Course Information
Select year of entry:
3-4 years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated CCC (or equivalent qualifications) N290 3-4 years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated CCC (96 UCAS Tariff points) (or equivalent qualifications) N290

Introduction

The BA (Hons) Sports Business Management degree at Lincoln is designed for students seeking to critically examine the sports sector using tools from the international world of business. It aims to enable you to explore the policy, planning, impact, management and delivery of sporting opportunities, particularly in a commercial context and develop your skills for the critical analysis of sport, sport products, services and operations.

According to Standard Life, the business of sport was worth £20billion to the UK economy, generating over 450,000 jobs in 2015. Globally, PwC estimated that the market for sports was valued at over US$145 billion. Whilst, ticket revenues, sponsorship, TV rights and merchandising constitute main segments in high profile sports and sports clubs, even third sector and grassroots sports organisations require management and organisational skill. The world of sport provides not only potentially lucrative opportunities but also a fascinating context within which to study sport and develop business acumen.

The course offers the opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in relation to the sports industry – its connection to the socio-cultural environment, global structure and complexity, and the challenges and issues involved in reconciling government objectives with personal and community aspirations. Lincoln International Business School aims to enable you to develop a strong business acumen, transferable skills and confidence to engage with practitioner experiences.

How You Study

Students have the opportunity to take options from their second year onwards which allows for the development of particular expertise from various areas of the School (finance, HR, marketing, advertising or PR). The opportunity to undertake an optional 12-month work placement (Professional Practice) between Years 2 and 3 can allow students to further develop their sport business/management knowledge and transferable skills within a real work environment, whilst significantly enhancing their employability on completion of the programme.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

On each of our course pages you can find information on typical contact hours, modes of delivery and a breakdown of assessment methods. Where available, you will also be able to access a link to Unistats.com, where the latest data on student satisfaction and employability outcomes can be found.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln Business School Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: CCC

International Baccalaureate: 27 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Merit, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: Successful completion including 45 level 3 at pass.

In addition, applicants will also need a minimum of three GCSEs (or the equivalent) at grade C or above, including English and Maths.

We encourage applications from mature students and we will give special individual consideration to those who are in this category and do not have the standard entry requirements.

Degree preparation courses for international students:
The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Foundations of Sports Management (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the business of sport. Students can develop an understanding of the contexts within which sport business managers need to operate, the technological changes and innovations which affect the way sport is experienced and managed. The globalisation of sport business is explained along with changing governance structures.

There is an ever increasing demand to deliver effective sports management at international, nation, regional and local levels. This requires systems with accountable delivery mechanisms. Sport no longer stands alone and there is an increasing need to work in partnerships with other stakeholders. These partnerships not only provide a complex network structuring the management of sport business but also pressure it to be sustainable, equitable and empowering. Sports Business Managers need to be aware not only of the different contexts within which sport is managed, but also how responsible management can be practised.

Introduction to Advertising (Core)

This module examines the theories of advertising and introduces the students to the various conceptual frameworks which attempt to explain how advertising works. It provides an introduction to the different media. Emphasis is placed on the advertising agency, its relationship with their clients and the media selection and buying process. Issues such as how the advertising industry manages and regulates good practice are explored.

Introduction to Business Finance (Core)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to basic business finance for non-specialist students. The module explores the essential elements of business finance, which are required for a career in business, in any discipline.

Investigating the Experience Economy (Core)

This module will provide students with the opportunity to develop the skills and tools to give justification for their ideas within a business setting. It is more important than ever to be able to prove an increase in quality visitor experience; this can be measured via increased satisfaction levels, a rise in participation numbers or increased revenue into the organisation.

Organisational Behaviour (Core)

This module is intended for students who are interested in understanding the way people work, as individuals and as group members in firms. The module explores essential topics in a clear, concise and informative manner, aiming to introduce students to the interpersonal perceptual processes in a work environment; the key behavioural factors determining effective and ineffective groups; the usefulness of theories on leadership/management styles; and the difficulties in implementing change in organisations.

Principles of Marketing (Core)

This module of the programme is designed for students who have little or no marketing knowledge. The aim is to familiarise students with the key concepts and issues of marketing, giving them a thorough grasp of the sort of marketing decisions there are to be made and what factors affect them.

Sport Studies: Techniques and Applications (Core)

This module examines the ways of understanding and investigating sport in contemporary society. Students can develop the tools of analysis needed to investigate the world of sport. Through exploring how sport is structured and bounded by politics, power and societal change, students can develop an understanding about how the sports industry evolves. The market for sport is explored through the lens of institutional, psychological and societal drivers or barriers to sports participation. Issues of power, gender, race, disability and identity will be explored. Students will also be introduced to the sources and methods used in sports related research.

Level 2

Budgeting for Business (Option)

The module is designed to equip students with the understanding and skills to help them deal with the financial issues they will face in whatever business discipline they eventually practise. Issues include the use of budgeting as a motivational tool and the potential benefits of participation in the planning process.

Using variance analysis, we will consider how deviations from plan may be identified and explained, and how this may in turn be used to enhance future planning and performance.

Buyer Behaviour (Option)

This module is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to understand what buyer behaviour is, why it is important for marketers and organisations; and how to initiate customer research activities to explore the increasing complexity of customer behaviour. The focus will be primary on consumer behaviour, but in addition important attention will be paid to business and organisational buyer behaviour.

Commercial Sports Club Management (Core)

This module aims to develop knowledge of the structures, systems and operations of sports clubs, and examines methods and issues specific to the management of these clubs. It addresses issues of sports premises and facilities management, including environmental impacts and considerations. There is an examination of the major areas of club activity, including food and beverage provision, community interaction, and event/tournament management. The module also examines legal and financial considerations in the management of members and memberships, players, staff and visitors.

Corporate Reputation and Public Relations (Option)

This module aims to provide a critical understanding of corporate reputation and public relations (PR) with an emphasis on measuring and managing reputation in today’s increasingly connected word. We aim to provide students with the most up-to-date theories of corporate reputation following a hands-on approach where students are expected to apply their understanding of corporate reputation and PR to real-world case studies.

Cross Cultural Management (Option)

This module is designed for students who are thinking of a career in the international arena. It will be of use to anyone interested in working in multinationals or those interested in understanding how business is conducted across different cultures

Event Management (Option)

This module provides an insight into the strategic management of events of all sizes and types. The module provides a framework of the event planning process, using short and long-term strategies and an overview of operational strategies. Students are expected to organise an event of their own in this module and all that it entails. The event is assessed from conception through to operation and evaluation.

Finance for Business (Option)

The module is designed to equip students with understanding and skills to help them deal with the financial issues they will face in whatever business discipline they eventually practise. At its conclusion, students should have a solid understanding of the key elements of financial accounting and financial management that inform and affect the manager.

Human Resource Management For Tourism and Events (Core)

This module will examine the human side of management, and how this impacts on tourism and events related organisations: their staff, customers and other stakeholders. People are the primary focus for this module.

Media Planning for Advertising (Option)

This module aims to provide an insight into strategic media planning, emphasising critical thinking and applied analytical skills regarding strategic communication. The module will cover media research, evaluation, selection and planning as well as decision-making in the context of media planning. The module aims to develop the skills required for students interested in pursuing a career that requires media interaction.

Operations Management (Option)

This module is designed to introduce students to a wide range of Operations Management topics that contribute to an understanding of organisations as systems seeking to remain viable and competitive within their environment.

Principles of Project Management (Option)

This module aims to provide a solid foundation in the theory and best practice of project management, with the aim of developing the practical skills of how to plan, implement and control projects. The module provides students with the chance to develop an understanding of the system perspective on management and a practically oriented introduction to the nature and purpose of project management and its key functions (scope, time, cost, quality, risk).

Relational Strategies and Interactive Media (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding the various concepts associated with relationship marketing and direct marketing, and analysing how these impact on organisations in a marketing context. The module then provides the chance for students to develop an understanding of the role of interactive and traditional media for developing and maintaining relationships with customers.

Research Methods for Tourism and Events (Core)

This module provides students with an opportunity to develop a range of research skills, both quantitative and qualitative. In so doing it aims to prepares students for their final year dissertation by giving them the chance to develop skills, ideas and confidence to undertake a major piece of primary research. The module also encourages students to evaluate research using the key concepts of reliability and validity.

Sponsorship and Corporate Hospitality (Core)

This module introduces the differing models of sponsorship and how these can be adapted to suit a variety of corporate settings. Students will be expected to take full advantage of module visits and incorporate these experiences into academic research and writing. Corporation visits will be amalgamated with lectures and seminars relating to endorsements, ambush marketing and the relationship between sponsorship and corporate hospitality.

Sport, Society and Cultural Values (Core)

This module explores the ways in which contemporary sport is reflective of cultural values that are identifiable in wider society. A central component will be an examination of the way sport is presented in the present day media.

Sports Law (Core)

This module introduces students to the structure and legal frameworks within which sports and the sporting community is permitted to operate. The module presents students with a practical exposure to ‘applied law’. It shows how various branches of law such as contract, negligence, intellectual property and crime are applied in a sporting context. The module also explores various branches of the law operating within the sports arena.

Students are required to examine a range of public and social policy issues relating to the regulation, integrity and commercial nature of sports and identify instances of discrimination, inequality and breach of civil liberties in the sporting context. Students are also invited to explore some of the ethical issues which may arise in connection with the regulation and governance of sporting activities.

Tourism Enterprise Project (Option)

The basis of this module is that students work in groups of four to undertake a ‘live’ project, with a particular critical focus, for a tourism employer as client. Students are encouraged to think of themselves as graduate trainees, who under the direction of their tutor as project director, undertake research, evaluate and synthesise the information acquired, and present it to their client with recommendations.

Level 3

Consultancy Project (Business) (Option)

The Consultancy Project module provides the opportunity for students to work as Marketing/PR/Advertising consultants on a ‘live’ company project. The overriding goal is for students to experience real company problems first hand and to work in small groups to attempt to find information and ideas that offer meaningful solutions to the client company.

Students will have the chance to apply knowledge gained from the degree programme in a real world environment.

Consumer Culture (Option)

This module offers students the opportunity to examine the role of cultural change in shaping patterns of contemporary consumption. Students can undertake an analysis of contemporary culture, through which the emergence of present-day patterns of tourism and events consumption can be understood and explained.

Crisis Management (Option)

This module addresses the implications of interruption to business and the issues and problems that may arise in connection with measures designed to counteract the effect of such interruption. Students are introduced to the underlying rationale for crisis management and business continuity initiatives both from a theoretical and professional perspective.

The module examines the positioning of crisis management within an organisation’s overall strategic plan by reference to examples of good practice from organisations at home and abroad. Students can examine the role and function of effective crisis communication during times of crisis. Approaches to crisis management are evaluated and applied to a range of organisational case studies. The module also explores the relationship between crisis management and risk management which is seen as an inherent part of all businesses and which is further compounded by the uncertainties with the nature of product and consumer.

Developing Brands Through Advertising (Option)

This is a two term module designed to look at branding, brand management and digital marketing and advertising. In the first term the module aims to equip students with the knowledge, skills and tools to successfully analyse, audit and manage a brand in today’s competitive marketplace environment. The second part of this module explores digital marketing and how it can be used to communicate and engage effectively with customers in the brand management process and is intended to develop students’ critical understanding of the challenges and opportunities that organisations face when ‘advertising’ their brands using digital marketing techniques.

Digital Economy and Digital Cultures (Option)

This module examines the dynamic relationship between technological change and the production and consumption of travel and event experiences. Specifically it focuses on trends and debates about digital technologies and what Ritzer (2010) labels ‘prosumption’; drawing on a practitioner and academic discourse. The starting point is a discussion of conceptual and theoretical debates associated with key authors, followed by a critical examination of the application of digital technologies in the fields of tourism and events.

Dissertation in Tourism and Sport Business Management (Option)

This double module occupies a central role in the final year of the tourism and sports business management degrees. It provides the principal vehicle by which students can clearly illustrate their ability to synthesise the differing disciplinary approaches and theoretical perspectives they have studied over three years. It aims to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competency as independent, reflective researchers.

Financial Management For Business 1 (Option)

This module is designed to enhance students learning from their level two studies and to take their appreciation of theoretical finance into the real world of business application. The module will look to teach financial skills and knowledge that will be invaluable to students in whichever career they subsequently pursue.

Financial Management For Business 2 (Option)

This module is designed to enhance students learning from Financial Management for Business 1 and to expand their thinking, application and challenge of a number of areas of corporate finance, aiming to give students a range of practical tools and understanding for their eventual roles within a plethora of different types of organisation.

Leadership and High Performance Teams (Option)

This module aims to offer students two significant moments of practical reflection. Firstly, the module provides students with the opportunity to reflect on some of the powerful images of leadership that influence their own views on leading, following and leadership. Secondly, the module asks for students to consider their own skills, qualities and capabilities in order to consider their near future and the question 'what sort of leader am I and what sort of leader might I become?'

Marketing Communications (Option)

The module places the development of marketing communications in the context of business and marketing strategies. Theories of information processing and buyer behaviour, both at individual and organisational level, are explored and applied in the development of communication plans. Particular emphasis is placed on the discussion of the elements of the communications mix, the media selection and the evaluation of the effectiveness and efficiency of communications.

Planning and Evaluating Event Legacy (Core)

Events are multidimensional in nature, involving a range of stakeholders. This complicates evaluation as the ‘success’ of the event is viewed differently by different groups of stakeholders. Events can be evaluated from the perspective of the ‘business’ and/or the customer, but increasingly events organisers have to be able to justify events in a wider economic, environmental, socio-cultural and political contexts.

This module is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop the tools required to undertake and present critical event evaluation.

Policies and Planning for Sport (Core)

This module is designed to examine the development of policy and planning for sport within a business environment. Students can examine the concept that a new business ideology is forming the basis for sport policy and planning in all sectors and linked further with the development of Sport strategy. The important role of national agencies in developing policy and plans is considered in some detail at local, regional, national and international levels. The linkage between the public sector’s social and economic objectives and those policies clearly identified with sport are subject to analysis and further discussion.

Strategic Management for Tourism and Events (Core)

This module draws upon and integrates a range of business disciplines in examining the theory and practice of strategic management within a changing tourism, sports and events business environment. As well as examining the local and national dimensions of business strategy, the module recognises the increasingly international context of contemporary business activity. In so doing, the module bridges the gap between discrete functionalist disciplines and the broader issues involved in general business activity. Learning focuses on encouraging critical evaluation of the nature of strategy, its roles in contemporary tourism, sports and events business and the practical difficulties in formulating and implementing business strategy appropriate to tourism, sports and events related operations and activities.

The Professional Practice Year (Option)

This module is aimed at those students who have decided to take a year out of formal studies to gain accredited work experience and are registered on a degree programme with an accredited professional practice element. The Professional Practice Year aims to give students a continuous experience of full-time work within an organisation; normally this should be paid work.

It should be a three way co-operative activity between employer, student and University from which all parties benefit. Students can choose to pursue a variety of options including a placement year, a consultancy project or a work-based dissertation. Potential costs relating to this module are outlined in the Features tab.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Placements

Work Placement Year (Professional Practice)

The opportunity to take a year-long work placement (Professional Practice) after the second year is open to all full-time students on this course. Students are supported academically throughout the application process and when they take up a position in a professional business environment. This can allow them to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. Students are responsible for any travel, accommodation and general living costs related to this placement. The University does not charge tuition fees for a work placement year.

There are also opportunities for relevant work experience and career development as part of the degree course itself, as well as through various other Lincoln International Business School and University schemes. For more information about this please visit:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/lbs/workplacements/

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

The BA (Hons) Advertising and Marketing degree at Lincoln offers the opportunity to develop the creativity, knowledge and skills to deliver successful global campaigns, in preparation for a career in the creative industries.
The BSc (Hons) Events Management degree at Lincoln aims to help aspiring events professionals to develop their creativity, organisational skills and practical problem-solving abilities while building a critical understanding of the theory behind successful events.
The BA (Hons) Public Relations degree at Lincoln provides opportunities for students to learn a strategic approach to PR and benefit from an integrated multi-media approach to communications. The course draws on the disciplines of storytelling, crisis management, events and campaigning.
This BA (Hons) Business Studies degree at Lincoln combines elements of accountancy, finance, marketing, management and economics, and offers students the opportunity to develop the critical-thinking, problem-solving and analytical skills needed to enter the competitive world of business.
This Business and Management degree is designed for students who want to work in the fast-paced global world of private and public organisations, coordinating teams and using resources efficiently, or establishing and running their own business.
This BA (Hons) Business and Marketing degree at Lincoln is designed to provide students with a firm grasp of the principles of business and marketing. Students are encouraged to explore the theoretical and practical context of business and develop a marketing specialism.
Lincoln’s BA (Hons) International Business Management course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid grounding in business process and mechanics, the skills to operate in a global environment and an in-depth understanding of the international marketplace.
The BA (Hons) International Tourism Management degree at Lincoln is designed to provide an insight into the contemporary global tourism industry, including its impact, interdependencies and importance to the economy. Tourism is one of the world’s fastest growing industries, it is worth billions to the global economy and can offer exciting career prospects.
The BA (Hons) Marketing Management degree offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of marketing techniques and the processes applicable to a wide range of business types and sectors. There is an international focus on developments in the industry, such as the emergence of new technologies and product and service innovation. The importance of digital marketing is acknowledged throughout the programme and students get the opportunity to develop digital skills from the first year.

Introduction

The BA (Hons) Sports Business Management degree at Lincoln is designed for students seeking to critically examine the sports sector using tools from the international world of business. It aims to enable you to explore the policy, planning, impact, management and delivery of sporting opportunities, particularly in a commercial context and develop your skills for the critical analysis of sport, sport products, services and operations.

According to Standard Life, the business of sport was worth £20billion to the UK economy, generating over 450,000 jobs in 2015. Globally, PwC estimated that the market for sports was valued at over US$145 billion. Whilst, ticket revenues, sponsorship, TV rights and merchandising constitute main segments in high profile sports and sports clubs, even third sector and grassroots sports organisations require management and organisational skill. The world of sport provides not only potentially lucrative opportunities but also a fascinating context within which to study sport and develop business acumen.

The course offers the opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in relation to the sports industry – its connection to the socio-cultural environment, global structure and complexity, and the challenges and issues involved in reconciling government objectives with personal and community aspirations. Lincoln International Business School aims to enable you to develop a strong business acumen, transferable skills and confidence to engage with practitioner experiences.

How You Study

Students have the opportunity to take options from their second year onwards which allows for the development of particular expertise from various areas of the School (finance, HR, marketing, advertising or PR). The opportunity to undertake an optional 12-month work placement (Professional Practice) between Years 2 and 3 can allow students to further develop their sport business/management knowledge and transferable skills within a real work environment, whilst significantly enhancing their employability on completion of the programme.

Contact Hours

Level 1:

At level one students will typically have around 13 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 1 hour of fieldwork
  • 2 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 3 hour in seminars
  • 7 hours in lectures


Level 2:

At level two students will typically have around 16 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 3 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 2 hours of project supervision
  • 1 hour of tutorial time
  • 3 hour in seminars
  • 7 hours in lectures


Level 3:

At level three students will typically have around 10 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 1 hour of external visits
  • 1 hours of project supervision
  • 1 hour of tutorial time
  • 3 hour in seminars
  • 4 hours in lectures


Overall Workload and Independent Study

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. Students’ overall workload will consist of their scheduled contact hours combined with independent study. The expected level of independent study is detailed below.

Level 1:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 312
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 26%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 74%

Level 2:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 317
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 26%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 74%

Level 3:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 199
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 17%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 83%

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

On each of our course pages you can find information on typical contact hours, modes of delivery and a breakdown of assessment methods. Where available, you will also be able to access a link to Unistats.com, where the latest data on student satisfaction and employability outcomes can be found.

How You Are Assessed

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

Assessment Breakdown

Level 1:

Coursework: 51.3%
Practical exams: 19.4%
Written exams: 29.4%

Level 2:

Coursework: 67.7%
Practical exams: 20.8%
Written exams: 11.5%

Level 3:

Coursework: 70%
Practical exams: 11.4%
Written exams: 18.6%

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln Business School Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: CCC

International Baccalaureate: 27 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Merit, Merit, Merit

Pass Access to Higher Education Diploma.

Applicants will also be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (or the equivalent), including English.

Applications are welcomed from mature students who are studying We will also consider applicants with extensive relevant work experience.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Foundations of Sports Management (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the business of sport. Students can develop an understanding of the contexts within which sport business managers need to operate, the technological changes and innovations which affect the way sport is experienced and managed. The globalisation of sport business is explained along with changing governance structures.

There is an ever increasing demand to deliver effective sports management at international, nation, regional and local levels. This requires systems with accountable delivery mechanisms. Sport no longer stands alone and there is an increasing need to work in partnerships with other stakeholders. These partnerships not only provide a complex network structuring the management of sport business but also pressure it to be sustainable, equitable and empowering. Sports Business Managers need to be aware not only of the different contexts within which sport is managed, but also how responsible management can be practised.

Introduction to Advertising (Core)

The more we understand about how people communicate, the better position we shall be in to manage our organisation’s messages. When quality and price are evenly matched within a sector, the advertising campaign might be the very thing that differentiates a product or brand from the competitor’s. This module encourages students to understand a range of core communication models and theories, in order for them to be able to analyse the likely impact of media messages on target audiences.

Introduction to Business Finance (Core)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to basic business finance for non-specialist students. The module explores the essential elements of business finance, which are required for a career in business, in any discipline.

Investigating the Experience Economy (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the tools of analysis required to research the supply of and demand for events within given geographical contexts. It provides students with the opportunity to explore ways to collect, manage, analyse and interpret data, in order to follow the research process from start to finish. Students can develop and employ information technology skills to map, graph and interrogate secondary data from published sources and primary data.

Organisational Behaviour (Core)

This module is intended for students who are interested in understanding the way people work, as individuals and as group members in firms. The module explores essential topics in a clear, concise and informative manner, aiming to introduce students to the interpersonal perceptual processes in a work environment; the key behavioural factors determining effective and ineffective groups; the usefulness of theories on leadership/management styles; and the difficulties in implementing change in organisations.

Principles of Marketing (Core)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of marketing. Students will have the chance to examine the key concepts and issues of marketing.

Sport Studies: Techniques and Applications (Core)

This module examines the ways of understanding and investigating sport in contemporary society. Students can develop the tools of analysis needed to investigate the world of sport. Through exploring how sport is structured and bounded by politics, power and societal change, students can develop an understanding about how the sports industry evolves. The market for sport is explored through the lens of institutional, psychological and societal drivers or barriers to sports participation. Issues of power, gender, race, disability and identity will be explored. Students will also be introduced to the sources and methods used in sports related research.

Level 2

Budgeting for Business (Option)

The module is designed to equip students with the understanding and skills to help them deal with the financial issues they will face in whatever business discipline they eventually practise. Issues include the use of budgeting as a motivational tool and the potential benefits of participation in the planning process.

Using variance analysis, we will consider how deviations from plan may be identified and explained, and how this may in turn be used to enhance future planning and performance.

Buyer Behaviour (Option)

This module is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to understand what buyer behaviour is, why it is important for marketers and organisations; and how to initiate customer research activities to explore the increasing complexity of customer behaviour. The focus will be primary on consumer behaviour, but in addition important attention will be paid to business and organisational buyer behaviour.

Commercial Sports Club Management (Core)

This module aims to develop knowledge of the structures, systems and operations of sports clubs, and examines methods and issues specific to the management of these clubs. It addresses issues of sports premises and facilities management, including environmental impacts and considerations. There is an examination of the major areas of club activity, including food and beverage provision, community interaction, and event/tournament management. The module also examines legal and financial considerations in the management of members and memberships, players, staff and visitors.

Corporate Reputation and Public Relations (Option)

This module aims to provide a critical understanding of corporate reputation and public relations (PR) with an emphasis on measuring and managing reputation in today’s increasingly connected word. We aim to provide students with the most up-to-date theories of corporate reputation following a hands-on approach where students are expected to apply their understanding of corporate reputation and PR to real-world case studies.

Cross Cultural Management (Option)

This module is designed for students who are thinking of a career in the international arena. It will be of use to anyone interested in working in multinationals or those interested in understanding how business is conducted across different cultures

Event Management (Option)

This module provides an insight into the strategic management of events of all sizes and types. The module provides a framework of the event planning process, using short and long-term strategies and an overview of operational strategies. Students are expected to organise an event of their own in this module and all that it entails. The event is assessed from conception through to operation and evaluation.

Finance for Business (Option)

The module is designed to equip students with understanding and skills to help them deal with the financial issues they will face in whatever business discipline they eventually practise. At its conclusion, students should have a solid understanding of the key elements of financial accounting and financial management that inform and affect the manager.

Human Resource Management For Tourism and Events (Core)

This module will examine the human side of management, and how this impacts on tourism and events related organisations: their staff, customers and other stakeholders. People are the primary focus for this module.

Media Planning for Advertising (Option)

This module aims to provide an insight into strategic media planning, emphasising critical thinking and applied analytical skills regarding strategic communication. The module will cover media research, evaluation, selection and planning as well as decision-making in the context of media planning. The module aims to develop the skills required for students interested in pursuing a career that requires media interaction.

Operations Management (Option)

This module is designed to introduce students to a wide range of Operations Management topics that contribute to an understanding of organisations as systems seeking to remain viable and competitive within their environment.

Principles of Project Management (Option)

This module aims to provide a solid foundation in the theory and best practice of project management, with the aim of developing the practical skills of how to plan, implement and control projects. The module provides students with the chance to develop an understanding of the system perspective on management and a practically oriented introduction to the nature and purpose of project management and its key functions (scope, time, cost, quality, risk).

Relational Strategies and Interactive Media (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding the various concepts associated with relationship marketing and direct marketing, and analysing how these impact on organisations in a marketing context. The module then provides the chance for students to develop an understanding of the role of interactive and traditional media for developing and maintaining relationships with customers.

Research Methods for Tourism and Events (Core)

This module provides students with an opportunity to develop a range of research skills, both quantitative and qualitative. In so doing it aims to prepares students for their final year dissertation by giving them the chance to develop skills, ideas and confidence to undertake a major piece of primary research. The module also encourages students to evaluate research using the key concepts of reliability and validity.

Sponsorship and Corporate Hospitality (Core)

This module introduces the differing models of sponsorship and how these can be adapted to suit a variety of corporate settings. Students will be expected to take full advantage of module visits and incorporate these experiences into academic research and writing. Corporation visits will be amalgamated with lectures and seminars relating to endorsements, ambush marketing and the relationship between sponsorship and corporate hospitality.

Sport, Society and Cultural Values (Core)

This module explores the ways in which contemporary sport is reflective of cultural values that are identifiable in wider society. A central component will be an examination of the way sport is presented in the present day media.

Sports Law (Core)

This module introduces students to the structure and legal frameworks within which sports and the sporting community is permitted to operate. The module presents students with a practical exposure to ‘applied law’. It shows how various branches of law such as contract, negligence, intellectual property and crime are applied in a sporting context. The module also explores various branches of the law operating within the sports arena.

Students are required to examine a range of public and social policy issues relating to the regulation, integrity and commercial nature of sports and identify instances of discrimination, inequality and breach of civil liberties in the sporting context. Students are also invited to explore some of the ethical issues which may arise in connection with the regulation and governance of sporting activities.

Tourism Enterprise Project (Option)

The basis of this module is that students work in groups of four to undertake a ‘live’ project, with a particular critical focus, for a tourism employer as client. Students are encouraged to think of themselves as graduate trainees, who under the direction of their tutor as project director, undertake research, evaluate and synthesise the information acquired, and present it to their client with recommendations.

Level 3

Consultancy Project (Business) (Option)

The Consultancy Project module provides the opportunity for students to work as Marketing/PR/Advertising consultants on a ‘live’ company project. The overriding goal is for students to experience real company problems first hand and to work in small groups to attempt to find information and ideas that offer meaningful solutions to the client company.

Students will have the chance to apply knowledge gained from the degree programme in a real world environment.

Consumer Culture (Option)

This module offers students the opportunity to examine the role of cultural change in shaping patterns of contemporary consumption. Students can undertake an analysis of contemporary culture, through which the emergence of present-day patterns of tourism and events consumption can be understood and explained.

Crisis Management (Option)

This module addresses the implications of interruption to business and the issues and problems that may arise in connection with measures designed to counteract the effect of such interruption. Students are introduced to the underlying rationale for crisis management and business continuity initiatives both from a theoretical and professional perspective. The module examines the positioning of crisis management within an organisation’s overall strategic plan by reference to examples of good practice from organisations at home and abroad.

Students can examine the role and function of effective crisis communication during times of crisis. Approaches to crisis management are evaluated and applied to a range of organisational case studies. The module also explores the relationship between crisis management and risk management which is seen as an inherent part of all businesses and which is further compounded by the uncertainties with the nature of product and consumer.

Developing Brands Through Advertising (Option)

This is a two term module designed to look at branding, brand management and digital marketing and advertising. In the first term the module aims to equip students with the knowledge, skills and tools to successfully analyse, audit and manage a brand in today’s competitive marketplace environment. The second part of this module explores digital marketing and how it can be used to communicate and engage effectively with customers in the brand management process and is intended to develop students’ critical understanding of the challenges and opportunities that organisations face when ‘advertising’ their brands using digital marketing techniques.

Digital Economy and Digital Cultures (Option)

This module examines the dynamic relationship between technological change and the production and consumption of travel and event experiences. Specifically it focuses on trends and debates about digital technologies and what Ritzer (2010) labels ‘prosumption’; drawing on a practitioner and academic discourse. The starting point is a discussion of conceptual and theoretical debates associated with key authors, followed by a critical examination of the application of digital technologies in the fields of tourism and events.

Dissertation in Tourism and Sport Business Management (Option)

This double module occupies a central role in the final year of the tourism and sports business management degrees. It provides the principal vehicle by which students can clearly illustrate their ability to synthesise the differing disciplinary approaches and theoretical perspectives they have studied over three years. It aims to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their competency as independent, reflective researchers.

Financial Management For Business 1 (Option)

This module is designed to enhance students learning from their level two studies and to take their appreciation of theoretical finance into the real world of business application. The module will aim to teach the financial skills and knowledge that will be invaluable to students whichever career they subsequently pursue.

Financial Management For Business 2 (Option)

This module is designed to enhance students' learning from Financial Management for Business 1 and to expand their thinking, application and challenge of a number of areas of corporate finance, aiming to give students a range of practical tools and understanding for their eventual roles within a plethora of different types of organisation.

Leadership and High Performance Teams (Option)

This module aims to offer students two significant moments of practical reflection. Firstly, the module provides students with the opportunity to reflect on some of the powerful images of leadership that influence their own views on leading, following and leadership. Secondly, the module asks for students to consider their own skills, qualities and capabilities in order to consider their near future and the question 'what sort of leader am I and what sort of leader might I become?'

Marketing Communications (Option)

The module places the development of marketing communications in the context of business and marketing strategies. Theories of information processing and buyer behaviour, both at individual and organisational level, are explored and applied in the development of communication plans. Particular emphasis is placed on the discussion of the elements of the communications mix, the media selection and the evaluation of the effectiveness and efficiency of communications.

Planning and Evaluating Event Legacy (Core)

Events are multidimensional in nature, involving a range of stakeholders. This complicates evaluation as the ‘success’ of the event is viewed differently by different groups of stakeholders. Events can be evaluated from the perspective of the ‘business’ and/or the customer, but increasingly events organisers have to be able to justify events in a wider economic, environmental, socio-cultural and political contexts.

This module is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop the tools required to undertake and present critical event evaluation.

Policies and Planning for Sport (Core)

This module is designed to examine the development of policy and planning for sport within a business environment. Students can examine the concept that a new business ideology is forming the basis for sport policy and planning in all sectors and linked further with the development of Sport strategy. The important role of national agencies in developing policy and plans is considered in some detail at local, regional, national and international levels. The linkage between the public sector’s social and economic objectives and those policies clearly identified with sport are subject to analysis and further discussion.

Strategic Management for Tourism and Events (Core)

This module draws upon and integrates a range of business disciplines in examining the theory and practice of strategic management within a changing tourism, sports and events business environment. As well as examining the local and national dimensions of business strategy, the module recognises the increasingly international context of contemporary business activity. In so doing, the module looks to bridge the gap between discrete functionalist disciplines and the broader issues involved in general business activity. Learning focuses on encouraging critical evaluation of the nature of strategy, its roles in contemporary tourism, sports and events business and the practical difficulties in formulating and implementing business strategy appropriate to tourism, sports and events related operations and activities.

The Professional Practice Year (Option)

This module is aimed at those students who have decided to take a year out of formal studies to gain accredited work experience and are registered on a degree programme with an accredited professional practice element. The Professional Practice Year aims to give students a continuous experience of full-time work within an organisation.

It should be a three way co-operative activity between employer, student and University from which all parties benefit. Students can choose to pursue a variety of options including a placement year, a consultancy project or a work-based dissertation. Potential costs relating to this module are outlined in the Features tab.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Placements

Work Placement Year (Professional Practice)

The opportunity to take a year-long work placement (Professional Practice) after the second year is open to all full-time students on this course. Students are supported academically throughout the application process and when they take up a position in a professional business environment. This can allow them to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. Students are responsible for any travel, accommodation and general living costs related to this placement. The University does not charge tuition fees for a work placement year.

There are also opportunities for relevant work experience and career development as part of the degree course itself, as well as through various other Lincoln International Business School and University schemes. For more information about this please visit:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/lbs/workplacements/

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

The BA (Hons) Advertising and Marketing degree at Lincoln offers the opportunity to develop the creativity, knowledge and skills to deliver successful global campaigns, in preparation for a career in the creative industries.
The BSc (Hons) Events Management degree at Lincoln aims to help aspiring events professionals to develop their creativity, organisational skills and practical problem-solving abilities while building a critical understanding of the theory behind successful events.
The BA (Hons) Public Relations degree at Lincoln provides opportunities for students to learn a strategic approach to PR and benefit from an integrated multi-media approach to communications. The course draws on the disciplines of storytelling, crisis management, events and campaigning.
This BA (Hons) Business Studies degree at Lincoln combines elements of accountancy, finance, marketing, management and economics, and offers students the opportunity to develop the critical-thinking, problem-solving and analytical skills needed to enter the competitive world of business.
This Business and Management degree is designed for students who want to work in the fast-paced global world of private and public organisations, coordinating teams and using resources efficiently, or establishing and running their own business.
This BA (Hons) Business and Marketing degree at Lincoln is designed to provide students with a firm grasp of the principles of business and marketing. Students are encouraged to explore the theoretical and practical context of business and develop a marketing specialism.
Lincoln’s BA (Hons) International Business Management course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid grounding in business process and mechanics, the skills to operate in a global environment and an in-depth understanding of the international marketplace.
The BA (Hons) International Tourism Management degree at Lincoln is designed to provide an insight into the contemporary global tourism industry, including its impact, interdependencies and importance to the economy. Tourism is one of the world’s fastest growing industries, it is worth billions to the global economy and can offer exciting career prospects.
The BA (Hons) Marketing Management degree offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of marketing techniques and the processes applicable to a wide range of business types and sectors. There is an international focus on developments in the industry, such as the emergence of new technologies and product and service innovation. The importance of digital marketing is acknowledged throughout the programme and students get the opportunity to develop digital skills from the first year.

Tuition Fees

2017/18 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level
£12,800 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2018/19 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level
£13,800 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

In 2017/18, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

In 2018/19, fees may increase in line with Government Policy. We will update this information when fees for 2018/19 are finalised.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Testimonials

Student Placement Testimonials


Students on this course have the opportunity to undertake an optional 12-month work placement (Professional Practice) between Years 2 and 3. This can allow students to further develop their sports business management knowledge and transferable skills within a real work environment, whilst significantly enhancing their employability upon completion of the programme.

 


Charlotte Jude, BA (Hons) Sports Business Management, 2015


"I undertook my placement with O2, Telefonica as an Operations Intern, from which I progressed to an Operational Excellence Analyst during my time with O2. The work experience proved extremely valuable and as result it enabled me to secure a job on their graduate programme before returning to my final year.

"I was privileged enough to have lunch with the CEO and get an opportunity to ask questions about the challenges he was facing at the time.

"I would highly recommend the BA (Hons) Sports Management degree and the year in industry. The course taught a wide range of modules covering many different aspects of business from communications and finance to events management, all of which I’ve been able to apply to my roles within O2 during my time as intern and after as a graduate. I am currently working on a graduate programme back in O2 Telefonica in London."


Stephanie Henderson, BA (Hons) Sports Business Management, 2015


"I was excited to have secured a placement with Decathlon UK, Head Office as part of my work placement year. I was taken on in the capacity of E-commerce Marketing Placement; the role involved a lot of e-commerce support and customer service work.

"During my placement I learned that once I had left university employers definitely looked on the experience favourably when attending interviews. I was able to conduct myself in a manner that made me feel comfortable in a professional environment, which was an advantage over other people leaving university.

"My standout moment of the placement year was my involvement in the opening of the first Decathlon UK warehouse, a key project from which I gained valuable experience.

"I would advise students to not just take the first thing they are offered, try to be as sure as you can that you are going somewhere that has your best interests in mind and they want to help you develop. Understand what your average day-to day-routine will look like and be sure that it is something that you want to do.

"I now work for Firstaid4sport, a national company based in Lincoln, taking care of the marketing, PR and communications including social media and sponsorship deals."


Jack Watson, BA (Hons) Sports Business Management, 2015


"My placement year was with Benchmark Communications where my role was that of Events Assistant. I helped to organise and host corporate events as well as selling event tickets.

"I gained insight into an industry in which I was very interested in; learning about the kind of full-time work one can expect after leaving university. I also got involved in some of the biggest corporate events in the North East, some of which played host to over 1000 delegates from 50 countries.

"The moment that stood out for me was when I was selling tickets for the Disney Customer Service Training Workshop as part of a team of four, I was solely responsible for over 70% of the ticket sales, without which the event couldn’t have taken place. I also enjoyed working on the North East Accountancy Awards and the IEC Animal Behaviour Conference.

"I would advise students to absolutely go for it! Have a good look at what jobs are available, however if you’re not finding what you want in your chosen industry, be proactive and contact employers speculatively. Benchmark Communications weren’t advertising for anyone but I found out they had done something similar in the past.

"I am currently working at Echo Events in Newcastle, and I’m certain that the placement year was the difference between me and other candidates for the job."

 

 

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions].