BA (Hons) Film and Television Studies

BA (Hons) Film and Television Studies

90% of BA (Hons) Film and Television Studies* students at the University of Lincoln stated they are satisfied overall with their course according to the National Student Survey 2018. *formerly BA (Hons) Film and Television.

The Course

The BA (Hons) Film and Television Studies is taught by research-active academics working in a variety of fields including national and heritage cinema, gender and sexuality, minority representation, children's TV, and shlock cinema.

You will be expected to advance arguments about film and television texts and the context of production, and to use critical and independent analysis to inform and evaluate production. The programme is designed to offer a choice of areas of study from the second year onwards so that you can shape your own learning according to your interests and ambitions. This theory-focused programme also offers practical modules so that you can engage more deeply with theory through practice in LSFM’s state-of-the-art production facilities with support from experienced media practitioners.

The Course

The BA (Hons) Film and Television Studies is a theoretically oriented critical studies degree enhanced by opportunities for creative and professional development. Practical work can enable students to deepen their understanding of the critical issues and key concepts of the discipline.

The course is taught by research-active staff working on a diverse range of topics, including the documentary, heritage cinema, children's film and TV, and representations of difference. Practical modules are delivered by active media professionals using industry-standard facilities and equipment.

You will have the opportunity to learn and develop through lectures, workshops, seminars, group projects, screenings, research and an independent study.

In the first year, four core modules introduce the theory, history, analysis and practice of film and television. During the second year, you can tailor your studies by choosing from a wide range of optional modules. In the third year, you can opt for a theory-only pathway, and can further specialize according to your interests by choosing from a palette of optional modules. All students complete an independent research study in the third year, developed and written under supervision by our research-active staff. You also have the choice of a final creative project in Film, Television or Script, or a project in the MACE archives.

During the second year, there are opportunities to take part in exchange programmes with one of our partner universities in Europe or the USA. Costs relating to the USA exchange programme can be found in the fees tab. Further information relating to exchanges within Europe can be found here:

http://lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/shortstudyopportunities/erasmusforstudents/

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Analysing Moving Image Texts (Core)
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Analysing Moving Image Texts (Core)

This module offers an opportunity to study and apply a wide range of methods of textual analysis to film and television texts. Through group discussion and seminar exercises students can develop a fluency in these analytical methods. This is underpinned by a range of complementary subjects which act as an introduction to the critical approaches taken in year two of the programme.

Film and TV History 1 (Core)
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Film and TV History 1 (Core)

Film and TV History 1: is an overview of early cinema from the age of invention to the widespread adoption of sound in the 1930s and the beginning of experimentation with TV. It focuses on Hollywood, to chart and analyse the ascendancy and dominance of Hollywood in the cinema, and in approaches to cinema.

Film and TV History 2 (Core)
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Film and TV History 2 (Core)

Film and TV History 2 is a survey of European film movements in context. It charts, analyses and reassesses the significance and novelty of, and the role of TV in the emergence of the various European new waves from Italian Neorealism through the French New Wave to the British New Wave and Free Cinema and New German Cinema.

Film and TV Theory (Core)
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Film and TV Theory (Core)

This introductory module in film and television theory is designed primarily to provide first-year students of Film and Television Studies with a thorough grounding of some of those debates and theories. As a core module, it will sit alongside other core offerings in Film/TV Appreciation, and Film History and those of practice, in order to prepare students for more specific study of Film and Television in later years of their study, equipping them with the skills to read films and television programmes through the theoretical lenses of their most prominent critics. It begins in the first semester with an overview of the canonical film texts and theorists, while in the second semester it will explore debates around television theory and the post-1960s critical turn.

Production Planning (Core)
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Production Planning (Core)

This module aims to introduce practical techniques, using multi-camera studio methods. Basic production organisation, script and planning methods are developed alongside critical and analytical understanding of television as a medium.

Script, Screenwriting and Realisation (Core)
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Script, Screenwriting and Realisation (Core)

This module gives an introduction to writing and storytelling for screen based media production. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own creative writing techniques informed by critical concepts. Creative exercises and independent application culminate in the production of a short film script followed through to its realisation.

Analysing Film and Television as Industries 1 (Core)
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Analysing Film and Television as Industries 1 (Core)

Students will have the opportunity to examine the political, commercial and cultural determinants behind the history, current organisation, and potential futures of the UK audiovisual production environment, including how it relates to the US and Europe.

British Television Drama (Option)
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British Television Drama (Option)

Drama is a key component of TV in the UK, carrying out a Public Service function and creating a sense of National Identity. The module considers continuing series (soap operas), drama serials, single plays and television films, situation comedy and comedy drama, underpinned by a survey of critical approaches.

Children’s Film and Television (Option)
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Children’s Film and Television (Option)

This module investigates and analyses the debates about and developments in children’s film and television, largely in the UK but drawing on the USA, for elements of comparison informed by politics, ideology and economics.

Documentary Now (Option)
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Documentary Now (Option)

This module explores the history and theory of the documentary film. It will introduce students to media texts (films, video, broadcast television and digital platforms) that claim, in distinction to the cinema of fiction, to capture and re-present unmediated – to one degree or another-- reality. Students on this module will be asked to consider, via close text analysis and an understanding of moving image history, the problematics of making such a claim. This will involve students investigating the nature of the documentary image – that is: the relationship of the signifier to the thing signified. It will require them to determine the ethical implications of documentary’s claim on the real for the filmmaker, the persons filmed and the spectators. It will engage them in debates about documentary’s impact in the social sphere. The module will be organised around a series of case studies. Students will gain an understanding of media texts that have had a significant impact on society, knowledge of history and theory of documentary, and skills in close text reading and historical reception studies.

East Asian Cinemas (Option)
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East Asian Cinemas (Option)

A guide to specific films and accompanying theoretical concepts. Key films provide a platform for debating the political, institutional and cultural context of individual cinemas and regions in an increasingly globalised industry where audiences and producers are exposed to a variety of film styles. Critical engagement and debate are encouraged within the broader structure of World Cinema, alongside cultural and globalisation studies.

English for Academic Purposes (media) (Option)
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English for Academic Purposes (media) (Option)

This module aims to support students’ understanding and use of English language in the context of the media, and thereby enhance their ability to meet the demands of academic study at the University of Lincoln.

Film and Television Study Period Abroad (Erasmus) (Option)
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Film and Television Study Period Abroad (Erasmus) (Option)

The Klagenfurt Erasmus Exchange Programme is an optional module of study for the award of the BA Film & Television degree. As part of the three-year course, some students may study for the duration of Term 1 of Level 2 at the University of Klagenfurt, Austria. The target modules of study include areas of practical and theoretical studies comparable with those of Level 2 study for the Film & Television award at Lincoln.

During the term abroad, Lincoln students will be based in the Institute of Media and Communication Studies and will share classes and modules of study with peers from Austria and other European countries. Not only will students be living and socialising in another culture, providing opportunities to study their respective countries, they will also have an opportunity to engage, free-of-charge, in an intensive German-language module for three weeks before term begins (although academic and practice teaching and learning will be in the medium of English for Lincoln exchange students, except in rare instances when a student may be fluent in German).

Film and Television Study Period Abroad (USA) (Option)
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Film and Television Study Period Abroad (USA) (Option)

The Minnesota State University Moorhead USA Exchange Programme is an optional module for the award of the BA Film and Television Degree. As part of the three-year course, some students may study for the duration of Term 1 of level 2 at Minnesota State University Moorhead USA. The target units of study include areas of practical and theoretical studies comparable with those of Level 2 study for the Film and Television Award at Lincoln.

During the semester abroad, students will share classes and units of study with local students. Not only will students be living and socialising in another 'culture' providing opportunities to study their respective countries, they may also have an opportunity to examine USA media industry practice through optional Internships for exchange students. The Moorhead-Fargo twin cities also offer practical opportunities for students to engage with USA production companies including, Fox, ABC and Prairie Public TV (PBS), all of whom have local bases.

Film Production Projects (Option)
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Film Production Projects (Option)

This module aims to enable students to further develop skills in single camera production and apply them to a range of genre projects. Lectures look to present best practice in production techniques and offer stimulus for idea development in production projects. Workshops will target the development of technical skills in camera operation, lighting, sound recording, post production, non-linear editing and multi track facilities as well as creative approaches to production and directing. Seminars aim to provide a programme of student support for production teams conducting a range of creative projects.

Film, Television and Creative Vision (Option)
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Film, Television and Creative Vision (Option)

Three different determinants for a film or broadcast text will be considered - the author, the genre and the production/distribution institution. Students will be given the opportunity to debate the relative importance of these three determinants to a number of case studies. This analysis will be underpinned through a consideration of the development and utility of each of the approaches.

Globalisation and Contemporary Culture (Option)
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Globalisation and Contemporary Culture (Option)

This module aims to provide an overview of conceptual themes and issues within the culture industry and the arts in relation to globalisation. Debates brought forward include: national and cultural identity, global representation, global technologies, multiculturalism, transnationalism, cosmopolitanism and global activism channels.

Hollywood Musical (Option)
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Hollywood Musical (Option)

This module will look at the history and development of the Hollywood musical as one of Hollywood’s most popular and important film genres, from its beginnings in the early sound era to the integrated musical of the 1940s and 1950s to cult films like The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) and more recent successes such as Moulin Rouge (2001), High School Musical 3: Senior Year (2008), Mamma Mia! (2008) and La La Land (2016).

Students can watch together a number of significant films and will have the opportunity to discuss structural, stylistic and thematic issues in the context of scholarly literature. Stardom and the function of the star performance will be considered and we will explore the musical’s representation of cultural issues in a variety of contexts such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality and gender.

Media, Controversy and Moral Panic (Option)
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Media, Controversy and Moral Panic (Option)

This module explores the history of media controversy and ‘moral panic’ during the twentieth century. It is designed to introduce students to media texts (especially films and television programmes) that have sparked debate and extreme differences of opinion among audiences in Britain and America. Students will be expected to engage with a range of films, television programmes and primary source material, which may include newspapers and television news broadcasts from the Media Archive of Central England (MACE).

Multi Camera Projects (Option)
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Multi Camera Projects (Option)

This module will include advanced studio production techniques, programme development, planning, script development, role practice, set design, graphics/overlays, lighting and programme running paperwork. Exercises are designed to help students to develop advanced studio practices, facilitating the production of work to an industry standard.

Public Service Broadcasting (Option)
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Public Service Broadcasting (Option)

Students are given the opportunity to study the concept, history and possible future of Public Service Broadcasting in the UK. The implications of broadcasting policy and reports from government committees on broadcasting will be considered in relation to the formation of the concept of Public Service Broadcasting.

Realism in Narrative Fiction (Option)
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Realism in Narrative Fiction (Option)

This module aims to develop an understanding of the complex problem of realism in film and media studies as it relates to fictional narrative forms. Students will have the opportunity to engage with academic debates around realist texts and examine these in relation to historical, contemporary and potential examples.

Representing Difference (Option)
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Representing Difference (Option)

Methods of analysis of media representations and approaches to representing difference will be considered in this module as well as issues such as class, gender, nationality and 'race,' ethnicity, sexuality and (dis)ability apparent in film & broadcast media. A range of critical approaches will be considered.

Script and Screenwriting Projects (Option)
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Script and Screenwriting Projects (Option)

Initially elements of craft will be presented in lectures and practised during workshops as students create their own short scripts. Students can develop scripts from an initial idea through to final draft. Students will also have the opportunity to study the craft of writing longer scripts for radio, film and TV, supported by an analysis of the craft of writing for these media.

Television and Screen Entertainment (Option)
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Television and Screen Entertainment (Option)

Through a critical examination of contemporary factual television and online culture, this module aims to show that this can be understood as having been dramatically reconfigured in recent years by socio-political and commercial pressures and their associated entertainment values and changing discourses of selfhood.

Women and the Movies: Stars, Genre and Audiences (Core)
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Women and the Movies: Stars, Genre and Audiences (Core)

This module is concerned with the cultural construction of womanhood, the 'female' and notions of femininity: the economic and cultural value of the female film star to Hollywood, the development of female film genres or the feminization of certain genres, how debates about female identity inform models of spectatorship, with respect to both psychoanalysis and ethnography.

Art Cinemas (Option)
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Art Cinemas (Option)

Art Cinemas will focus on moving-image practice at the intersection of art and media. Work studied will range from early film experiments to contemporary gallery-based video. Teaching will be a mixture of lectures, screenings and seminars with a trip organised to a relevant exhibition where possible. Students will be assessed by essay and a curatorial assignment, helping them develop practical skills in presenting such work in a public context.

Exploitation Cinema (Option)
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Exploitation Cinema (Option)

Examines the cultural significance of so-called exploitation films, which can reveal (and revel in) themes, images and narratives suppressed from the mainstream, dealing with lurid, scandalous subjects in a seemingly excessive, gratuitous manner. Some theorists argue that perceived ‘excess’ is a foundation for developing new critical methods, providing a fascinating alternative to approaches more comfortably contained within ‘classical’ systems.

Film and Television Under Pressure (Option)
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Film and Television Under Pressure (Option)

Investigates current challenges and difficulties facing film and TV and resultant complications in studying them. One-way production and consumption processes compete with non-linear, responsive or interactive “media“ such as the internet, social networking and computer games. Film and TV are stretching to fit these developments, with fascinating, often unpredicable, consequences.

Film/TV Production Project (Option)
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Film/TV Production Project (Option)

One advanced concept-led project or project portfolio using technologies centred upon Single Camera, Multi Camera or Scriptwriting; an opportunity to produce practical work to an advanced level of creativity and to undertake interdisciplinary production with students on other School courses as appropriate.

Hollywood cinema in the 1980s (Option)
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Hollywood cinema in the 1980s (Option)

Cinema is an integral part of our culture and tells us about society; like any cultural product, cinema does not exist in a vacuum. It communicates ideas, value systems and cultural beliefs, desires, dreams, anxieties, fears and needs of a given society at a given time, and it does so through different constructions of gender, sexualities, whiteness, ethnicity, race, age, social class and cultures. Taking into account a broad range of films and genres (from rom-com, drama and erotic thriller, to animation, musical, neo-noir, action and sci-fi), as well as a variety of theoretical approaches from (but not limited to) feminist film theory, philosophy, post-feminism, psychoanalysis, stardom and cultural studies; and combining textual analysis with background reading, this module will examine and critically evaluate a range of Hollywood films produced and released in the 1980s addressing the relations between their textual form and their cultural context.

Identity in the Animated Film (Option)
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Identity in the Animated Film (Option)

Animation is a malleable form: it can portray bodies in blurred motion and extraordinary feats, frame by frame. Animation is limitless and all pervasive, transcending genres, distorting genders and having the power to dissect stereotypes. Gender can be constructed and deconstructed, narratives can transcend the confines that might limit live action cinema. The idea of animation as a genre of film continues to be contested, it demands its own medium and a plethora of genres within that medium. With its ability to inform and revolutionise, animation is ever-evolving and can educate, but also perpetuate inequalities of power through its depictions of difference, disability and the stigmas attached to such representations. Animation bends and contorts, it ventures far beyond the confines of children’s entertainment into the realms of horror, documentary, pornography, etc. It gives us astonishing insights into identity through its figuration, configuration and reconfiguration of the body, otherness, erasure, power and punishment.

This module will introduce students to theories of identity, difference, diaspora, the body and the disabled self and apply these to key animation texts and directors, through a series of lectures and seminars. Learners will debate concepts, characters and ideas about difference throughout this module, using identity theories as markers of understanding, and produce an essay that is enriched by what they have discovered.

Journalists on the Screen (Option)
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Journalists on the Screen (Option)

The purpose of this module is to examine and critically compare the different representations of journalists to be found in film and assess the relation between these portrayals and continuing moral and political issues faced by the profession. The module expects students to study movies in which journalists are portrayed as leading characters.

Literature, Film and Gender (Option)
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Literature, Film and Gender (Option)

This module explores a wide range of gender topics (masculinities, the backlash against feminism, crossdressing, queer theory, and transgendering) through a variety of literary texts and films. Shakespeare, Ibsen, Hardy, and Woolf, are considered alongside more popular fiction by writers such as Susanna Moore, and films, including Priscilla: Queen of the Desert and The Crying Game.

MACE Internship - 24 weeks (Option)
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MACE Internship - 24 weeks (Option)

The course provides an opportunity for up to two students to undertake a work placement in MACE. The placement not only gives the student invaluable working experience but will concentrate on an agreed piece of practical archive work through which to develop a deeper critical awareness of the role and impact of a moving image archive. The culmination of the placement will be a written critical assessment of the placement and of the specific project undertaken.

Mad Pictures (Option)
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Mad Pictures (Option)

Moving images have explored madness, the real, nightmares and fantasy since the beginning of cinema. Mad scientists from Caligari and Rotwang through Dr Gogol to Rick Sanchez have wreaked havoc, reconfigured the human body, opened portals into new dimensions and ushered in devastating social change. Films have told stories of men driving women into insanity in pursuit of power, fame and glory. Bodies that have challenged arbitrary norms or misfit with normative spatial arrangements have been represented as psychotic killers, extra-terrestrial monsters and subhuman beasts. This module explores representations of madness in cinema to explore attitudes to mental health via a mix of interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks in a variety of national cinema settings and in a range of genres and registers, from classical Hollywood horror through European auteur cinema to digitally distributed transnational quality long form drama.

Media Independent Study (Core)
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Media Independent Study (Core)

A 10,000-word dissertation is the culmination of the student's undergraduate investigation into the structures and debates surrounding cultural production and takes the form of an extended essay. Regular support and supervision ensures that the chosen subject facilitates involvement with issues relevant to contemporary media practice.

Queer Film and Television (Option)
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Queer Film and Television (Option)

Portrayals of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender lives on screen are under increasing scrutiny from audiences, activists and media scholars. But, for much of the history of film and television, non-normative sexual and gender identities have been marginalised or hidden. This module examines the history of queer representations in screen culture from the era of silent films to the present day. Students will have the opportunity to work with examples from a range of national contexts, including (but not limited to) Britain and America, as well as engaging with influential scholarship in queer theory and the history of gender and sexuality.

Representing the Unrepresentable (Option)
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Representing the Unrepresentable (Option)

Schindler’s List (1993) met critical acclaim and commercial success – but furore in some quarters, not only for how it represented the Holocaust but for daring to represent it at all. Using this example as a reference point, the module critically examines several moving picture accounts of the Holocaust in the context of long-standing debates around the nature, ethics, and function of documentary, drama-documentary, and fictionalisation.

Science Fiction in Film and Television (Option)
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Science Fiction in Film and Television (Option)

This module analyses the range and diversity of a genre encompassing many highly popular texts. Metaphor and allegory are explored to understand how science fiction has been appreciated and has developed from cult to mainstream acceptance and popularity. Innovation and cross-fertilisation of generic forms are also be considered.

The New Hollywood 1967 - 1983: from The Graduate to Star Wars and beyond... (Option)
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The New Hollywood 1967 - 1983: from The Graduate to Star Wars and beyond... (Option)

This module surveys and assesses a period that represents a break with a range of ideological, aesthetic and commercial traditions together with a process of retrenchment and recuperation. Post-classical Hollywood saw both films and the industry experience ideological and socio-cultural upheaval, demonstrated through cinematic modes of representation, industrial re-structuring and artistic transformations.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Varied modes of assessment are used on this programme, including critical essays, presentations and viewing logs. Practical work is assessed by experienced media industry professionals. There are no formal examinations.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

We do not specify A-level subjects but seek evidence of media-related creativity and/or critical awareness such as qualifications in English, Art, Design, Media, Theatre, Sociology or Film Studies.

We particularly value personal statements that demonstrate relevant experience, a broad range of interests and a real passion for learning about film and television.

Research-active Staff

Film and media academics conduct internationally recognised research in a variety of topics, including star studies, exploitation cinema, national cinemas and heritage film. The School hosts the Entangled Media and the Extra Sonic Practices research groups and the pioneering Collaboration Laboratory Research Network Co_LAB, which brings together people from different fields, disciplines and contexts to develop new approaches to collaborative teaching and learning through the use of networked digital tools and the transferral of knowledge, skills and pedagogies.

Industry Links

Many academic staff in the School are current media practitioners who are engaged with professional bodies, such as the Royal Television Society, the British Society of Cinematographers and the British Association of Film, Television and Screen Studies, ensuring that course content is informed by the latest industry developments. BAFTA-winning television dramatist Neil McKay and documentary-maker Nick Gray are visiting professors in the School.

Visiting Speakers

Students on this course have the opportunity to hear from visiting guest speakers from many parts of the Film and TV industries. See here for details:

http://lincoln.ac.uk/home/fm/abouttheschool/

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD

Students on this course will receive a licence for Adobe Creative Cloud free of charge.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

There are no mandatory additional activities, which will incur a cost on this course.

Project costs can vary depending on the nature of the practical work chosen by the student. Students are asked to consider costs when proposing a project. There are funds currently available within the School to students at all levels to provide support with such projects.

Study abroad outside of Europe

Exchange students applying to study outside of Europe do not pay tuition fees at their host university.

Participants will usually be responsible for all other costs themselves, including travel, accommodation, visas, insurance, vaccinations and administrative fees at the host institution.

Students going on exchange keep their entitlement to UK sources of funding such as student loans and should apply to their awarding body in the normal way, indicating that they will be studying abroad.

If your time away is a mandatory part of your degree programme, you may be entitled to extra funding. You should ask your funding body about this.

You may also be able to apply to your LEA or the SAAS for further funding to assist with travel expenses - contact them to enquire.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus to provide the best learning environment for our students. You can study in style and comfort in our well-resourced library or complete group work and exchange ideas in innovative learning spaces across the campus. There is access to the latest equipment and cutting-edge laboratories for studies in the sciences and social sciences. There are modern studios and well-equipped workshops for practice in the arts, and industry-standard production facilities for a range of media including some of the best TV and audio facilities in UK Universities. On some courses, students will need additional, specialist resources or equipment to enable them to pursue their courses. Where appropriate these will be provided by the relevant School.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above.

Applicants will also be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (or the equivalent), including English.

Mature students with extensive relevant work experience and a portfolio of work, will be selected on individual merit. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

Degree preparation courses for international students:

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Unconditional Offer Scheme

The University of Lincoln Unconditional Offer Scheme has been created to identify outstanding undergraduate applicants who we think would excel at Lincoln and make a significant contribution to our academic community.

The University of Lincoln takes a holistic contextual view, looking at students in the round, including all the information supplied in their application and any additional relevant assessment required, such as a portfolio, or interview. The qualities required for success are therefore not exclusively academic, and students’ drive, ambition, creativity, and potential are important factors in those considered for the scheme.

Applicants selected for the scheme, who commit to the University of Lincoln as their first choice of university, will receive an unconditional offer. We expect students in receipt of an unconditional offer to continue to apply themselves in their studies, both at school and when they join our academic community here at Lincoln. In previous years students who were selected and joined through the Lincoln unconditional offer scheme have shown very good success rate in their studies.

Find out more about the Unconditional Offer Scheme

You will have the opportunity to learn and develop through lectures, workshops, seminars, group projects, screenings, research and an independent study.

In the first year, this degree provides an overview of the theory, history and analysis of film and television. It offers a theoretically informed introduction to film and TV practice. In the second year, an increasing number of optional modules allows students to forge their own path according to their research and creative interests. In the final year, students complete an independent study and choose between theory, a creative project and archival research pathways.

During the second year, there are opportunities to take part in exchange programmes with one of our partner universities in Europe or the USA. Costs relating to the USA exchange programme can be found in the fees tab. Further information relating to exchanges within Europe can be found here:

http://lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/shortstudyopportunities/erasmusforstudents/

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Analysing Moving Image Texts (Core)
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Analysing Moving Image Texts (Core)

This module offers an opportunity to study and apply a wide range of methods of textual analysis to film and television texts. Through group discussion and seminar exercises students can develop a fluency in these analytical methods. This is underpinned by a range of complementary subjects which act as an introduction to the critical approaches taken in year two of the programme.

Film and TV History 1 (Core)
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Film and TV History 1 (Core)

Film and TV History 1: is an overview of early cinema from the age of invention to the widespread adoption of sound in the 1930s and the beginning of experimentation with TV. It focuses on Hollywood, to chart and analyse the ascendancy and dominance of Hollywood in the cinema, and in approaches to cinema.

Film and TV History 2 (Core)
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Film and TV History 2 (Core)

Film and TV History 2 is a survey of European film movements in context. It charts, analyses and reassesses the significance and novelty of, and the role of TV in the emergence of the various European new waves from Italian Neorealism through the French New Wave to the British New Wave and Free Cinema and New German Cinema.

Film and TV Theory (Core)
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Film and TV Theory (Core)

This introductory module in film and television theory is designed primarily to provide first-year students of Film and Television Studies with a thorough grounding of some of those debates and theories. As a core module, it will sit alongside other core offerings in Film/TV Appreciation, and Film History and those of practice, in order to prepare students for more specific study of Film and Television in later years of their study, equipping them with the skills to read films and television programmes through the theoretical lenses of their most prominent critics. It begins in the first semester with an overview of the canonical film texts and theorists, while in the second semester it will explore debates around television theory and the post-1960s critical turn.

Production Planning (Core)
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Production Planning (Core)

This module aims to introduce practical techniques, using multi-camera studio methods. Basic production organisation, script and planning methods are developed alongside critical and analytical understanding of television as a medium.

Script, Screenwriting and Realisation (Core)
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Script, Screenwriting and Realisation (Core)

This module gives an introduction to writing and storytelling for screen based media production. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own creative writing techniques informed by critical concepts. Creative exercises and independent application culminate in the production of a short film script followed through to its realisation.

Analysing Film and Television as Industries 1 (Core)
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Analysing Film and Television as Industries 1 (Core)

Students will have the opportunity to examine the political, commercial and cultural determinants behind the history, current organisation, and potential futures of the UK audiovisual production environment, including how it relates to the US and Europe.

British Television Drama (Option)
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British Television Drama (Option)

Drama is a key component of TV in the UK, carrying out a Public Service function and creating a sense of National Identity. The module considers continuing series (soap operas), drama serials, single plays and television films, situation comedy and comedy drama, underpinned by a survey of critical approaches.

Children’s Film and Television (Option)
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Children’s Film and Television (Option)

This module investigates and analyses the debates about and developments in children’s film and television, largely in the UK but drawing on the USA, for elements of comparison informed by politics, ideology and economics.

Documentary Now (Option)
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Documentary Now (Option)

This module explores the history and theory of the documentary film. It will introduce students to media texts (films, video, broadcast television and digital platforms) that claim, in distinction to the cinema of fiction, to capture and re-present unmediated – to one degree or another-- reality. Students on this module will be asked to consider, via close text analysis and an understanding of moving image history, the problematics of making such a claim. This will involve students investigating the nature of the documentary image – that is: the relationship of the signifier to the thing signified. It will require them to determine the ethical implications of documentary’s claim on the real for the filmmaker, the persons filmed and the spectators. It will engage them in debates about documentary’s impact in the social sphere. The module will be organised around a series of case studies. Students will gain an understanding of media texts that have had a significant impact on society, knowledge of history and theory of documentary, and skills in close text reading and historical reception studies.

East Asian Cinemas (Option)
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East Asian Cinemas (Option)

A guide to specific films and accompanying theoretical concepts. Key films provide a platform for debating the political, institutional and cultural context of individual cinemas and regions in an increasingly globalised industry where audiences and producers are exposed to a variety of film styles. Critical engagement and debate are encouraged within the broader structure of World Cinema, alongside cultural and globalisation studies.

English for Academic Purposes (media) (Option)
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English for Academic Purposes (media) (Option)

This module aims to support students’ understanding and use of English language in the context of the media, and thereby enhance their ability to meet the demands of academic study at the University of Lincoln.

Film and Television Study Period Abroad (Erasmus) (Option)
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Film and Television Study Period Abroad (Erasmus) (Option)

The Klagenfurt Erasmus Exchange Programme is an optional module of study for the award of the BA Film & Television degree. As part of the three-year course, some students may study for the duration of Term 1 of Level 2 at the University of Klagenfurt, Austria. The target modules of study include areas of practical and theoretical studies comparable with those of Level 2 study for the Film & Television award at Lincoln.

During the term abroad, Lincoln students will be based in the Institute of Media and Communication Studies and will share classes and modules of study with peers from Austria and other European countries. Not only will students be living and socialising in another culture, providing opportunities to study their respective countries, they will also have an opportunity to engage, free-of-charge, in an intensive German-language module for three weeks before term begins (although academic and practice teaching and learning will be in the medium of English for Lincoln exchange students, except in rare instances when a student may be fluent in German).

Film and Television Study Period Abroad (USA) (Option)
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Film and Television Study Period Abroad (USA) (Option)

The Minnesota State University Moorhead USA Exchange Programme is an optional module for the award of the BA Film and Television Degree. As part of the three-year course, some students may study for the duration of Term 1 of level 2 at Minnesota State University Moorhead USA. The target units of study include areas of practical and theoretical studies comparable with those of Level 2 study for the Film and Television Award at Lincoln.

During the semester abroad, students will share classes and units of study with local students. Not only will students be living and socialising in another 'culture' providing opportunities to study their respective countries, they may also have an opportunity to examine USA media industry practice through optional Internships for exchange students. The Moorhead-Fargo twin cities also offer practical opportunities for students to engage with USA production companies including, Fox, ABC and Prairie Public TV (PBS), all of whom have local bases.

Film Production Projects (Option)
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Film Production Projects (Option)

This module aims to enable students to further develop skills in single camera production and apply them to a range of genre projects. Lectures look to present best practice in production techniques and offer stimulus for idea development in production projects. Workshops will target the development of technical skills in camera operation, lighting, sound recording, post production, non-linear editing and multi track facilities as well as creative approaches to production and directing. Seminars aim to provide a programme of student support for production teams conducting a range of creative projects.

Film, Television and Creative Vision (Option)
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Film, Television and Creative Vision (Option)

Three different determinants for a film or broadcast text will be considered - the author, the genre and the production/distribution institution. Students will be given the opportunity to debate the relative importance of these three determinants to a number of case studies. This analysis will be underpinned through a consideration of the development and utility of each of the approaches.

Globalisation and Contemporary Culture (Option)
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Globalisation and Contemporary Culture (Option)

This module aims to provide an overview of conceptual themes and issues within the culture industry and the arts in relation to globalisation. Debates brought forward include: national and cultural identity, global representation, global technologies, multiculturalism, transnationalism, cosmopolitanism and global activism channels.

Hollywood Musical (Option)
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Hollywood Musical (Option)

This module will look at the history and development of the Hollywood musical as one of Hollywood’s most popular and important film genres, from its beginnings in the early sound era to the integrated musical of the 1940s and 1950s to cult films like The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) and more recent successes such as Moulin Rouge (2001), High School Musical 3: Senior Year (2008), Mamma Mia! (2008) and La La Land (2016).

Students can watch together a number of significant films and will have the opportunity to discuss structural, stylistic and thematic issues in the context of scholarly literature. Stardom and the function of the star performance will be considered and we will explore the musical’s representation of cultural issues in a variety of contexts such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality and gender.

Media, Controversy and Moral Panic (Option)
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Media, Controversy and Moral Panic (Option)

This module explores the history of media controversy and ‘moral panic’ during the twentieth century. It is designed to introduce students to media texts (especially films and television programmes) that have sparked debate and extreme differences of opinion among audiences in Britain and America. Students will be expected to engage with a range of films, television programmes and primary source material, which may include newspapers and television news broadcasts from the Media Archive of Central England (MACE).

Multi Camera Projects (Option)
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Multi Camera Projects (Option)

This module will include advanced studio production techniques, programme development, planning, script development, role practice, set design, graphics/overlays, lighting and programme running paperwork. Exercises are designed to help students to develop advanced studio practices, facilitating the production of work to an industry standard.

Public Service Broadcasting (Option)
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Public Service Broadcasting (Option)

Students are given the opportunity to study the concept, history and possible future of Public Service Broadcasting in the UK. The implications of broadcasting policy and reports from government committees on broadcasting will be considered in relation to the formation of the concept of Public Service Broadcasting.

Realism in Narrative Fiction (Option)
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Realism in Narrative Fiction (Option)

This module aims to develop an understanding of the complex problem of realism in film and media studies as it relates to fictional narrative forms. Students will have the opportunity to engage with academic debates around realist texts and examine these in relation to historical, contemporary and potential examples.

Representing Difference (Option)
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Representing Difference (Option)

Methods of analysis of media representations and approaches to representing difference will be considered in this module as well as issues such as gender, nationality and ethnicity apparent in film & broadcast media. A range of critical approaches will be considered and contrasted and Post-colonial theory and Third Cinema will be utilised in relation to these.

Script and Screenwriting Projects (Option)
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Script and Screenwriting Projects (Option)

Initially elements of craft will be presented in lectures and practised during workshops as students create their own short scripts. Students can develop scripts from an initial idea through to final draft. Students will also have the opportunity to study the craft of writing longer scripts for radio, film and TV, supported by an analysis of the craft of writing for these media.

Television and Screen Entertainment (Option)
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Television and Screen Entertainment (Option)

Through a critical examination of contemporary factual television and online culture, this module aims to show that this can be understood as having been dramatically reconfigured in recent years by socio-political and commercial pressures and their associated entertainment values and changing discourses of selfhood.

Women and the Movies: Stars, Genre and Audiences (Core)
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Women and the Movies: Stars, Genre and Audiences (Core)

This module is concerned with the cultural construction of womanhood, the 'female' and notions of femininity: the economic and cultural value of the female film star to Hollywood, the development of female film genres or the feminization of certain genres, how debates about female identity inform models of spectatorship, with respect to both psychoanalysis and ethnography.

Art Cinemas (Option)
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Art Cinemas (Option)

Art Cinemas will focus on moving-image practice at the intersection of art and media. Work studied will range from early film experiments to contemporary gallery-based video. Teaching will be a mixture of lectures, screenings and seminars with a trip organised to a relevant exhibition where possible. Students will be assessed by essay and a curatorial assignment, helping them develop practical skills in presenting such work in a public context.

Exploitation Cinema (Option)
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Exploitation Cinema (Option)

Examines the cultural significance of so-called exploitation films, which can reveal (and revel in) themes, images and narratives suppressed from the mainstream, dealing with lurid, scandalous subjects in a seemingly excessive, gratuitous manner. Some theorists argue that perceived ‘excess’ is a foundation for developing new critical methods, providing a fascinating alternative to approaches more comfortably contained within ‘classical’ systems.

Film and Television Under Pressure (Option)
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Film and Television Under Pressure (Option)

Investigates current challenges and difficulties facing film and TV and resultant complications in studying them. One-way production and consumption processes compete with non-linear, responsive or interactive “media“ such as the internet, social networking and computer games. Film and TV are stretching to fit these developments, with fascinating, often unpredicable, consequences.

Film/TV Production Project (Option)
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Film/TV Production Project (Option)

One advanced concept-led project or project portfolio using technologies centred upon Single Camera, Multi Camera or Scriptwriting; an opportunity to produce practical work to an advanced level of creativity and to undertake interdisciplinary production with students on other School courses as appropriate.

Hollywood cinema in the 1980s (Option)
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Hollywood cinema in the 1980s (Option)

Cinema is an integral part of our culture and tells us about society; like any cultural product, cinema does not exist in a vacuum. It communicates ideas, value systems and cultural beliefs, desires, dreams, anxieties, fears and needs of a given society at a given time, and it does so through different constructions of gender, sexualities, whiteness, ethnicity, race, age, social class and cultures. Taking into account a broad range of films and genres (from rom-com, drama and erotic thriller, to animation, musical, neo-noir, action and sci-fi), as well as a variety of theoretical approaches from (but not limited to) feminist film theory, philosophy, post-feminism, psychoanalysis, stardom and cultural studies; and combining textual analysis with background reading, this module will examine and critically evaluate a range of Hollywood films produced and released in the 1980s addressing the relations between their textual form and their cultural context.

Identity in the Animated Film (Option)
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Identity in the Animated Film (Option)

Animation is a malleable form: it can portray bodies in blurred motion and extraordinary feats, frame by frame. Animation is limitless and all pervasive, transcending genres, distorting genders and having the power to dissect stereotypes. Gender can be constructed and deconstructed, narratives can transcend the confines that might limit live action cinema. The idea of animation as a genre of film continues to be contested, it demands its own medium and a plethora of genres within that medium. With its ability to inform and revolutionise, animation is ever-evolving and can educate, but also perpetuate inequalities of power through its depictions of difference, disability and the stigmas attached to such representations. Animation bends and contorts, it ventures far beyond the confines of children’s entertainment into the realms of horror, documentary, pornography, etc. It gives us astonishing insights into identity through its figuration, configuration and reconfiguration of the body, otherness, erasure, power and punishment.

This module will introduce students to theories of identity, difference, diaspora, the body and the disabled self and apply these to key animation texts and directors, through a series of lectures and seminars. Learners will debate concepts, characters and ideas about difference throughout this module, using identity theories as markers of understanding, and produce an essay that is enriched by what they have discovered.

Journalists on the Screen (Option)
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Journalists on the Screen (Option)

The purpose of this module is to examine and critically compare the different representations of journalists to be found in film and assess the relation between these portrayals and continuing moral and political issues faced by the profession. The module expects students to study movies in which journalists are portrayed as leading characters.

Literature, Film and Gender (Option)
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Literature, Film and Gender (Option)

This module explores a wide range of gender topics (masculinities, the backlash against feminism, crossdressing, queer theory, and transgendering) through a variety of literary texts and films. Shakespeare, Ibsen, Hardy, and Woolf, are considered alongside more popular fiction by writers such as Susanna Moore, and films, including Priscilla: Queen of the Desert and The Crying Game.

MACE Internship - 24 weeks (Option)
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MACE Internship - 24 weeks (Option)

The course provides an opportunity for up to two students to undertake a work placement in MACE. The placement not only gives the student invaluable working experience but will concentrate on an agreed piece of practical archive work through which to develop a deeper critical awareness of the role and impact of a moving image archive. The culmination of the placement will be a written critical assessment of the placement and of the specific project undertaken.

Mad Pictures (Option)
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Mad Pictures (Option)

Moving images have explored madness, the real, nightmares and fantasy since the beginning of cinema. Mad scientists from Caligari and Rotwang through Dr Gogol to Rick Sanchez have wreaked havoc, reconfigured the human body, opened portals into new dimensions and ushered in devastating social change. Films have told stories of men driving women into insanity in pursuit of power, fame and glory. Bodies that have challenged arbitrary norms or misfit with normative spatial arrangements have been represented as psychotic killers, extra-terrestrial monsters and subhuman beasts. This module explores representations of madness in cinema to explore attitudes to mental health via a mix of interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks in a variety of national cinema settings and in a range of genres and registers, from classical Hollywood horror through European auteur cinema to digitally distributed transnational quality long form drama.

Media Independent Study (Core)
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Media Independent Study (Core)

A 10,000-word dissertation is the culmination of the student's undergraduate investigation into the structures and debates surrounding cultural production and takes the form of an extended essay. Regular support and supervision ensures that the chosen subject facilitates involvement with issues relevant to contemporary media practice.

Queer Film and Television (Option)
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Queer Film and Television (Option)

Portrayals of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender lives on screen are under increasing scrutiny from audiences, activists and media scholars. But, for much of the history of film and television, non-normative sexual and gender identities have been marginalised or hidden. This module examines the history of queer representations in screen culture from the era of silent films to the present day. Students will have the opportunity to work with examples from a range of national contexts, including (but not limited to) Britain and America, as well as engaging with influential scholarship in queer theory and the history of gender and sexuality.

Representing the Unrepresentable (Option)
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Representing the Unrepresentable (Option)

Schindler’s List (1993) met critical acclaim and commercial success – but furore in some quarters, not only for how it represented the Holocaust but for daring to represent it at all. Using this example as a reference point, the module critically examines several moving picture accounts of the Holocaust in the context of long-standing debates around the nature, ethics, and function of documentary, drama-documentary, and fictionalisation.

Science Fiction in Film and Television (Option)
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Science Fiction in Film and Television (Option)

This module analyses the range and diversity of a genre encompassing many highly popular texts. Metaphor and allegory are explored to understand how science fiction has been appreciated and has developed from cult to mainstream acceptance and popularity. Innovation and cross-fertilisation of generic forms are also be considered.

The New Hollywood 1967 - 1983: from The Graduate to Star Wars and beyond... (Option)
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The New Hollywood 1967 - 1983: from The Graduate to Star Wars and beyond... (Option)

This module surveys and assesses a period that represents a break with a range of ideological, aesthetic and commercial traditions together with a process of retrenchment and recuperation. Post-classical Hollywood saw both films and the industry experience ideological and socio-cultural upheaval, demonstrated through cinematic modes of representation, industrial re-structuring and artistic transformations.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Varied modes of assessment are used on this programme, including critical essays, presentations and viewing logs. Practical work is assessed by experienced media industry professionals. There are no formal examinations.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

We do not specify A-level subjects but seek evidence of media-related creativity and/or critical awareness such as qualifications in English, Art, Design, Media, Theatre, Sociology or Film Studies.

We particularly value personal statements that demonstrate relevant experience, a broad range of interests and a real passion for learning about film and television.

Research-active Staff

This degree is taught by a vibrant community of Film and Television Studies academics of established and emerging international recognition affiliated with one or more of the School's research groups. Dr Gabor Gergely has published books on Hungarian cinema and émigré actors in classical Hollywood, and is currently researching foreignness and Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Film and media academics conduct internationally recognised research in a variety of topics, including star studies, exploitation cinema, national cinemas and heritage film. The School hosts the Entangled Media and the Extra Sonic Practices research groups and the pioneering Collaboration Laboratory Research Network Co_LAB, which brings together people from different fields, disciplines and contexts to develop new approaches to collaborative teaching and learning through the use of networked digital tools and the transferral of knowledge, skills and pedagogies.

Work Experience

There are work experience opportunities through both the University's career service and our social enterprise New Media Lincs, some of which are paid.

Industry Links

Many academic staff in the School are current media practitioners who are engaged with professional bodies, such as the Royal Television Society, the British Society of Cinematographers and the British Association of Film, Television and Screen Studies, ensuring that course content is informed by the latest industry developments. BAFTA-winning television dramatist Neil McKay and documentary-maker Nick Gray are visiting professors in the School.

Visiting Speakers

Students on this course have the opportunity to hear from visiting guest speakers from many parts of the Film and TV industries. See here for details:

http://lincoln.ac.uk/home/fm/abouttheschool/

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD

Students on this course currently have free access to Adobe Creative Cloud software for the duration of their studies.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

During the second year, there are opportunities to take part in exchange programmes with one of our partner universities in Europe or the USA. Costs relating to the USA exchange programme can be found in the fees tab. Further information relating to exchanges within Europe can be found here:

http://lincoln.ac.uk/home/studywithus/internationalstudents/shortstudyopportunities/erasmusforstudents/

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

There are no mandatory additional activities, which will incur a cost on this course.

Project costs can vary depending on the nature of the practical work chosen by the student. Students are asked to consider costs when proposing a project. There are funds currently available within the School to students at all levels to provide support with such projects.

Study abroad outside of Europe

Exchange students applying to study outside of Europe do not pay tuition fees at their host university.

Participants will usually be responsible for all other costs themselves, including travel, accommodation, visas, insurance, vaccinations and administrative fees at the host institution.

Students going on exchange keep their entitlement to UK sources of funding such as student loans and should apply to their awarding body in the normal way, indicating that they will be studying abroad.

If your time away is a mandatory part of your degree programme, you may be entitled to extra funding. You should ask your funding body about this.

You may also be able to apply to your LEA or the SAAS for further funding to assist with travel expenses - contact them to enquire.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

EU and International students whose first language is not English will require English Language IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Unconditional Offer Scheme

The University of Lincoln Unconditional Offer Scheme has been created to identify outstanding undergraduate applicants who we think would excel at Lincoln and make a significant contribution to our academic community.

The University of Lincoln takes a holistic contextual view, looking at students in the round, including all the information supplied in their application and any additional relevant assessment required, such as a portfolio, or interview. The qualities required for success are therefore not exclusively academic, and students’ drive, ambition, creativity, and potential are important factors in those considered for the scheme.

Applicants selected for the scheme, who commit to the University of Lincoln as their first choice of university, will receive an unconditional offer. We expect students in receipt of an unconditional offer to continue to apply themselves in their studies, both at school and when they join our academic community here at Lincoln. In previous years students who were selected and joined through the Lincoln unconditional offer scheme have shown very good success rate in their studies.

Find out more about the Unconditional Offer Scheme

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.


Your Future Career

Graduates have gone on to careers in media, education, journalism and the arts and progressed to postgraduate study at Lincoln and elsewhere.

Work Experience

There are work experience opportunities through both the University's career service and our social enterprise New Media Lincs, some of which are paid.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

Graduates may go on to employment in teaching - via postgraduate study - in higher education, as well as in exhibition and curation, media journalism, marketing and PR, media management, and a variety of production-related roles in film, TV and the creative industries.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.


Facilities

Students are based in the Media, Humanities and Technology building in the heart of the University campus. Lectures and screenings are held in teaching spaces with high end projection equipment, such as the Stephen Langton Theatre. Practical work is undertaken in our award-winning Media and Broadcast Production Centre, a specialist production environment with television studios, video and audio editing suites, digital imaging, design and multimedia suites.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

As a student at Lincoln we know you will want an excellently resourced, comfortable and well-designed library. We offer this in the stunning Great Central Warehouse Library, with resources including more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library is open 24/7 for the majority of the academic year.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.