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This course is run by the National Centre for Food Manufacturing at their Holbeach Campus.

2.5 Years National Centre for Food Manufacturing Holbeach Campus [B] Validated 2.5 Years National Centre for Food Manufacturing Holbeach Campus [B] Validated

Flexible Learning

This degree offers part-time and distance learning, enabling you to study alongside your work and family commitments.

Invest in your Future

Invest in your future with a Foundation or Bachelors Degree in Food Manufacturing.


The National Centre for Food Manufacturing (NCFM) in south Lincolnshire is an outstanding resource for national and international food businesses. The Centre is the UK’s only specialist provider of part-time and flexible courses in Technical and Operations Management in the food industry.


Read more in our flyer - NCFM [PDF] or view online.

Introduction

Shaped by major food industry employers, the Food Manufacture (Operations Management) degree aims to prepare students for key operational roles within the sector, where there is demand for highly skilled managers.

This course can be studied at Foundation (FdSc) or Bachelor’s (BSc) level http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/fdsopmub

Both courses are offered on a part-time basis and are run predominantly through distance learning. Students typically complete the Foundation course in two and a half years and have the option to enrol on level three of the Bachelor’s degree, following a short bridging course, to pursue more in-depth study for an additional two years. Direct enrolment on to the Bachelor’s degree is available for students who meet the entry requirements.

The course is designed to provide specialist knowledge of food factory processing and automation, management, quality assurance and new process development, offering students the opportunity to develop a strategic overview of the industry. It focuses on the science and management of the local, regional and global food supply chain and considers the impact of economic and environmental drivers on food markets, while aiming to develop key skills in leadership, critical analysis and creative thinking.

Applications should be made direct to the University using the part-time application at: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/apply

How You Study

The foundation degree aims to provide flexibility of access for people who need to combine studying with employment.

The foundation degree is a vocational programme that is taught by supported distance learning, day release from your employer or, if required, a combination of both. The supported distance learning mode of study requires that you attend a one week residential block per year at the campus to undertake the practical and tutorial elements of the course. There is some flexibility, but it is expected that the normal duration for completion of the programme is approximately two and a half years.

Level one aims to introduce planning and forecasting, managing people, quality assurance and food safety. Students have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the principles of factory design, food science and microbiology, and technology. At level two, students may learn about the processes of food engineering, preservation and packaging.

If students choose to progress to the Bachelor’s course, they have the opportunity to study advanced modules on nutrition and process development, while completing an individual project on a topic of direct relevance to their employment.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of your degree. However, remember that you are engaging in a full-time degree; so, at the very least, you should expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time and you may undertake assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Are Assessed

The emphasis that the foundation degree places on work-based learning is designed to fit into the busy and ever changing environment of the food factory. The delivery routes of the programme (day release/distance learning/combination) aims to give increased flexibility to the student in a busy industry.

All students on all routes attend an induction to the programme at or as near to enrolment as possible.

All units on the day release programme are taught through lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical/laboratory based sessions. Individual units also have an element of food manufacturing site visits and seminars led by food industry experts.

The supported distance learning units are taught through work booklets, electronic materials and personal tutorials by individual lecturers. Students are required to attend one study week per year of the programme.

Units are assessed through the means of written scientific reports, written projects, group presentations and examinations. The type of assessment depends on the subject matter of the unit.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Methods of Assessment

The way you will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our National Centre for Food Manufacturing Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2016-17

Applicatants must hold a minimum of 180 UCAS points, either from A Levels, an Advanced Modern Apprenticeship or BTEC National Certificate in Food Manufacturing (or a related subject)

Vocational and professional qualifications will also be considered. Ideally, candidates will have been employed in a managerial or supervisory role in the food manufacture or related industry.

This course also require applicants to possess three GCSEs at grade C or above, including maths, English language and science.

We also accept a wide range of other qualifications including the BTEC Extended Diploma, Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma, the European and International Baccalaureate Diplomas, and Advanced Diplomas. You can find tariff values on the UCAS website http://lncn.eu/cdez

This programme has an HE credit rating of 240 points, and also offers the option of gaining an HNC at the equivalent of 168 credit points.

Level 1

Food Quality Assurance and Safety

Quality assurance plays an important legal and moral role within food production for both the processor and producer. This module aims to develop students' understanding of available quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) management methods whilst adhering to legislation and industry codes of practice. The rationale of HACCP and the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM) can be explored together with schemes used to monitor management systems.

Forecasting and Planning for Businesses

In this module students have the opportunity to explore the reasons for, and methods of, forecasting. The impact of inaccurate forecasting on the ability to, and cost of, supply can also be explored in this module, along with the potential financial benefit of an accurate forecasting system. Students have the opportunity to examine the commercial relationship between supplier and customer, and have the chance to build a model to enable them to accurately predict the impact of sales fluctuations on a business. Seasonality and promotional activity have a massive impact on market demand; the role of forecasting in satisfying that demand at a minimum cost is vital and will form a large portion of work in this module.

Managing People

This module is designed to introduce students to the basic people management techniques required in the food industry. It encourages students to reflect on their role, and the skills, knowledge required to ensure the best possible results at work. The module aims to develop self-management and work planning skills in individuals who are in positions of responsibility in the food industry, and focuses on taking responsibility for personal development to enable them to manage effectively. It also aims to identify strategies to improve team performance.

Policies and Markets

This module encourages students to appreciate the overarching role played by international agreements on trade, in the production of food on any scale in the UK. Students have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the global perspectives and political dimensions which impact on food production in the UK. The aim is to more easily assess the direction of the business and how to comply with legislation and directives, as well as consumer influence. The module also reviews the impact of new technologies on food production, and provides students with the opportunity to examine how currency and exchange rate fluctuations can affect the market and business opportunities.

Principles of Food Factory Design

Seeking to cover the design of food manufacturing buildings, students have the opportunity to explore hygienic segregation, drainage systems, floor and wall constructions, air conditioning and air flow, as well as the routing of services and work in progress. Constraints on the design process, such as meeting all stakeholder needs, capacity, cost and product quality, are designed to form the background to the development of a multi-stage process. Automation is also discussed as a way of improving profitability.

Principles of Food Science and Microbiology

This module aims to provide students with the background knowledge to the chemistry and microbiology of foodstuffs. Students have the opportunity to explore the basic chemical structures of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, and can be introduced to laboratory safety and the codes of practice relevant to the practical work they undertake. Students have the opportunity to learn about the chemical and biological changes which occur during the processing and storage of food materials. This module reviews the nature, range and growth patterns of specific micro-organisms within foods, the spoilage patterns and pathogens associated with food commodities, and seeks to develop the basic practical skills required in microbiological analysis to include aseptic technique, media, enumeration and identification of food micro flora.

Principles of Food Technology

This module aims to equip students with an understanding of the principles of food technology. This module gives students the opportunity to appreciate the breadth and complexity of the modern food industry. The emphasis is on understanding processing and preservation technologies.

Level 2

Food Process Engineering

This module gives students the opportunity to develop their knowledge of basic food processing techniques via a detailed study of food processing machinery design. The module will seek to assess hygienic design and fitness of use, to reveal the principles of machinery design, and review the linking of different food processes to examine issue surrounding process lines. Students have the opportunity to explore process control technology, and the implications of poor process control systems and an overview of the engineering support requirements of a modern food processing company.

Food Process, Preservation and Packaging

This module gives students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the major food processing and preservation methods. The technological aspects of food manufacture will centre on the precise description of a process in a specification. The module also focuses on evaluating the food process in terms of its safety to the consumer, and the effects on the food flavours, colours and textures. Packaging systems can also be studied with respect to their contribution to the growth of the food manufacturing industry along with the application of check-weighing and metal detection technologies in a modern food production operation.

Health and Diet

This module aims to provide background knowledge to the fundamental aspects of food, health and nutrition. Students are given the opportunity to develop an understanding of health related problems associated with diet and the increasing use of functional foods in food manufacturing.

Managing People in Food Organisations

This module aims to develop self-management and work planning skills for those in positions of responsibility. It focuses on taking responsibility for personal development with the aim of enabling students to manage effectively and identifies strategies to develop the skills and knowledge of teams to ensure the best possible results at work.

Methods in Business Improvement

This module aims to help students study, develop and apply Business Improvement Techniques. Simulations are used and by the end of the module it is envisaged that the improvement tools that students will have had the opportunity to develop will also be applied to real business situations.

New Process Development

This module aims to introduce students to the concept of process development and its role and application within the food industry. The module seeks to reinforce the importance of process development and confirm the interrelationship with other departments and processes involved in product manufacture. This module focuses on practical assessment and seeks to develop skills in the sensory evaluation of food qualities on relation to food process development.

Work Based Project - Process and Business Improvement

This project is an individual investigation into a specific topic, usually of direct relevance to a student's own employment and operations management. Research for this project will normally be undertaken at a place of work, under the supervision of both an employer mentor and an academic tutor. The nature and parameters of the project are expected to be identified through negotiation with employers. The project aims to develop skills in independent learning through research, evaluation, and presenting information, as well as to foster communication between the student, employer and project tutor. Students are expected to use statistical and analytical skills to interpret primary data.

The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Research

Academics have in-depth experience in food science and technology research, including in food manufacturing systems (lean manufacturing, packaging and automation), food process engineering and food quality and safety systems.

Flexible Learning

This degree offers part-time and distance learning, enabling you to study alongside your work and family commitments.

Placements

Placement Year

When you are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, you will be required to cover your own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

The National Centre for Food Manufacturing is based in Holbeach, South Lincolnshire. This hub of food manufacturing technology has specialist facilities and industry-standard equipment, including analytical laboratories with gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, a test kitchen and sensory testing suite, a technician training centre and a processing facility with robotic case packing and fresh food lines.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever your area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which you may need in your future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

This course aims to consolidate and develop your career in many aspects of food processing, including roles in supply management, operations and production management, planning and process engineering. Graduates are well placed to progress in this highly innovative and fast-moving industry, which currently has a shortage of employees with higher-level skills.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and your meals may be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional you will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay your own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

Shaped by major food industry employers, the Food Manufacture (Operations Management) degree aims to prepare students for key operational roles within the sector, where there is demand for highly skilled managers.
Developed in collaboration with employers in the food manufacturing industry, this degree aims to offer students the opportunity to develop expert knowledge in quality assurance, factory processes, product development and management specific to the food sector.
Developed in collaboration with employers in the food manufacturing industry, this course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop expert knowledge in quality assurance, factory processes, product development and management specific to the food sector.

Introduction

Shaped by major food industry employers, the Food Manufacture (Operations Management) degree aims to prepare students for key operational roles within the sector, where there is demand for highly skilled managers.

This course can be studied at Foundation (FdSc) or Bachelor’s (BSc) level http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/fdsopmub

Both courses are offered on a part-time basis and are run predominantly through distance learning. Students typically complete the Foundation course in two and a half years and have the option to enrol on level three of the Bachelor’s degree, following a short bridging course, to pursue more in-depth study for an additional two years. Direct enrolment on to the Bachelor’s degree is available for students who meet the entry requirements.

The course is designed to provide specialist knowledge of food factory processing and automation, management, quality assurance and new process development, offering students the opportunity to develop a strategic overview of the industry. It focuses on the science and management of the local, regional and global food supply chain and considers the impact of economic and environmental drivers on food markets, while aiming to develop key skills in leadership, critical analysis and creative thinking.

Applications should be made direct to the University using the part-time application at: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/apply

How You Study

The foundation degree aims to provide flexibility of access for people who need to combine studying with employment.

The foundation degree is a vocational programme that is taught by supported distance learning, day release from your employer or, if required, a combination of both. The supported distance learning mode of study requires that you attend a one week residential block per year at the campus to undertake the practical and tutorial elements of the course. There is some flexibility, but it is expected that the normal duration for completion of the programme is approximately two and a half years.

Level one aims to introduce planning and forecasting, managing people, quality assurance and food safety. Students have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the principles of factory design, food science and microbiology, and technology. At level two, students may learn about the processes of food engineering, preservation and packaging.

If students choose to progress to the Bachelor’s course, they have the opportunity to study advanced modules on nutrition and process development, while completing an individual project on a topic of direct relevance to their employment.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of your degree. However, remember that you are engaging in a full-time degree; so, at the very least, you should expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time and you may undertake assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Are Assessed

The emphasis that the foundation degree places on work-based learning is designed to fit into the busy and ever changing environment of the food factory. The delivery routes of the programme (day release/distance learning/combination) aims to give increased flexibility to the student in a busy industry.

All students on all routes attend an induction to the programme at or as near to enrolment as possible.

All units on the day release programme are taught through lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical/laboratory based sessions. Individual units also have an element of food manufacturing site visits and seminars led by food industry experts.

The supported distance learning units are taught through work booklets, electronic materials and personal tutorials by individual lecturers. Students are required to attend one study week per year of the programme.

Units are assessed through the means of written scientific reports, written projects, group presentations and examinations. The type of assessment depends on the subject matter of the unit.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above).

Methods of Assessment

The way you will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our National Centre for Food Manufacturing Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

Applicatants must hold a minimum of 180 UCAS points, either from A Levels, an Advanced Modern Apprenticeship or BTEC National Certificate in Food Manufacturing (or a related subject)

Vocational and professional qualifications will also be considered. Ideally, candidates will have been employed in a managerial or supervisory role in the food manufacture or related industry.

This course also require applicants to possess three GCSEs at grade C or above, including maths, English language and science.

We also accept a wide range of other qualifications including the BTEC Extended Diploma, Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma, the European and International Baccalaureate Diplomas, and Advanced Diplomas. You can find tariff values on the UCAS website http://lncn.eu/cdez

This programme has an HE credit rating of 240 points, and also offers the option of gaining an HNC at the equivalent of 168 credit points.

Level 1

Food Quality Assurance and Safety

Quality assurance plays an important legal and moral role within food production for both the processor and producer. This module aims to develop students' understanding of available quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) management methods whilst adhering to legislation and industry codes of practice. The rationale of HACCP and the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM) can be explored together with schemes used to monitor management systems.

Forecasting and Planning for Businesses

In this module students have the opportunity to explore the reasons for, and methods of, forecasting. The impact of inaccurate forecasting on the ability to, and cost of, supply can also be explored in this module, along with the potential financial benefit of an accurate forecasting system. Students have the opportunity to examine the commercial relationship between supplier and customer, and have the chance to build a model to enable them to accurately predict the impact of sales fluctuations on a business. Seasonality and promotional activity have a massive impact on market demand; the role of forecasting in satisfying that demand at a minimum cost is vital and will form a large portion of work in this module.

Managing People

This module is designed to introduce students to the basic people management techniques required in the food industry. It encourages students to reflect on their role, and the skills, knowledge required to ensure the best possible results at work. The module aims to develop self-management and work planning skills in individuals who are in positions of responsibility in the food industry, and focuses on taking responsibility for personal development to enable them to manage effectively. It also aims to identify strategies to improve team performance.

Policies and Markets

This module encourages students to appreciate the overarching role played by international agreements on trade, in the production of food on any scale in the UK. Students have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the global perspectives and political dimensions which impact on food production in the UK. The aim is to more easily assess the direction of the business and how to comply with legislation and directives, as well as consumer influence. The module also reviews the impact of new technologies on food production, and provides students with the opportunity to examine how currency and exchange rate fluctuations can affect the market and business opportunities.

Principles of Food Factory Design

Seeking to cover the design of food manufacturing buildings, students have the opportunity to explore hygienic segregation, drainage systems, floor and wall constructions, air conditioning and air flow, as well as the routing of services and work in progress. Constraints on the design process, such as meeting all stakeholder needs, capacity, cost and product quality, are designed to form the background to the development of a multi-stage process. Automation is also discussed as a way of improving profitability.

Principles of Food Science and Microbiology

This module aims to provide students with the background knowledge to the chemistry and microbiology of foodstuffs. Students have the opportunity to explore the basic chemical structures of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, and can be introduced to laboratory safety and the codes of practice relevant to the practical work they undertake.

Students have the opportunity to learn about the chemical and biological changes which occur during the processing and storage of food materials. This module reviews the nature, range and growth patterns of specific micro-organisms within foods, the spoilage patterns and pathogens associated with food commodities, and seeks to develop the basic practical skills required in microbiological analysis to include aseptic technique, media, enumeration and identification of food micro flora.

Principles of Food Technology

This module aims to equip students with an understanding of the principles of food technology. This module gives students the opportunity to appreciate the breadth and complexity of the modern food industry. The emphasis is on understanding processing and preservation technologies.

Level 2

Food Process Engineering

This module gives students the opportunity to develop their knowledge of basic food processing techniques via a detailed study of food processing machinery design. The module will seek to assess hygienic design and fitness of use, to reveal the principles of machinery design, and review the linking of different food processes to examine issue surrounding process lines. Students have the opportunity to explore process control technology, and the implications of poor process control systems and an overview of the engineering support requirements of a modern food processing company.

Food Process, Preservation and Packaging

Students are given the opportunity to develop an understanding of the major food processing and preservation methods. The technological aspects of food manufacture will centre on the precise description of a process in a specification. The module also focuses on evaluating the food process in terms of its safety to the consumer, and the effects on the food flavours, colours and textures. Packaging systems can also be studied with respect to their contribution to the growth of the food manufacturing industry along with the application of check-weighing and metal detection technologies in a modern food production operation.

Health and Diet

This module aims to provide background knowledge to the fundamental aspects of food, health and nutrition. Students are given the opportunity to develop an understanding of health related problems associated with diet and the increasing use of functional foods in food manufacturing.

Managing People in Food Organisations

This module aims to develop self-management and work planning skills for those in positions of responsibility. It focuses on taking responsibility for personal development with the aim of enabling students to manage effectively and identifies strategies to develop the skills and knowledge of teams to ensure the best possible results at work.

Methods in Business Improvement

This module aims to help students study, develop and apply Business Improvement Techniques. Simulations are used and by the end of the module it is envisaged that the improvement tools that students will have had the opportunity to develop will also be applied to real business situations.

New Process Development

This project is an individual investigation into a specific topic, usually of direct relevance to a student's own employment and operations management. Research for this project will normally be undertaken at a place of work, under the supervision of both an employer mentor and an academic tutor. The nature and parameters of the project are expected to be identified through negotiation with employers. The project aims to develop skills in independent learning through research, evaluation, and presenting information, as well as to foster communication between the student, employer and project tutor. Students are expected to use statistical and analytical skills to interpret primary data.

Work Based Project - Process and Business Improvement

This project is an individual investigation into a specific topic, usually of direct relevance to a student's own employment and operations management. Research for this project will normally be undertaken at a place of work, under the supervision of both an employer mentor and an academic tutor.

The nature and parameters of the project will be identified through negotiation with employers. The project aims to develop skills in independent learning through research, evaluation, and presenting information, as well as to foster communication between the student, employer and project tutor. Students are expected to use statistical and analytical skills to interpret primary data.

The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Research

Academics have in-depth experience in food science and technology research, including in food manufacturing systems (lean manufacturing, packaging and automation), food process engineering and food quality and safety systems.

Flexible Learning

This degree offers part-time and distance learning, enabling you to study alongside your work and family commitments.

Placements

Placement Year

When you are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, you will be required to cover your own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

The National Centre for Food Manufacturing is based in Holbeach, South Lincolnshire. This hub of food manufacturing technology has specialist facilities and industry-standard equipment, including analytical laboratories with gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, a test kitchen and sensory testing suite, a technician training centre and a processing facility with robotic case packing and fresh food lines.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever your area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which you may need in your future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

This course aims to consolidate and develop your career in many aspects of food processing, including roles in supply management, operations and production management, planning and process engineering. Graduates are well placed to progress in this highly innovative and fast-moving industry, which currently has a shortage of employees with higher-level skills.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course. Some courses provide opportunities for you to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and your meals may be covered by the University and so is included in your fee. Where these are optional you will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay your own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

Shaped by major food industry employers, the Food Manufacture (Operations Management) degree aims to prepare students for key operational roles within the sector, where there is demand for highly skilled managers.
Developed in collaboration with employers in the food manufacturing industry, this degree aims to offer students the opportunity to develop expert knowledge in quality assurance, factory processes, product development and management specific to the food sector.
Developed in collaboration with employers in the food manufacturing industry, this course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop expert knowledge in quality assurance, factory processes, product development and management specific to the food sector.

Tuition Fees

For Home/EU students

Foundation Degree in Food Manufacturing (Duration 2½ Years)

 

September 2015

January 2016

 

Modules

Credits

Cost

Modules

Credits

Cost

Year 1

7

105

£4,120

4

60

£2,060

Year 2

7

105

£4,120

7

105

£4,120

Year 3

2

30

£2,060

5

75

£4,120

Total

16

240

£10,300

16

240

£10,300

Individual modules  

Students wishing to access individual modules in any year of the programme will be charged £TBA per 15-credit module.

 

 For International fees, please contact the HE Administrator on HEAdminNCFM@lincoln.ac.uk

For further information about fees, loans and discounts, please see our Fees & Funding guide

For further information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions]