Course Information
Select year of entry:
3-4 years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (or equivalent qualifications) NN1M 4 years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points) (or equivalent qualifications) NN1M

91% of students on BA (Hons) Business and Marketing stated they are satisfied overall with their course according to the National Student Survey 2017.

Introduction

This BA (Hons) Business and Marketing degree at Lincoln is designed to provide students with a firm grasp of the principles of business and marketing. Students are encouraged to explore the theoretical and practical context of business and develop a marketing specialism.

Rapid technological advancements are levelling the playing field with regards to marketing, a sector that now recognises innovation and creativity as elements that are just as important as, if not more so than, a large marketing budget.

Throughout this degree, students have the opportunity to become familiar with the international business environment, identify marketing opportunities and develop an understanding of how to overcome the challenges of reaching mass and niche audiences. Modules are designed to enable students to gain the tools needed to develop successful strategies and business campaigns.

Accreditations

This programme is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) and upon successful completion students are awarded 'advanced standing'. This will enable students to study for CIM qualifications without needing to complete all of the modules. Students will only need to complete two assessments instead of the usual three. Students can also add an individual award to supplement their degree.

Further details can be found on the CIM website: http://www.cim.co.uk/qualifications/graduate-gateway/

How You Study

This degree aims to introduce core business concepts and builds on this foundation throughout the course. In the final year, students may choose from a wide variety of business modules to reflect individual interests. Lectures are designed to give an overview of current issues and debates within the discipline. Some are delivered by visiting practitioners who provide 'live' case material and offer students access to industry contacts and careers advice.

In addition, there is the opportunity to take a year-long work placement (Professional Practice) after the second year. A work placement can allow students to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. Students may complete a placement year, a consultancy project or a work-based dissertation.

More details regarding the potential costs associated with these placements are outlined in the Features tab.

Direct Entry Students

For students starting this programme in 2016 via direct entry onto either years 2 or 3, modules will differ to those showing within the modules tab. Please contact the programme leader for further details.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Are Assessed

Students are expected to move in a continuous process from a dependent learning state to one of independence. At the end of the degree course, it is expected that students will be much more autonomous and reflexive individuals equipped with a set of skills which can enable them to operate successfully in society and the world of work.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

What We Look For In Your Application

An interest and curiosity about the world of business and marketing.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln Business School Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required.

In addition, applicants must have a minimum of five GCSEs (or the equivalent) at grade C or above, including English and Maths.

We encourage applications from mature students and we will give special individual consideration to those that are in this category and do not have the standard entry requirements.

Degree preparation courses for international students:

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Analysis of Business Data (Core)

This module aims to introduce some quantitative techniques fundamental to the analysis of business data. It seeks to promote a critical awareness and understanding of some of the processes, techniques and technology by which numerical information can be collected and communicated. Students have the opportunity to practice the systematic use of appropriate industry-standard computer technology for the acquisition, analysis and presentation of data (for example, Excel or SPSS).

Introduction to Advertising (Core)

This module examines the theories of advertising and introduces the students to the various conceptual frameworks which attempt to explain how advertising works. It provides an introduction to the different media. Emphasis is placed on the advertising agency, its relationship with their clients and the media selection and buying process. Issues such as how the advertising industry manages and regulates good practice are explored.

Introduction to Business Finance (Core)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to basic business finance for non-specialist students. The module explores the essential elements of business finance, which are required for a career in business, in any discipline.

Organisational Behaviour (Core)

This module is intended for students who are interested in understanding the way people work, as individuals and as group members in firms. The module explores essential topics in a clear, concise and informative manner, aiming to introduce students to the interpersonal perceptual processes in a work environment; the key behavioural factors determining effective and ineffective groups; the usefulness of theories on leadership/management styles; and the difficulties in implementing change in organisations.

Principles of Marketing (Core)

This module of the programme is designed for students who have little or no marketing knowledge. The aim is to familiarise students with the key concepts and issues of marketing, giving them a thorough grasp of the sort of marketing decisions there are to be made and what factors affect them.

Principles of Microeconomics (Core)

This module explores a range of economic concepts and basic analytical techniques. The focus of the module is the Financial Times (FT). The FT covers issues relating to operations management, accounting, HRM, economics, finance etc., all of which are relevant to a business degree. Students are encouraged to keep abreast of current events in the commercial environment, which can help when competing for placements and employment opportunities in the commercial world.

Social and Sustainability Marketing (Core)

This module aims to present an overview of current sustainability issues within society. It will provide students with the chance to develop an understanding of some of the criticisms of marketing, considering the role of marketing in contributing towards these issues. Ultimately it aims to encourage students to develop a sense of responsibility within their own practice.

The Marketing Professional (Core)

The focus of this module is to challenge students to understand the work of marketing professionals, to think critically, develop their practical skills, and start preparing themselves for (possible) work placements and graduate careers in the field of marketing.

Level 2

Budgeting for Business (Core)

The module is designed to equip students with the understanding and skills to help them deal with the financial issues they will face in whatever business discipline they eventually practise. Issues include the use of budgeting as a motivational tool and the potential benefits of participation in the planning process.

Using variance analysis, we will consider how deviations from plan may be identified and explained, and how this may in turn be used to enhance future planning and performance.

Buyer Behaviour (Core)

This module is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to understand what buyer behaviour is, why it is important for marketers and organisations; and how to initiate customer research activities to explore the increasing complexity of customer behaviour. The focus will be primary on consumer behaviour, but in addition important attention will be paid to business and organisational buyer behaviour.

Careers and Employability (Core)

This module is designed to enable students to identify potential career paths, understand power, emotional intelligence and responsibility in a professional context. Moreover, the module aims to enhance the students' understanding of the graduate job market and the skills they need for meeting employer requirements and securing a job. Students are expected to map their skills and competences as part of their assessment, based on the analysis of job descriptions and practise interview and presentation skills. In addition to lectures and seminars, students will have the chance to learn from industry guest speakers who will share their personal career journeys and will aim to provide advice on specific graduate job opportunities.

Corporate Reputation and Public Relations (Core)

This module aims to provide a critical understanding of corporate reputation and public relations (PR) with an emphasis on measuring and managing reputation in today’s increasingly connected word. We aim to provide students with the most up-to-date theories of corporate reputation following a hands-on approach where students are expected to apply their understanding of corporate reputation and PR to real-world case studies.

Finance for Business (Option)

The module is designed to equip students with understanding and skills to help them deal with the financial issues they will face in whatever business discipline they eventually practise. At its conclusion, students should have a solid understanding of the key elements of financial accounting and financial management that inform and affect the manager.

Media Planning for Advertising (Option)

This module aims to provide an insight into strategic media planning, emphasising critical thinking and applied analytical skills regarding strategic communication. The module will cover media research, evaluation, selection and planning as well as decision-making in the context of media planning. The module aims to develop the skills required for students interested in pursuing a career that requires media interaction.

Principles of Project Management (Option)

This module aims to provide a solid foundation in the theory and best practice of project management, with the aim of developing the practical skills of how to plan, implement and control projects. The module provides students with the chance to develop an understanding of the system perspective on management and a practically oriented introduction to the nature and purpose of project management and its key functions (scope, time, cost, quality, risk).

Professional Practice (Option)

This module is aimed at those students who have decided to take a year out of formal studies to gain accredited work experience and are registered on a degree programme with an accredited professional practice element. The Professional Practice Year aims to give students a continuous experience of full-time work within an organisation.

It should be a three way co-operative activity between employer, student and University from which all parties benefit. Students can choose to pursue a variety of options including a placement year, a consultancy project or a work-based dissertation. Potential costs relating to this module are outlined in the Features tab.

Research and Consultancy Methods (Core)

This module explores various qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis. Students will have the chance to learn how to conduct, transcribe and analyse semi-structured and open-ended interviews and other forms of text. The principles and procedures of survey design and statistical modelling will also be discussed; students are expected to use appropriate computer-based statistical software, such as Stata, Eviews and SPSS, to analyse data.

Strategic Marketing Planning (Core)

This module considers how changing macro and micro environmental influences impact and are incorporated into the marketing planning process. The module blends a theoretical and applied approach, requiring students to use relevant models and frameworks both in the analysis of case material and when developing a sustainable product concept.

Level 3

Consultancy Project (Business) (Option)

The Consultancy Project module provides the opportunity for students to work as Marketing/PR/Advertising consultants on a ‘live’ company project. The overriding goal is for students to experience real company problems first hand and to work in small groups to attempt to find information and ideas that offer meaningful solutions to the client company.

Students will have the chance to apply knowledge gained from the degree programme in a real world environment.

Digital Business and E-Commerce (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an overview of e-business by reviewing how firms run their businesses, organise operational infrastructures, share information with business partners and communicate with customers. It explores the role of e-commerce (that is, the trading of goods and services through online systems such as e-sales and e-purchases) on market position, competition and sustainability, and encourages student to reflect on the changing nature of the relationship between the supplier and user/the human and the digital interface.

Dissertation (Business) (Option)

The dissertation is a major independent piece of work intended to develop a student’s ability to actively engage with core disciplinary issues. The dissertation focuses on analysis, synthesis and critique. In undertaking dissertation research, students are required to demonstrate the ability to identify, organise and select from a large body of material in order to produce a coherent, well-defined and internally consistent representation of their findings.

Entrepreneurial Marketing (Option)

This module has been designed to give students the opportunity to develop an ability to quickly assess the nature of business enterprise. Students are encouraged to learn and understand the challenges, opportunities and skills required by organisations to make effective decisions in a rapidly changing business environment.

The module aims to develop the entrepreneurial marketing skills and knowledge that may enhance a student’s employability, and assist them in contributing to company activities and profitability. The overriding goal of the module is to aid students in understanding practically ‘how businesses grow’ and ‘how’ they as future employees can make positive contribution to this growth.

Financial Management For Business 1 (Option)

This module is designed to enhance students learning from their level two studies and to take their appreciation of theoretical finance into the real world of business application. The module will look to teach financial skills and knowledge that will be invaluable to students in whichever career they subsequently pursue.

Financial Management For Business 2 (Option)

This module is designed to enhance students learning from Financial Management for Business 1 and to expand their thinking, application and challenge of a number of areas of corporate finance, aiming to give students a range of practical tools and understanding for their eventual roles within a plethora of different types of organisation.

Global Marketing Strategy (Core)

This module aims to consider the strategic and tactical marketing implications for companies operating in a rapidly changing and dynamic global business environment. The module gives students the opportunity to develop a range of skills which may enable them to think strategically and tactically in the context of this globalised business world.

This module aims to provide you with the opportunity to develop an adequate understanding of the issues characterising international markets, such as the impact that macro and micro-environments have in international operations.

Leadership and High Performance Teams (Core)

This module aims to offer students two significant moments of practical reflection. Firstly, the module provides students with the opportunity to reflect on some of the powerful images of leadership that influence their own views on leading, following and leadership. Secondly, the module asks for students to consider their own skills, qualities and capabilities in order to consider their near future and the question 'what sort of leader am I and what sort of leader might I become?'

Marketing Communications (Core)

The module places the development of marketing communications in the context of business and marketing strategies. Theories of information processing and buyer behaviour, both at individual and organisational level, are explored and applied in the development of communication plans. Particular emphasis is placed on the discussion of the elements of the communications mix, the media selection and the evaluation of the effectiveness and efficiency of communications.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Entrepreneurship

The University of Lincoln is proud of its approach to nurturing entrepreneurship in its students. Lectures and visiting practitioners provide insight into current practice and global issues, while real-world projects help challenge students to develop problem solving skills.

Placements

Students have the opportunity to take a year-long work placement (Professional Practice) after the second year. A work placement can allow students to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. Students may complete a placement year, a consultancy project or a work-based dissertation.

Please note that students who choose to undertake a work placement do not pay tuition fees for that year, but are required to cover their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

There are also opportunities for relevant work experience and career development as part of the degree course itself, as well as through various other Lincoln International Business School and University schemes. For more information about this please visit:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/lbs/workplacements/

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

The Lincoln Business School is based in the David Chiddick building alongside Lincoln Law School. The building provides students with teaching and learning space including lecture theatres, workshop rooms, an IT/language lab and a mooting chamber, along with places to meet and eat with friends and staff.

Sage 50 and SPSS software is available within the Business School for students to use.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

This course aims to produce well-rounded business graduates with a marketing specialism. Recent graduates have gone on to work in communications, market research, e-commerce, project management, account management, creative marketing in the public sector or within in-house or agency marketing roles. Some graduates go on to start their own business, supported by the University's business incubation centre, Sparkhouse.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

The BA (Hons) Advertising and Marketing degree at Lincoln offers the opportunity to develop the creativity, knowledge and skills to deliver successful global campaigns, in preparation for a career in the creative industries.
The BA (Hons) Business and Enterprise Development degree at Lincoln is designed for students wanting to learn about business management and theory, while building up their own businesses in a supportive and professional environment.
Lincoln’s BA (Hons) International Business Management course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid grounding in business process and mechanics, the skills to operate in a global environment and an in-depth understanding of the international marketplace.
The BA (Hons) Marketing Management degree offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of marketing techniques and the processes applicable to a wide range of business types and sectors. There is an international focus on developments in the industry, such as the emergence of new technologies and product and service innovation. The importance of digital marketing is acknowledged throughout the programme and students get the opportunity to develop digital skills from the first year.

Introduction

This BA (Hons) Business and Marketing degree at Lincoln is designed to provide students with a firm grasp of the principles of business and marketing. Students are encouraged to explore the theoretical and practical context of business and develop a marketing specialism.

Rapid technological advancements are levelling the playing field with regards to marketing, a sector that now recognises innovation and creativity as elements that are just as important as, if not more so than, a large marketing budget.

Throughout this degree, students have the opportunity to become familiar with the international business environment, identify marketing opportunities and develop an understanding of how to overcome the challenges of reaching mass and niche audiences. Modules are designed to enable students to gain the tools needed to develop successful strategies and business campaigns.

The importance of digital marketing is acknowledged throughout the programme and students have the opportunity to develop digital skills from the first year.

Accreditations

This programme is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) and upon successful completion students are awarded 'advanced standing'. This will enable students to study for CIM qualifications without needing to complete all of the modules. Students will only need to complete two assessments instead of the usual three. Students can also add an individual award to supplement their degree.

Further details can be found on the CIM website: http://www.cim.co.uk/qualifications/graduate-gateway/

How You Study

This degree aims to introduce core business concepts and builds on this foundation throughout the course. In the final year, students may choose from a wide variety of business modules to reflect individual interests. Lectures are designed to give an overview of current issues and debates within the discipline. Some are delivered by visiting practitioners who provide 'live' case material and offer students access to industry contacts and careers advice.

The additional year offers the opportunity for students to complete a period of work experience after their second year of study, in order to apply their knowledge in a real business setting. Those who choose to undertake a Professional Practice year are not required to pay tuition fees for that year, but will be required to pay their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

Those students who are unable to undertake or choose not to participate in the Professional Practice year scheme, may have the option to undertake a work-related project such as a piece of consultancy or an enterprise project.

Contact Hours

Level 1:

At level one students will typically have around 13 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 4 hours in seminars
  • 9 hours in lectures


Level 2:

At level two students will typically have around 12 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 4 hours in seminars
  • 8 hours in lectures


Level 3:

At level three students will typically have around 8 hours of contact time per week. A typical week may consist of:

  • 2 hours of tutorial time
  • 3 hours in seminars
  • 3 hours in lectures


Overall Workload and Independent Study

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. Students’ overall workload will consist of their scheduled contact hours combined with independent study. The expected level of independent study is detailed below.

Level 1:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 305
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 25%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 75%


Level 2:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 295
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 25%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 75%


Level 3:

  • Total scheduled teaching and learning hours: 164.6
  • Percentage scheduled teaching and learning hours: 14%
  • Percentage of independent study expected: 86%

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Are Assessed

Students are expected to move in a continuous process from a dependent learning state to one of independence. At the end of the degree course, it is expected that students will be much more autonomous and reflexive individuals equipped with a set of skills which can enable them to operate successfully in society and the world of work.

Assessment Breakdown

Level 1:

Coursework: 48%
Practical exams: 18.1%
Written exams: 33.9%

Level 2:

Coursework: 60.83%
Practical exams: 5.83%
Written exams: 33.33%

Level 3:

Coursework: 55.3%
Practical exams: 20.3%
Written exams: 24.4%

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln Business School Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 to include 30 credits at merit or above.

In addition, applicants must have a minimum of three GCSEs (or the equivalent) at grade C or above, including English and Maths.

We encourage applications from mature students and we will give special individual consideration to those that are in this category and do not have the standard entry requirements.

Degree preparation courses for international students:

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Analysis of Business Data (Core)

This module aims to introduce some quantitative techniques fundamental to the analysis of business data. It seeks to promote a critical awareness and understanding of some of the processes, techniques and technology by which numerical information can be collected and communicated. Students have the opportunity to practice the systematic use of appropriate industry-standard computer technology for the acquisition, analysis and presentation of data (for example, Excel or SPSS).

Introduction to Advertising (Core)

The more we understand about how people communicate, the better position we shall be in to manage our organisation’s messages. When quality and price are evenly matched within a sector, the advertising campaign might be the very thing that differentiates a product or brand from the competitor’s. This module encourages students to understand a range of core communication models and theories, in order for them to be able to analyse the likely impact of media messages on target audiences.

Introduction to Business Finance (Core)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to basic business finance for non-specialist students. The module explores the essential elements of business finance, which are required for a career in business, in any discipline.

Organisational Behaviour (Core)

This module is intended for students who are interested in understanding the way people work, as individuals and as group members in firms. The module explores essential topics in a clear, concise and informative manner, aiming to introduce students to the interpersonal perceptual processes in a work environment; the key behavioural factors determining effective and ineffective groups; the usefulness of theories on leadership/management styles; and the difficulties in implementing change in organisations.

Principles of Marketing (Core)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of marketing. Students will have the chance to examine the key concepts and issues of marketing.

Principles of Microeconomics (Core)

This module explores a range of economic concepts and basic analytical techniques. The focus of the module is the Financial Times (FT). The FT covers issues relating to operations management, accounting, HRM, economics, finance etc., all of which are relevant to a business degree. Students are encouraged to keep abreast of current events in the commercial environment, which can help when competing for placements and employment opportunities in the commercial world.

Social and Sustainability Marketing (Core)

This module aims to present an overview of current sustainability issues within society. It will provide students with the chance to develop an understanding of some of the criticisms of marketing, considering the role of marketing in contributing towards these issues. Ultimately it aims to encourage students to develop a sense of responsibility within their own practice.

The Marketing Professional (Core)

The focus of this module is to challenge students to understand the work of marketing professionals, to think critically, develop their practical skills, and start preparing themselves for (possible) work placements and graduate careers in the field of marketing.

Level 2

Budgeting for Business (Core)

The module is designed to equip students with the understanding and skills to help them deal with the financial issues they will face in whatever business discipline they eventually practise. Issues include the use of budgeting as a motivational tool and the potential benefits of participation in the planning process.

Using variance analysis, we will consider how deviations from plan may be identified and explained, and how this may in turn be used to enhance future planning and performance.

Buyer Behaviour (Core)

This module is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to understand what buyer behaviour is, why it is important for marketers and organisations; and how to initiate customer research activities to explore the increasing complexity of customer behaviour. The focus will be primary on consumer behaviour, but in addition important attention will be paid to business and organisational buyer behaviour.

Careers and Employability (Core)

This module is designed to enable students to identify potential career paths, understand power, emotional intelligence and responsibility in a professional context. Moreover, the module aims to enhance the students' understanding of the graduate job market and the skills they need for meeting employer requirements and securing a job. Students are expected to map their skills and competences as part of their assessment, based on the analysis of job descriptions and practise interview and presentation skills. In addition to lectures and seminars, students will have the chance to learn from industry guest speakers who will share their personal career journeys and will aim to provide advice on specific graduate job opportunities.

Corporate Reputation and Public Relations (Core)

This module aims to provide a critical understanding of corporate reputation and public relations (PR) with an emphasis on measuring and managing reputation in today’s increasingly connected word. We aim to provide students with the most up-to-date theories of corporate reputation following a hands-on approach where students are expected to apply their understanding of corporate reputation and PR to real-world case studies.

Finance for Business (Option)

The module is designed to equip students with understanding and skills to help them deal with the financial issues they will face in whatever business discipline they eventually practise. At its conclusion, students should have a solid understanding of the key elements of financial accounting and financial management that inform and affect the manager.

Media Planning for Advertising (Option)

This module aims to provide an insight into strategic media planning, emphasising critical thinking and applied analytical skills regarding strategic communication. The module will cover media research, evaluation, selection and planning as well as decision-making in the context of media planning. The module aims to develop the skills required for students interested in pursuing a career that requires media interaction.

Principles of Project Management (Option)

This module aims to provide a solid foundation in the theory and best practice of project management, with the aim of developing the practical skills of how to plan, implement and control projects. The module provides students with the chance to develop an understanding of the system perspective on management and a practically oriented introduction to the nature and purpose of project management and its key functions (scope, time, cost, quality, risk).

Professional Practice (Option)

This module is aimed at those students who have decided to take a year out of formal studies to gain accredited work experience and are registered on a degree programme with an accredited professional practice element. The Professional Practice Year aims to give students a continuous experience of full-time work within an organisation.

It should be a three way co-operative activity between employer, student and University from which all parties benefit. Students can choose to pursue a variety of options including a placement year, a consultancy project or a work-based dissertation. Potential costs relating to this module are outlined in the Features tab.

Research and Consultancy Methods (Core)

This module explores various qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis. Students will have the chance to learn how to conduct, transcribe and analyse semi-structured and open-ended interviews and other forms of text. The principles and procedures of survey design and statistical modelling will also be discussed; students are expected to use appropriate computer-based statistical software, such as Stata, Eviews and SPSS, to analyse data.

Strategic Marketing Planning (Core)

This module considers how changing macro and micro environmental influences impact and are incorporated into the marketing planning process. The module blends a theoretical and applied approach, requiring students to use relevant models and frameworks both in the analysis of case material and when developing a sustainable product concept.

Level 3

Consultancy Project (Business) (Option)

The Consultancy Project module provides the opportunity for students to work as Marketing/PR/Advertising consultants on a ‘live’ company project. The overriding goal is for students to experience real company problems first hand and to work in small groups to attempt to find information and ideas that offer meaningful solutions to the client company.

Students will have the chance to apply knowledge gained from the degree programme in a real world environment.

Digital Business and E-Commerce (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to develop an overview of e-business by reviewing how firms run their businesses, organise operational infrastructures, share information with business partners and communicate with customers. It explores the role of e-commerce (that is, the trading of goods and services through online systems such as e-sales and e-purchases) on market position, competition and sustainability, and encourages student to reflect on the changing nature of the relationship between the supplier and user/the human and the digital interface.

Entrepreneurial Marketing (Option)

This module has been designed to give students the opportunity to develop an ability to quickly assess the nature of business enterprise. Students are encouraged to learn and understand the challenges, opportunities and skills required by organisations to make effective decisions in a rapidly changing business environment.

The module aims to develop the entrepreneurial marketing skills and knowledge that may enhance a student’s employability, and assist them in contributing to company activities and profitability. The overriding goal of the module is to aid students in understanding practically ‘how businesses grow’ and ‘how’ they as future employees can make positive contribution to this growth.

Financial Management For Business 1 (Option)

This module is designed to enhance students learning from their level two studies and to take their appreciation of theoretical finance into the real world of business application. The module will aim to teach the financial skills and knowledge that will be invaluable to students whichever career they subsequently pursue.

Financial Management For Business 2 (Option)

This module is designed to enhance students' learning from Financial Management for Business 1 and to expand their thinking, application and challenge of a number of areas of corporate finance, aiming to give students a range of practical tools and understanding for their eventual roles within a plethora of different types of organisation.

Global Marketing Strategy (Core)

This module aims to consider the strategic and tactical marketing implications for companies operating in a rapidly changing and dynamic global business environment. The module gives students the opportunity to develop a range of skills which may enable them to think strategically and tactically in the context of this globalised business world.

This module aims to provide you with the opportunity to develop an adequate understanding of the issues characterising international markets, such as the impact that macro and micro-environments have in international operations.

Leadership and High Performance Teams (Core)

This module aims to offer students two significant moments of practical reflection. Firstly, the module provides students with the opportunity to reflect on some of the powerful images of leadership that influence their own views on leading, following and leadership. Secondly, the module asks for students to consider their own skills, qualities and capabilities in order to consider their near future and the question 'what sort of leader am I and what sort of leader might I become?'

Marketing Communications (Core)

The module places the development of marketing communications in the context of business and marketing strategies. Theories of information processing and buyer behaviour, both at individual and organisational level, are explored and applied in the development of communication plans. Particular emphasis is placed on the discussion of the elements of the communications mix, the media selection and the evaluation of the effectiveness and efficiency of communications.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Entrepreneurship

The University of Lincoln is proud of its approach to nurturing entrepreneurialism in its students. Lecturers and practitioners can provide insight into current practice and global issues, while real-world projects help challenge students to develop problem-solving skills.

Placements

The additional year offers the opportunity for students to complete a period of work experience after their second year of study, in order to apply their knowledge in a real business setting. Those who choose to undertake a Professional Practice year are not required to pay tuition fees for that year, but will be required to pay their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

Those students who are unable to undertake or choose not to participate in the Professional Practice year scheme, may have the option to undertake a work-related project such as a piece of consultancy or an enterprise project.

There are also opportunities for relevant work experience and career development as part of the degree course itself, as well as through various other Lincoln International Business School and University schemes. For more information about this please visit:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/lbs/workplacements/

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

The Lincoln Business School is based in the David Chiddick building alongside Lincoln Law School. The building provides students with teaching and learning space including lecture theatres, workshop rooms, an IT/language lab and a mooting chamber, along with places to meet and eat with friends and staff.

Sage 50 and SPSS software is available within the Business School for students to use.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

This course aims to produce well-rounded business graduates with a marketing specialism. Recent graduates have gone on to work in communications, market research, e-commerce, project management, account management and creative marketing in the public sector or within in-house or agency marketing roles. Some graduates go on to start their own business, supported by the University’s business incubation centre, Sparkhouse.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

The BA (Hons) Advertising and Marketing degree at Lincoln offers the opportunity to develop the creativity, knowledge and skills to deliver successful global campaigns, in preparation for a career in the creative industries.
The BA (Hons) Business and Enterprise Development degree at Lincoln is designed for students wanting to learn about business management and theory, while building up their own businesses in a supportive and professional environment.
Lincoln’s BA (Hons) International Business Management course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid grounding in business process and mechanics, the skills to operate in a global environment and an in-depth understanding of the international marketplace.
The BA (Hons) Marketing Management degree offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of marketing techniques and the processes applicable to a wide range of business types and sectors. There is an international focus on developments in the industry, such as the emergence of new technologies and product and service innovation. The importance of digital marketing is acknowledged throughout the programme and students get the opportunity to develop digital skills from the first year.

Tuition Fees

2017/18 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level
£12,800 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2018/19 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level
£13,800 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

In 2017/18, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

In 2018/19, fees may increase in line with Government Policy. We will update this information when fees for 2018/19 are finalised.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions].