BA (Hons) Journalism and Creative Writing

The University of Lincoln has been rated in the top 20 of UK universities for student experience according to the Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018.

The Course

Lincoln’s BA (Hons) Journalism and Creative Writing programme has been designed to enable students to combine writing short stories, screenplays and poetry with the professional writing required by journalists for magazines, newspapers and online publishers.

Working in our suite of industry-standard newsrooms, students can learn the core values of good journalism and how to apply them to the different media platforms available today. Creative Writing workshops offer students the opportunity to explore new techniques to develop their own voice and help them become compelling writers of the future.

This course offers students the opportunity to learn how to operate as a journalist, working with industry-standard facilities and with teaching from journalism professionals. Students can learn core journalistic skills including news-gathering, media law, ethics, interviewing and writing, alongside developing an understanding of the professional aspects of writing for magazines, papers and online organisations.

The Creative Writing element of the course is designed to enable students to explore different formats in poetry, prose and scriptwriting in genres such as children’s writing, crime and science fiction.

Modules may include Essential Journalism, Writing Poetry, Writing Narrative, Writing and Enterprise, Ethics and International Human Rights for Journalists (optional), Comparative Media History (optional), Journalism Independent Study (optional) and The Psychological Thriller and Crime Fiction (optional).

While the focus of this programme is on providing the professional skills students need to succeed as writers – whether in the publishing world or in journalism – it also explores some of the commercial and business aspects of working in these areas. Students can learn about the business of publishing and how newsrooms operate to connect with their readers. Working with agents, the pros and cons of new electronic publishing platforms, who the major players are in the book world, how to get your work onto stage, radio or the screen, all form elements of the programme.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Critical and Creative Practice (Core)
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Critical and Creative Practice (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to creative writing in terms of practice and reflection. It does this by firstly establishing good writing habits (emphasising routine and discipline) and by providing clearly structured creative writing exercises that draw on their reading (textual interventions). The module will establish points of contact between creative and critical writing.

Essential Journalism 1 (Core)
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Essential Journalism 1 (Core)

This module will be a blend of practice and theory and aims to create a progression through the key journalistic skills needed to tell stories on the most appropriate platform using traditional, digital and mobile media. This module aims to develop a rounded awareness of the media and to give students the skills and insight that equip them to develop further in levels two and three. The focus is on newsgathering and storytelling skills. The way design influences different media is also analysed.

Essential Law (Core)
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Essential Law (Core)

Journalism students are required to abide by the law, in terms of newsgathering and research methods, data collection and retention, use of communication networks, publishing and broadcasting material to audiences. This module aims to introduce students to the legal system, to the operation of the courts, and examines the impact of legislation and codes of practice on the work of journalists.

Introduction to Journalism Studies (Core)
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Introduction to Journalism Studies (Core)

Journalism is a key activity not simply in the communication of news and current affairs, but as a primary definer of social, political and psychological contexts in which we live and work as citizens in the twenty-first century. This module introduces students to key cultural, commercial and technological developments that have shaped the modern media, exploring those developments in terms of their history as well as the social impacts of modern mass communications.

Writing Narrative (Core)
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Writing Narrative (Core)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas involved in writing stories. The module examines the nature of story and drama, how to create a character, and it introduces the idea of the character in action as a fundamental ingredient in building a dramatic story. It explores different approaches to structuring stories and examines the different demands made on the story teller by the different forms of drama (theatre, film and TV).

Writing Poetry (Core)
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Writing Poetry (Core)

The module aims to develop skills in the close reading of poetry, to introduce critical debates, to develop a facility in the writing of various poetic forms and the use of poetic techniques. Students can read poetry by a range of contemporary poets such as Carol Ann Duffy, Paul Farley, Jackie Kay and Max Porter.

The close reading of poetry and its use of rhythm and rhyme as well as the innovative application of language, aims to enable students to develop their own skills in these areas and help them to craft their own poetry, paying close attention to the mechanics of poetic writing.

Writing Portfolio (Core)
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Writing Portfolio (Core)

This module gives students the freedom to work within whatever genres they choose and put together a portfolio of their own work. This might take the form of one long piece or of several shorter pieces. The notion of ‘work in progress’ that is developed through to completion will be the basis of this module. Students have the chance to employ the skills gained to undertake a more challenging and larger piece of creative work.

Teaching will be workshop-based and will take the form of detailed peer reviews of students’ work-in-progress, drawing on the skills and techniques that have been developed in earlier modules.

Essential Journalism 2 (Core)
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Essential Journalism 2 (Core)

This module aims to develop the basic skills studied in Journalism Skills at Level One. Students are expected to proactively gather news and feature stories employing the full range of research and interview techniques. Students will be encouraged to produce imaginative and original copy conforming to professional standards, with careful consideration of topic, angle, choice of interviewees, necessary attribution and corroboration of facts in a variety of writing styles suitable for a range of traditional, digital and mobile platforms.

Ethics and International Human Rights for Journalists (Option)
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Ethics and International Human Rights for Journalists (Option)

This module aims to highlight the importance of human rights issues to the practice of journalism and aims to develop students’ awareness of the range of ethical issues facing journalists.

Histories of Journalism (Option)
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Histories of Journalism (Option)

This module extends the study of the history of journalism into the twentieth century. It provides students with the opportunity to critically consider the historical background to some of the issues which feature in contemporary news agendas – for example students may have the opportunity to discuss the reporting of war; changes in the National Health Service; critique of ‘care in the community’ relating to mental health, the export of American culture and ‘Globalisation’; the impact of ethnicity on politics and culture particularly in terms of EU debates; etc. Appropriate emphasis will be placed upon the role of the press in recording these social and political developments.

Journalism and Society (Option)
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Journalism and Society (Option)

The role of the media as a 'mirror' of society means that journalists encounter cross-cultural issues in their newsgathering and news processing functions. This module aims to prepare students to write stories with cultural sensitivity, care and compassion.

Law, Ethics and Regulation (Core)
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Law, Ethics and Regulation (Core)

This module aims to build on legal and administrative knowledge gleaned in Essential Law at Level One. It examines how criminal and civil legislation affecting print, online and broadcast journalists has developed; identifies areas of conflict and uncertainty; and requires students to apply knowledge of legislation and case law to given scenarios, including responses to actions in the civil courts.

Non-Fiction Workshop (Option)
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Non-Fiction Workshop (Option)

This module will encourage students to use their creative and technical skills to write non-fiction, including travel writing, life writing (biography and memoir), articles, reviews and journals. Particular attention will be paid to balancing the need to convey factual information with the creative potential of narrative, language and form.

Poetry Workshop (Option)
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Poetry Workshop (Option)

The poetry workshop operates as a series of sessions in which students experiment with a variety of poetic forms with the aim of compiling a small collection of their own verse.

Students will engage with a number of different poets each week as a stimulus to their own poetic engagement, and will compose and perform their own work as part of a practice of critique.

Research methods (Core)
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Research methods (Core)

This module is designed to equip students with the understanding of research design and methods for undertaking research. The module gives students the opportunity to develop their observational, analytical and writing skills. It has vocational relevance in enabling students to select a relevant research topic for in-depth analysis and evaluation in their final year.

Script Workshop (Option)
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Script Workshop (Option)

This module introduces students to the craft of writing plays for the theatre and radio. Students can study, watch and listen to a number of short plays and develop their understanding of the relationship between script and performance. Attention will be given to the nuts and bolts of scriptwriting - dialogue, pace, setting, and story. These are key to all forms of creative writing and literary analysis, as well as to creating successful pieces of theatre and radio drama.

Writing and Enterprise (Core)
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Writing and Enterprise (Core)

The aim of this module is to give students an insight into careers in the writing industries. It aims to prepare and support them in the process of applying for employment, residencies, grants, internships and other work in the creative industries and also help to prepare them for the realities of life as a contemporary writer.

Writing Short Fiction (Option)
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Writing Short Fiction (Option)

Many writers begin with the short story. Through writing short stories they are able to experiment, learn the fundamentals of narrative composition, and have the satisfaction of completing something to a high standard in a relatively short period of time.

This module aims to introduce students to the work of a range of short story writers, whilst helping them to develop their skills in crafting short fiction. Students will be asked to study particular stories each week, but also expected to pursue their own interests in reading. The skills required for writing short stories are also key to working in other forms, so this module looks to help students to develop as writers, whatever their plans and ambitions may be.

Comparative Media History (Option)
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Comparative Media History (Option)

This module aims to enable students to appreciate trends and changes within the main media industries (press, radio, TV, cinema, music and the internet) on a comparative basis between countries and between platforms. The module offers an opportunity to understand how the media has reached the state it is now in, and what trends are likely to continue in the future.

Independent Study: Creative Writing (Option)
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Independent Study: Creative Writing (Option)

The dissertation provides students with the opportunity to write an extensive piece of work of 8000 words (or 20 pages/200 lines of poetry) together with a 2000-word critique. The choice of form, style, genre, etc. is up to students' individual preference.

Skills developed at level 2 can be further enhanced through the dissertation; these include the structuring of an extended piece from an initial idea, the drafting process, editing, and mastery of the particular genre in which they have chosen to work. This close engagement with literary production as a practical exercise can not only helps students develop an effective writing style but, by placing them in the position of the author, also aims to deepen their understanding of literature in general.

International Media Policies (Option)
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International Media Policies (Option)

This module examines broadcasting structures in the UK and in other countries. It aims to develop students’ critical understanding of models of national broadcasting and the implications for media policy and mass media's role in society. The module aims to introduce students to the fundamental contexts of national, cultural and economic systems which inform the development of media policy debates.

Journalism Independent Study (Option)
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Journalism Independent Study (Option)

Students undertake a dissertation topic of their choice within their chosen field of study and are expected to apply theoretical concepts to their research. They will be allocated an individual tutor to support their work but students are expected to demonstrate a high degree of personal commitment and to work on their own initiative.

Journalists on the Screen (Option)
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Journalists on the Screen (Option)

The purpose of this module is to examine and critically compare the different representations of journalists to be found in film and assess the relation between these portrayals and continuing moral and political issues faced by the profession. The module expects students to study movies in which journalists are portrayed as leading characters.

Peace and Conflict Reporting (Option)
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Peace and Conflict Reporting (Option)

This module explores the history of war reporting and the ways in which journalists have represented conflicts. It also considers the reasons why some conflicts are marginalised, ignored altogether or given extensive coverage by the mainstream media. It studies theoretical aspects and practical implications of conflict-sensitive reporting.

Professional Placement (Option)
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Professional Placement (Option)

Work experience is seen as essential in today's competitive jobs market. This module aims to give students the opportunity to experience the industries that can be linked to their studies, gain vital skills which may prepare them for the job market and also establish and maintain links with industry professionals who may help them in their chosen career.

Science Fiction (Option)
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Science Fiction (Option)

This module considers the genre of modern science fiction and its evolution into one of today’s most popular narrative genres. Analysing a variety of forms – novel, short story, drama, graphic novel and film – students will have the opportunity to examine the socio-historical contexts of some of the most influential narratives of this period.

This ranges from the emergence of “scientific romance” in the late nineteenth century, to late twentieth-century forms like cyberpunk and radical fantasy; from the problems of defining “genre fictions” and privileging science fiction over fantasy, to our enduring fascination with alternate histories, non-human agents (robots, animals, genetic hybrids, the environment), ecocatastrophe and post-apocalypse.

Specialist Journalism (Option)
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Specialist Journalism (Option)

Students have the opportunity to examine and analyse their chosen specialism across a wide range of publications, from general readership websites, magazines, and newspapers to specialist and niche publications aimed at the 'expert'. Students can study the particular attributes needed for specialist journalism including: authority, expertise, ability to access specialist information and format requirements. Throughout this module, students will select one particular strand to focus on in order to develop their specialism in the following indicative areas: sport, music, fashion, science, arts or business.

The Psychological Thriller and Crime Fiction (Option)
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The Psychological Thriller and Crime Fiction (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to some of the specific elements of writing contemporary fiction in the field of crime and the psychological thriller. The module will consider the origins of crime fiction in the nineteenth century before concentrating on what has become one of the most popular genres in contemporary publishing.

Writing for Children and Young Adults (Option)
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Writing for Children and Young Adults (Option)

This module will introduce some of the specific elements of writing contemporary fiction for children and young adults. The market for children's literature is an old one, and some historical context of that market will be presented throughout the workshop sessions, but the main focus will be providing practical experience of writing for a wide age range, whether more traditional children's books or the newly emerging young adult market.

Writing Historical Fiction (Option)
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Writing Historical Fiction (Option)

This module will introduce some of the specific elements of writing contemporary historical fiction. The field traditionally has been associated with romance writing, but it also encompasses a wide range of titles that frequently deal with aspects of war and violent historical events, and frequently has moved beyond genre writing into different forms of literary fiction.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

There are a number of extracurricular activities available for students to develop their writing skills. These include at the University’s student newspaper, news website and community and student radio stations, Siren FM and Brayford Radio, both based on campus.

Work experience can form part of the course and we encourage students to seek placements. Previous students in the School of English and Journalism have gained placements on well-known magazine brands or in areas such as public relations and copywriting. Students are expected to cover travel, accommodation and general living costs associated with their individual placement.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Work experience can form part of the course and we encourage students to seek placements. Previous students in the School of English and Journalism have gained placements on well-known magazine brands or in areas such as public relations and copywriting. Students are expected to cover travel, accommodation and general living costs associated with their individual placement.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

2018/19 UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,700 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,000 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

Students are expected to cover travel, accommodation and general living costs associated with their individual placement.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

EU and International students whose first language is not English will require English Language IELTS 7.0 with no less than 6.5 in each element, or equivalent http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Learn from Experts

This course is taught by academics, researchers and practising journalists. Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.


Your Future Career

The focus of this programme is on providing the professional skills students need to succeed as writers in the world of publishing or journalism. Graduates from our Journalism courses have gone on to work at national and local magazine brands across a variety of sectors, as well as in roles across a variety of media platforms.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.


Facilities

This course benefits from a suite of newsrooms, with associated work stations and specialist print production software. Broadcast journalism is catered for with exclusive access to the School’s radio and television presentation studios and opportunities for output on the University’s Ofcom-licensed community radio station.

Students also have access to a TV studio, where they have the opportunity to use the latest virtual studio technology to produce television news programmes.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.


This course has not been running at the University of Lincoln for a period long enough to provide its own data for the Key Information Set provides by Unistats.com. Data is currently drawn from similar subjects at the University of Lincoln rather than from this specific subject. If you would like to know more about this course we would strongly recommend that that you meet us at our next open day. Alternatively, talk to us about your future at the University of Lincoln by calling +44 (0) 1522 886644.
The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.

Journalism and Creative Writing