courses for international students:

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Business of Event Management

This module is designed to serve as an introduction to the business of Events Management. Students can be introduced to the nature of the contemporary event industry, how it is conceived and how it has developed into a global industry. The focus is on the demand for events and the supply of the event product, examining the inter-relationships between the public, private and voluntary sectors in domestic and international event organisation.

There is also the opportunity to study the multi-faceted nature of events, both as an industry and as an emerging area for academic study. Emphasis will be placed upon the importance of using current contemporary sources in order to be able to comprehend the industry and the subject and to keep abreast of developments.

Students can gain insight into why people travel to and host events and emphasis will be placed on new event markets and the impacts of events at contrasting locations. The module aims to provide the opportunity to develop a discursive and analytical approach to evaluating the changing nature of event and related services.

Financial Communications

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the relevance of finance and accounting and some of the current issues facing business people.

This module is not an introduction to the technical side of accounting, rather; non-specialists have the opportunity to develop the ability to understand and comment upon issues which will arise upon pursuing a business career. Most organisations spend considerable time and money producing 'Financial Communications' and the module seeks to examine the underlying reasons behind this behaviour and the extent to which these communications achieve their objectives.

Introduction to Advertising (Option)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of communication and, more specifically, advertising. This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of a range of core communication models and theories, with the aim of enabling to analyse the likely impact of media messages on target audiences. The module aims to examine the theories of advertising and introduce the student to the various conceptual frameworks which attempt to explain how advertising works.

Investigating the Experience Economy (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to the tools of analysis required to research the supply of and demand for events within given geographical contexts. It provides students with the opportunity to explore ways to collect, manage, analyse and interpret data, in order to follow the research process from start to finish. Students can develop and employ information technology skills to map, graph and interrogate secondary data from published sources and primary data collected by the students themselves.

Principles of Marketing

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of marketing. The aim is to familiarise students with the key concepts and issues of marketing, seeking to give them the chance to develop a thorough grasp of the sort of marketing decisions there are to be made and what factors affect them.

Space, Mobilities and the Experience Economy

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop a geographical grounding for the experience economy. Both tourism and events assume mobility on the part of consumers, therefore the relationships between places of residence and places of consumption, as well as the means of transportation between them, form the focus of this module.

Students can explore the process of transformation of places into destinations and venues, the movement of people and the reasons behind these movements, and the activities undertaken at destinations and venues. The module seeks to answer questions such as which regions generate visitors, where visitors go, how they get there and home, and what they do while away.

Level 2

Event Management (Option)

This module provides students with an opportunity to develop an insight into the management of events of various sizes and types. The emphasis is on design, production and innovation, which are necessary hallmarks of competitive events management. Students are expected to be involved in practical work associated with designing, hosting and evaluating events. As such this module can provide opportunities to develop events management experience.

Human Resource Management For Tourism and Events

This module aims to examine the human side of management, and how this impacts on tourism and events related organisations: their staff, customers and other stakeholders. The concept of customer care is universally understood and widely practised, particularly in the events industry, and yet there is a great deal of research evidence that shows that the perception of service in the sector by customers is still very poor. Whether this is a justifiable response to service standards or whether it is an issue of perception is debatable. If service levels are poor then there is a management challenge concerning leadership, motivation, teamwork and training.

Law for Tourism and Events Managers (Option)

This module aims to provide students with an opportunity to be introduced to the structure and legal frameworks within which the providers of tourism and events services are permitted to operate.

Students can be introduced to some of the basic principles and concepts of the English Legal System. Students have the opportunity to examine the major sources of English Law and to become familiar with the functioning of these in the context of a social and commercial environment. Students can also be introduced to the importance of European Law on the English Legal System and the increasing relevance of Human Rights Law.

Managing the Environment for Tourism and Events (Option)

This module aims to introduce some of the environmental problems associated with tourism and events, and the methods and strategies for environmental protection and management that are relevant to the industries. The focus will be on the management of businesses and operations.

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop an overview of some of the practical methods available to the tourism and events industries to reduce the negative impacts on the environment, increase the chances of sustainability being achieved and raise awareness of the environmental issues specifically associated with the industries.

Research Methods for Tourism and Events (Option)

This module provides students with an opportunity to develop a range of research skills, both quantitative and qualitative. In so doing it aims to prepares students for their final year dissertation by giving them the chance to develop skills, ideas and confidence to undertake a major piece of primary research. The module also encourages students to evaluate research using the key concepts of reliability and validity.

Short Term Study Abroad (Option)

This exchange programme is an optional requirement for the award of the BA (Hons) International Tourism Management. The study placement takes place in terms 2 and 3 of the second year. During the period abroad students share classes with local students. The study placement can allow students to benefit from the opportunity to examine the nature of the tourism and events businesses in their respective countries and to 'socialise' in another culture. Please note that students who choose to study abroad are required to pay any travel, accommodation and general living expenses.

Sponsorship and Corporate Hospitality (Option)

This module offers students the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding regarding the nature of sports sponsorship as a method of communication. The module also focuses on sponsorship planning, objective setting and evaluation. The module aims to cover the principles of buying and selling, activating, valuing and measuring sports sponsorships of all types, from global to local community, professional to grassroots, to accomplish sales, marketing, branding and other business objectives.

Students can be introduced to core hospitality services and have the opportunity to look at how a perspective sponsors/brands/buyers would compare opportunities with vastly different offerings and determine the most strategic fit and how to maximise return through effective activation. Students can also learn how to package and sell sports marketing and sponsorship programmes, including corporate hospitality packages, as well as servicing and renewing.

Understanding the Visitor Experience (Option)

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to be introduced to the nature of enjoyment. The nature of the consumer experience of presence at an event, or of participation in a holiday, is in essence identical: it is an experiential pleasure. This module offers an introduction to the current understandings of how people take in and make sense of these pleasures.

Level 3

Consultancy Project (Business) (Option)

This module has been designed so that students will be given the opportunity to work as Marketing/PR/Advertising consultants on a 'live' company project.

The overriding goal is for students to have the opportunity to experience real company problems first hand and to work in small groups to attempt to find information and ideas that offer meaningful solutions to the client company. It offers an opportunity to apply knowledge gained from the degree programme in a real world environment. This module seeks to bridge the gap between the classroom and industry and aims to directly prepare students for employability.

Consumer Culture (Option)

This module offers students the opportunity to examine the role of cultural change in shaping patterns of contemporary consumption. Students can undertake an analysis of contemporary culture, through which the emergence of present-day patterns of tourism and events consumption can be understood and explained.

Crisis and Disaster Management (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to explore the notion of risk and how this influences consumer behaviour and contemporary management practice. Through examination of a series of case studies, from organisations to places, it provides students with the chance to develop a critical understanding of risks, crises and disasters that can affect the events, tourism and sports industries.

Students have the opportunity to develop an understanding of contingency planning and crisis management practice in the 'experience' industries. The use of simulations and engagement with practitioners aims to enhance the students' practical knowledge of the processes and procedures associated with crisis management.

Students who take this optional module can choose to travel to Sri Lanka as part of an optional study visit. The cost of this trip is approximately £900 and students can pay in instalments. Attendance on this trip is not assessed.

Digital Economy and Digital Cultures (Option)

This module seeks to explore the interaction of contemporary cultural shifts (including networked and participatory cultures) and technological change. Students have the opportunity to engage with a range of web technologies as well as theoretical and managerial debates.

The emergence of a digital economy has significantly influenced the nature of events management and marketing. Predictions that the development of the Internet and associated technologies would replace the need for ‘live’ events and ‘face-to-face’ meetings and gatherings have not materialised. Rather cultural and technological shifts seem to have not only led to a further proliferation of events, but altered expectations as people place higher value on innovation and creativity.

Dissertation in Tourism and Sport Business Management (Option)

This double module occupies a central role in the final year as it provides the principal vehicle by which students have the opportunity to illustrate their ability to synthesise the differing disciplinary approaches and theoretical perspectives they have studied over three years. It aims to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competency as independent, reflective researchers.

Events and Sustainability

Sustainability and responsible management are key concepts for businesses and events organisers. Events manager have usually focused on the experiential aspects of events, and whilst they should be engaging and ‘fun’, increasingly we need to consider the wider impacts events have on the environment.

This module provides students with an opportunity to explore the nature of sustainable and responsible management, with the aim of helping to develop a critical understanding of the key issues and ideas underpinning this important shift in event management practice.

International case studies of different kinds events can be analysed to identify best practice and understand how events can sometimes fall short of expectations.

Planning and Evaluating Event Legacy

Events are multidimensional in nature, involving a range of stakeholders. This complicates evaluation as the ‘success’ of the event is viewed differently by different groups of stakeholders. Events can be evaluated from the perspective of the ‘business’ and/or the customer, but increasingly events organisers have to be able to justify events in a wider economic, environmental, socio-cultural and political contexts.

This module is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop the tools required to undertake and present critical event evaluation.

Strategic Management for Tourism and Events

This module aims to draw upon and integrate a range of business disciplines in examining the theory and practice of strategic management within a changing business environment. As well as examining the local and national dimensions of business strategy, the module recognises the increasingly international context of contemporary events. In so doing, the module seeks to bridge the gap between discrete functionalist disciplines and the broader issues involved in general business activity.

The learning programme focuses on encouraging students to critically evaluate of the nature of strategy, its' roles in contemporary events practice and the practical difficulties in formulating and implementing events strategies.

Special Features

Study Abroad

A number of our degrees include the opportunity to complete a study period abroad. Students on this course have the chance to spend around four months learning at an overseas university as part of our exchange programme.

The study placement takes place in the second semester of the second year. Students share classes with local students, allowing the opportunity to examine the nature of their chosen subject area in the host country, as well as the chance to socialise in another culture. Opportunities for study abroad are currently available in Mexico, China, India, Malaysia, USA, France, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Malta, Sweden and Finland.

Please note that there may be additional tuition fees associated with the Study Abroad scheme, based on where you choose to take your study placement. Students will also need to pay for all travel, accommodation and general living expenses while abroad.

Studying a Modern Language

This course also includes the option to develop language skills at no extra cost with opportunities to study French, German, Spanish or Mandarin Chinese.

Placements

Work Placement Year

Students have the opportunity to take a year-long work placement after the second year. A work placement can allow students to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. Some of our previous students have been offered a job with their placement employer before they graduate. Please note that students who choose to undertake a work placement do not pay tuition fees for that year, but are required to cover their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

There are also opportunities for relevant work experience and career development as part of the degree course itself, as well as through various other Lincoln Business School and University schemes. For more information about this please visit:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/lbs/workplacements/

Placement Year

When you are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, you will be required to cover your own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

This course is taught in the award-winning David Chiddick Building, which provides students with dedicated teaching and learning spaces, and comprises lecture theatres, workshop rooms, IT laboratories and a cafe.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever your area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which you may need in your future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

The events industry employs more than half a million people in the UK. Events Management at Lincoln aims to develop graduates with the strong portfolio and workplace experience that will enable them to undertake a range of roles in the events industry and adapt to the changing needs of the sector. Lincoln graduates have gone on to work in roles in events management, wedding organisation, marketing, public relations and corporate hospitality.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and your meals may be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional you will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay your own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

This BA (Hons) Business Studies degree combines elements of accountancy, finance, marketing, management and economics, and offers students the opportunity to develop the critical-thinking, problem-solving and analytical skills needed to enter the competitive world of business.
Lincoln’s BA (Hons) International Business Management course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid grounding in business process and mechanics, the skills to operate in a global environment and an in-depth understanding of the international marketplace.
The International Tourism Management degree at Lincoln is designed to provide an insight into the contemporary global tourism industry, including its impacts, interdependencies and importance to the economy. Tourism is one of the world’s fastest growing industries. It is worth billions to the global economy and can offer exciting career prospects.
Marketing defines the relationship between an organisation and its customers, cultivating demand for new and existing products and services. Successful marketing is both a science and an art, combining data-driven analysis with vision, insight and creativity.
The BA (Hons) Public Relations degree at Lincoln provides opportunities for students to learn a strategic approach to PR and benefit from an integrated multimedia approach to communications. The course draws on the disciplines of storytelling, crisis management, events and campaigning.

Tuition Fees

2016/17 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,000 per level £12,800 per level
Part-time £75 per credit point  
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2017/18 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,000 per level £12,800 per level
Part-time £75 per credit point  
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For further information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions]