Course Information

BA (Hons)

BA (Hons)

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Fashion

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3 years School of Fine and Performing Arts Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (or equivalent qualifications) W230 3 years School of Fine and Performing Arts Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BCC (104 UCAS Tariff points) (or equivalent qualifications) W230

Introduction

The BA (Hons) Fashion degree is a highly-creative course that aims to promote innovation in all aspects of student work. The breadth of the creative experience provides students with the opportunity to both challenge and inspire contemporary fashion.

This course is aimed at applicants interested in an experimental, art-based degree in fashion. Course content has been designed to stimulate innovation through conceptual design, fashion illustration, creative pattern drafting, garment development, millinery, costume design, collaboration and performance.

Theory underpins this course, which aims to provide opportunities for students to develop critical-thinking skills and a knowledge of fashion, culture and the arts. Students have the opportunity to gain valuable experience through live projects, competitions and work placements, which may enhance graduate employability.

How You Study

In the first year, students have the opportunity to develop key Fashion Making skills in 'Fashion Elements: Design, Construction and Cut'.

In the second year, the course aims to develop these skills through the 'Fashion Architecture', 'Fashion Reconstruction' and 'Advanced Millinery' modules, in which students can begin to specialise in Millinery or a broader Fashion practice.

In the third year, the practical work is synthesised with other modules, offering interdisciplinary, live projects and industry-focused working in the module 'Professional Profile'.

Critical thinking is a fundamental aspect of the course from Level 1, where students have the opportunity to learn basic academic skills alongside a scholarly study of Fashion in 'Reading Fashion'.

At level 2 students have the chance to incorporate critical thinking in 'Fashion Architecture' and in Level 3, the critical work continues with the 'Dissertation' and 'Research Project'. All of these modules involve academic research, critical practice and elements of essay writing.

Reflective practice is encouraged within all modules and is designed to play a key role in developing intelligent and highly creative fashion thinkers, innovators and creators.

Increasingly as the programme develops, students will have the opportunity to benefit from working alongside students from other programmes. This will be through shared modules that co-exist on the BA (Hons) Drama or BA (Hons) Music degrees, or through engaging with modules that contribute to the collaborative ethos of the school.

For example, the Level 2 module 'Fashion and Performance' runs in conjunction with the Level 2 Drama module 'Shakespeare and Performance' and the level 3 Music module 'Music and the Stage', providing Fashion students with the opportunity to design and produce costumes for the Shakespeare productions performed by Drama students.

However, as the programme develops the 'Fashion and Performance' module could expand to include collaboration with other performance-based modules.

This degree aims to provide Fashion students with the opportunity to develop the experience and expertise to organise and produce their own showcase, contributing to their employability.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Are Assessed

Students will experience a variety of module assessment modes which include portfolio work, essays, presentations, production of millinery, garments, fashion collections and costume, in addition to blogs, sketch-books and journals. Students will have the chance for their work to be assessed in an on campus fashion show at level 3.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Interviews & Applicant Days

Successful applicants will be invited to attend an interview in which fashion tutors will review their portfolio. The interview process is an opportunity to discuss work and personal fashion interests with staff, in addition to asking any questions that you may have about the programme.

Advisory portfolio surgeries, taster sessions and tours are available on request. Please contact the Programme Leader.

What We Look For In Your Application

We are looking for highly creative and ambitious applicants from a variety of art and design backgrounds. Personal portfolios should communicate individual styles of working and experimental fashion interests, and include evidence of an ability to draw, design, observe, make, translate and explore ideas in interesting ways. Sketchbooks and garments should be included in the work brought to interview.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of Fine and Performing Arts Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC, including grade B from an A Level art, design or media studies related subject.

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall, with 5 at Higher Level from an art, design or media studies related subject.

BTEC Extended Diploma in an art, design or media related subject: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma in an art, design or media related subject: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required.

Applicants should also have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above, including English Language, or the equivalent.

Applicants will need to complete a successful interview.

Mature students with extensive work experience and a portfolio of work, will be selected on individual merit. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Fashion Elements: Design, Construction and Cut (Core)

This core module will aim to introduce students to the range of practical, theoretical and contextual approaches to fashion. Students will have the opportunity to learn manufacture and pattern cutting techniques necessary to successfully develop innovative 3D responses to fashion design briefs, working both on the stand and from 2D to 3D. Encouraging independent research and development of personal design processes, students may explore, experiment and consider a range of materials appropriate for different audiences and purposes.

Fashion, Culture & Context (Core)

This module introduces students to the contextual study of fashion and culture, from both historic and contemporary perspectives.

Academic skills form an integral part of student learning, facilitating the development, exploration and articulation of ideas, in line with the standards required at degree level.

Module activities are designed to engage students in the effective use of; research, analysis, independent critical thinking, synthesis and communication, within both their academic and creative practice.

Millinery (Core)

This core module aims to introduce students to a range of practical, theoretical and contextual approaches to millinery. Throughout the module, students can learn a range of construction and production techniques, encouraging the exploration and potential of a range of materials to realise future designs for different purposes and audiences. It will encourage independent research in respect to the relationship between design and construction while developing the student's own design aesthetic as a milliner.

Reading Fashion (Core)

This core module aims to introduce students to a range of theoretical approaches to fashion through practice. Week by week, as each theoretical topic is introduced and addressed, students can develop a range of critical, creative, visual and verbal responses, through which they will challenge their understanding of fashion.

Topics include: What is Fashion?, Fashion and Gender, Fashion and the Avant-Garde, and Fashion and Identity.

Visual Communication (Core)

This core module gives students the opportunity to research methodologies and practices relevant to the study of fashion, from initial concepts through to the generation of final designs. Students can learn to formulate and adapt their creative response to a range of briefs, encouraging an independent approach to the exploration of design processes, techniques, identity and meaning, inherent to the formation of fashion ideas and the development of a personal design aesthetic.

The purpose of this module is to develop the students’ understanding of fashion careers and employability through project work, seminars and in class discussion. Students will be introduced to the professional design process and working practices relevant to the fashion industry.

Level 2

Advanced Millinery (Option)

This elective module aims to develop students' understanding of traditional and contemporary practices in millinery at an advanced level. It explores traditional skills of couture craftsmanship together with contemporary technologies, materials and design practices. It encourages creative and innovative work, aiming to equip students with an advanced technical knowledge of specialist skills and techniques required to communicate and translate their ideas into headwear for different purposes and audiences.

Beyond Fashion (Option)

This elective module explores how fashion has had, and continues to have, an impact on other discipline areas and how it is positioned in terms of a wider cultural context. Students can examine how fashion is explored through media such as film, live-art, dance and performance. Areas of study include fashion and film, fashion and the art industry, and fashion and dance.

Fashion and Performance (Core)

This core module brings together students from Fashion, Drama, Dance and Music to form a performance production team. A key element of this module requires Fashion students to be responsible for the costume for a particular production. Depending on which production is produced, areas of study can include: costume and performance, artistic vision, costume and movement, costume and period, design and experimentation, sourcing costumes, and working with performers, musicians and directors.

Fashion Architecture (Core)

This core module introduces students to historical and contemporary understanding of the changing silhouette within fashion. Looking at traditional methods of construction, cut and materials which have been used to exaggerate the body through padding, ruffs, bustles and cages, to the restriction and constraint seen within corsetry. Students may consider how these shapes interact with the wearer and can change and distort the body.

This is a studio practice-based module where students have the opportunity to develop creative approaches to pattern cutting and exploring how shape, form and volume can be created and developed within design and pattern. Students can explore and examine materials and techniques found within traditional and contemporary tailoring and corsetry disciplines and apply them to their own practice.

Fashion Reconstruction (Option)

This elective module encourages students to research a historical period between 1560-1935 and remake a period costume using appropriate materials and construction processes.

Students explore historical methods of pattern drafting, construction and decorative techniques alongside traditional materials appropriate to their chosen period. Developing research skills using both primary and secondary sources, students can look at how to study an object to identify its materials, cut and construction, and place it within historical context, exploring the way people wore clothing in the past. This body of research will be developed within the students own design practice.

Placements (Fine & Performing Arts) (Option)

On completion of their degree, students need to be able to decide how best to employ the skills that they have gained. As well as the more obvious routes within a performing arts degree such as teaching, students need to be aware of what other options may be open to them practically, to explore their route out of the University and on into appropriate employment.

This module encourages students to think beyond the confines of the University, reaching into the wider community to hone their skills for future employment. This module should enable students to examine closely how various arts based organisations work from day to day, whilst at the same time relating that experience to their studies.

Visual Identity (Core)

This core module identifies and develops the individual design aesthetic of students through the formulation, communication and presentation of a range of innovative fashion responses. Students elect to develop either a digital and/or traditional portfolio to a professional standard in readiness for work placement and interview.

Engagement with the contemporary fashion and related creative industries forms an important part of this course, enabling students to define their career aspirations, portfolio and marketing strategy, all of which will be presented to staff and peers for feedback on conclusion of the module. Interdisciplinary practice with other creative areas is encouraged, resulting in a broader approach to design and communication in the context of fashion.

Visual Identity prepares students for the year three Professional Profile module.

Level 3

Dissertation (Fine & Performing Arts) (Core)

The Dissertation provides the opportunity for a student to investigate and pursue a fine and performing arts based topic of his or her own choosing, and in more depth than is normally possible in a conventional essay.

Each student will be offered mentorship, though the emphasis will fall on independent learning. Students will be expected to work on their own initiative and to provide clear evidence of their ability to collect, select and evaluate relevant information, which can subsequently be presented in a clear and logical manner, in the form of a 9000 word dissertation.

Professional Profile (Core)

This core module gives final-year students the opportunity to develop an individual approach for the presentation of their final degree work. Students can work with subject and industry experts to negotiate and formulate a feasible platform through which they will externally promote their work, personal talents and creative identity. Cross-disciplinary practice is encouraged and students will be expected to collaborate with external bodies in order to successfully achieve their desired outcome.

Professional practice, through the creation, planning, management and production of the final project, will demonstrate enterprise and employability skills aligned to the creative industries. Employability will be further enhanced through a pitch and a marketing profile, potentially preparing the graduate for a breadth of career options. The final marketing ‘vehicle’ will be presented to a panel of assessors comprising of academic staff and an industry expert/s.

Research Project - Professional and Creative Conclusion - Millinery (Option)

This module concludes students' design journey and results in the final production of a body of work for exhibition. The work should demonstrate a depth of understanding combined with conceptual, aesthetic and technical skills, and creative innovation. Students may form part of a community of designers who envisage new ways of making innovative and commercially-relevant work. The skills that students are expected to acquire could prepare them for future opportunities in the fashion industry and other creative sectors such as film, theatre and textile heritage arts, as well as preparation for running their own fashion-based business.

Students have the opportunity to emerge from this module with a collection of millinery with a supporting portfolio demonstrating creative and technical ability and individual design aesthetic.

Research Project - Professional and Creative Conclusion- Fashion (Option)

This module concludes students' design journey and results in the final production of a body of work for exhibition. The work should demonstrate a depth of understanding combined with conceptual, aesthetic and technical skills, and creative innovation. Students may form part of a community of designers who envisage new ways of making innovative and commercially-relevant work. The skills that students are expected to acquire could prepare them for future opportunities in the fashion industry and other creative sectors such as film, theatre and textile heritage arts, as well as preparation for running their own fashion-based business.

Students will have the opportunity to emerge from this module with a collection of garments with supporting portfolio demonstrating creative and technical ability and individual design aesthetic.

Research Project - Professional and Creative Development - Fashion (Option)

This elective module aims to provide students with design practice-led research skills, entrepreneurial and creative thinking skills and knowledge, and interdisciplinary approaches to fashion design. This can enable students to confidently communicate their design ideas and define their individual identity as a designer.

Students will have the opportunity to explore their fashion interests with an emphasis on design, illustration, market and technical abilities, through which research will determine their design criteria and audience for their creative outcome. Students can establish a rationale, source and plan to actualise their final project.

Innovation of ideas will infuse all aspects of this module, with an emphasis on traditional and new technologies in fabrics and construction, and engaging with the narrative of fashion.

Research Project - Professional and Creative Development - Millinery (Option)

This elective module provides students the opportunity to develop design practice-led research skills, entrepreneurial and creative thinking skills and knowledge, and interdisciplinary approaches to fashion design. This can enable students to confidently communicate their design ideas and define their individual identity as a designer.

Students have the opportunity to explore their millinery interests with an emphasis on design, illustration, market and technical abilities, through which research will determine their design criteria and audience for their creative outcome. Students may establish a rationale, source and plan to actualise their final project.

Innovation of ideas will infuse all aspects of this module with an emphasis on traditional and new technologies in fabrics and construction, and engaging with the narrative of millinery.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Industry Links

As part of the programme, students will have the opportunity to engage with experts from fashion and the creative industries throughout their degree. The format of this professional interaction varies, with recent on campus visits undertaking live projects, specialist workshops and guest lectures. The aim is to broaden creative versatility, professional approaches and industry knowledge.

Recent experts include:

  • Frankfurt based fine artists Battenberg Cartwright
  • India Usher from the British Fashion Council and an Alumni of the course
  • Matt Kinley, an Award winning West End theatre designer
  • Nottinghamshire based Latex Fashion and Costume expert Heath Clarke
  • Top fashion show DJ/music producer ‘Joshyouare’ (Joshua Craig), whose work includes Gareth Pugh and Erdem fashion show music
  • Dominic Parczuk, Artist in Residence at Lincoln Cathedral.

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD

Students on this course will receive a licence for Adobe Creative Cloud free of charge.

Placements

Tutors aim to offer guidance and advice on suitable placement and internship opportunities, which students are encouraged to regularly engage in, even if they opt to not take the ‘Placements’ module in year 2. It is usual for longer internships to take place over the vacation periods to fit in with the academic calendar. Costs relating to placements can be found in the Features tab.

Students also have the opportunity to participate in an annual student Internship Programme, which is a three to four week experience at the end of Semester B, during which time students apply to work with a third year of their choice, assisting them in the development and finalisation of their collection. Year 1 and 2 ‘interns’ can select their final year student depending on their own personal career goals.

Following on from this, students have the opportunity to gain further experience assisting with the production of the end of year fashion show. This eagerly awaited event is held in the Lincoln School of Fine and Performing Arts (LPAC) public theatre. The show aims to offer students a range of professional experience including; dressers, make up and hair styling, choreography, back stage organisation, front of house, marketing, set design and more.

Each new academic year can commence with the launch of a collaborative costume project. This project provides students with the opportunity to work in design teams to develop the costumes for the annual Christmas production, following a project briefing from the shows production team, writers and designers. Costume experience can be further developed in the ‘Fashion and Production’ module in Year 2.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

Fashion is located in the award-winning Art, Architecture and Design Building. The space offers design studios, technical spaces and machine rooms in addition to digital fabric printers, laser cutting and 3D print workshops. As part of the School of Fine and Performing Arts, students also benefit from on-site performance studios, a 450-capacity professional theatre and public gallery. These play host to student fashion shows and exhibitions, professionally supported by the in-house technical team.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

The nature of this degree aims to prepare graduates to work in a wide range of fashion and related areas, in particular the more creative roles; Fashion Design, Film & Theatre Costume, Styling, Trend Prediction, Millinery, Fashion Illustration and Show Production.


Lincoln graduate destinations have included:

  • Alexander McQueen
  • Anderson and Shepherd Tailors, Savile Row
  • Angels & Berman's Costumiers, London
  • Arcadia Group
  • BBC
  • The British Fashion Council
  • Burberry
  • Conde Nast
  • Dazed and Confused
  • Julien Macdonald
  • London Fashion Week
  • Matthew Williamson
  • Paul Smith
  • Roland Mouret
  • Royal Opera House
  • Stephen Jones Millinery.

Graduate Careers can include:

  • Costume Assistant
  • Fashion Blogger
  • Fashion Buyer
  • Fashion Consultant
  • Fashion Illustrator
  • Fashion Writer
  • Film, TV & Theatre Costume Designers
  • Freelance/Own Label
  • Menswear Designer
  • Military Costume Expert
  • Millinery Designer/Maker
  • Print Designer
  • Visual Merchandiser
  • Womens-wear Designer.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

Students should expect to incur on-going costs allied to the study of Fashion, including, but not limited to, the purchase of fabric, printing, art materials and cultural visits.

Visits are not assessed but are recommended as part of student development. It is usual to engage in three trips per academic year, at an average cost of £20-30 per student per event. An annual trip to a fashion centre is usually offered, with a typical three night Paris trip costing approximately £350-400 per student. This includes accommodation and travel costs, however food, inner city transport etc. are additional. Students are encouraged to pay for larger trips in instalments through the University’s Online Shop.

Year 1 and 2 students report typically spending £250-300 per year on course materials and equipment, in addition to £100 on printing. Final year expenditure can be greater due to the production of a collection and portfolio. It should be noted however that successful work is not dependent on high costs but on the level of originality, innovation, creativity and resourcefulness.

The University awards each student an annual £200 Materials Fund which assists with the provision of some key learning materials.

Related Courses

The practice-based curriculum on the BA (Hons) Dance degree at Lincoln reflects the vocational needs of professional dancers. Students will have the opportunity to engage with practical and theoretical methods to become stronger dancers and more dynamic dance makers. A variety of modules offers students the opportunity to develop a range of transferable skills in preparation for their future career. Dance training at Lincoln focuses on contemporary techniques and works to develop and nurture creative practice.
Our BA (Hons) Drama and Theatre degree puts the creativity of performance at centre stage and aims to prepare students for a range of careers in the theatre and media, both on and off stage.
The BA (Hons) Fine Art at Lincoln is designed to provide the expertise and environment to nurture students’ creative development and expression. They can learn from practising artists and arts professionals, and be introduced to a range of professional and transferable skills.
The BA (Hons) Product Design degree at the University of Lincoln has been developed with people’s needs at the fore, concentrating on the generation, delivery and communication of ideas that challenge conventional thinking and open up new markets.

Introduction

This highly creative course is ideal for those who wish to challenge and inspire contemporary fashion. Students have the freedom to experience and explore fashion, millinery, costume and fashion performance, as well as opportunities to work on collaborative projects.

The course aims to provide a supportive environment in which students can develop their critical thinking skills and a knowledge of fashion, culture and the arts. Live projects, competitions and work placements offer opportunities to gain valuable real-life experience that can enhance graduate employability.

How You Study

In year one, teaching places emphasis on creative and technical knowledge, introducing students to the core areas essential to 2D and 3D ideas development. Students have the opportunity to develop key fashion making skills in the core module 'Fashion Elements: Design, Construction and Cut'.

In year two, students are introduced to conceptual and innovative approaches to fashion, advanced techniques, collaborative projects, and professional presentation and work exhibition.

Skills can be further developed through the modules 'Fashion Architecture', 'Fashion Reconstruction' and 'Advanced Millinery', in which students can begin to specialise in Millinery or a broader Fashion practice.

Third-year teaching focuses on the identification and promotion of each student’s individual design aesthetic through the production of a final collection of work, a portfolio and a practice-led dissertation.

Critical thinking is a fundamental aspect of the course from level one, where students have the opportunity to learn basic academic skills alongside a academic study of Fashion in the 'Reading Fashion' module. At level two, students have the chance to incorporate critical thinking in the 'Fashion Architecture' module, and at level three, the critical work continues with the 'Dissertation' and 'Research Project' modules. All of these modules involve academic research, critical practice and elements of essay writing.

Reflective practice is encouraged within all modules and is designed to play a key role in developing intelligent and highly creative fashion thinkers, innovators and creators.

As the course develops, students have the opportunity to benefit from working alongside students from other programmes. This will be through shared modules that co-exist on the BA (Hons) Drama or BA (Hons) Music degrees, or through engaging with modules that contribute to the collaborative ethos of the school.

For example, the level two module 'Fashion and Performance' runs in conjunction with the level two Drama module 'Shakespeare and Performance' and the level three Music module 'Music and the Stage', providing Fashion students with the opportunity to design and produce costumes for the Shakespeare productions performed by Drama students. However, as the programme develops the 'Fashion and Performance' module could expand to include collaboration with other performance-based modules.

This degree aims to provide Fashion students with the opportunity to develop the experience and expertise to organise and produce their own showcase, contributing to their employability.

Contact Hours and Independent Study

Contact hours may vary for each year of a degree. When engaging in a full-time degree students should, at the very least, expect to undertake a minimum of 37 hours of study each week during term time (including independent study) in addition to potentially undertaking assignments outside of term time. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Please see the Unistats data, using the link at the bottom of this page, for specific information relating to this course in terms of course composition and delivery, contact hours and student satisfaction.

How You Are Assessed

Students will experience a variety of module assessment modes which include portfolio work, essays, presentations, production of millinery, garments, fashion collections and costume, in addition to blogs, sketch-books and journals. Students may have the opportunity to exhibit their work in an end of year degree/fashion show at level three.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students will be assessed on this course will vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

For a breakdown of assessment methods used on this course and student satisfaction, please visit the Unistats website, using the link at the bottom of this page.

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Interviews & Applicant Days

Successful applicants will be invited to attend an interview in which fashion tutors will review their portfolio. The interview process is an opportunity to discuss work and personal fashion interests with staff, in addition to asking any questions about the programme.

Advisory portfolio surgeries, taster sessions and tours are available on request. Please contact the Programme Leader.

What We Look For In Your Application

We are looking for highly creative and ambitious applicants from a variety of art and design backgrounds. Personal portfolios should communicate individual styles of working and experimental fashion interests, and include evidence of an ability to draw, design, observe, make, translate and explore ideas in interesting ways. Sketchbooks and garments should be included in the work brought to interview.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our School of Fine and Performing Arts Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC.

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall.

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma:: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above.

Applicants should also have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above, including English Language, or the equivalent.

Applicants will also need to complete a successful interview and produce a portfolio of work.

Mature students with extensive work experience and a portfolio of work, will be selected on individual merit. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Fashion Elements: Design, Construction and Cut (Core)

This core module will aim to introduce students to the range of practical, theoretical and contextual approaches to fashion. Students will have the opportunity to learn manufacture and pattern cutting techniques necessary to successfully develop innovative 3D responses to fashion design briefs, working both on the stand and from 2D to 3D. Encouraging independent research and development of personal design processes, students may explore, experiment and consider a range of materials appropriate for different audiences and purposes.

Fashion, Culture & Context (Core)

This module introduces students to the contextual study of fashion and culture, from both historic and contemporary perspectives.

Academic skills form an integral part of student learning, facilitating the development, exploration and articulation of ideas, in line with the standards required at degree level.

Module activities are designed to engage students in the effective use of; research, analysis, independent critical thinking, synthesis and communication, within both their academic and creative practice.

Millinery (Core)

This core module aims to introduce students to a range of practical, theoretical and contextual approaches to millinery. Throughout the module, students can learn a range of construction and production techniques, encouraging the exploration and potential of a range of materials to realise future designs for different purposes and audiences. It will encourage independent research in respect to the relationship between design and construction while developing the student's own design aesthetic as a milliner.

Reading Fashion (Core)

This core module aims to introduce students to a range of theoretical approaches to fashion through practice. Week by week, as each theoretical topic is introduced and addressed, students can develop a range of critical, creative, visual and verbal responses, through which they will challenge their understanding of fashion.

Topics include: What is Fashion? Fashion and Gender, Fashion and the Avant-Garde, and Fashion and Identity.

Visual Communication (Core)

This core module gives students the opportunity to research methodologies and practices relevant to the study of fashion, from initial concepts through to the generation of final designs. Students can learn to formulate and adapt their creative response to a range of briefs, encouraging an independent approach to the exploration of design processes, techniques, identity and meaning, inherent to the formation of fashion ideas and the development of a personal design aesthetic.

The purpose of this module is to develop the students’ understanding of fashion careers and employability through project work, seminars and in class discussion. Students will be introduced to the professional design process and working practices relevant to the fashion industry.

Level 2

Advanced Millinery (Option)

This elective module aims to develop students' understanding of traditional and contemporary practices in millinery at an advanced level. It explores traditional skills of couture craftsmanship together with contemporary technologies, materials and design practices. It encourages creative and innovative work, aiming to equip students with an advanced technical knowledge of specialist skills and techniques required to communicate and translate their ideas into headwear, for different purposes and audiences.

Beyond Fashion (Option)

This elective module explores how fashion has had, and continues to have, an impact on other discipline areas and how it is positioned in terms of a wider cultural context. Students can examine how fashion is explored through media such as film, live-art, dance and performance. Areas of study include fashion and film, fashion and the art industry, and fashion and dance.

Fashion and Performance (Core)

This core module brings together students from Fashion, Drama, Dance and Music to form a performance production team. A key element of this module requires Fashion students to be responsible for the costume for a particular production. Depending on which production is produced, areas of study can include: costume and performance, artistic vision, costume and movement, costume and period, design and experimentation, sourcing costumes, and working with performers, musicians and directors.

Fashion Architecture (Core)

This core module introduces students to historical and contemporary understanding of the changing silhouette within fashion. Looking at traditional methods of construction, cut and materials which have been used to exaggerate the body through padding, ruffs, bustles and cages, to the restriction and constraint seen within corsetry. Students may consider how these shapes interact with the wearer and can change and distort the body.

This is a studio practice-based module where students have the opportunity to develop creative approaches to pattern cutting and exploring how shape, form and volume can be created and developed within design and pattern. Students can explore and examine materials and techniques found within traditional and contemporary tailoring and corsetry disciplines and apply them to their own practice.

Fashion Reconstruction (Option)

This elective module encourages students to research a historical period between 1560-1935 and remake a period costume using appropriate materials and construction processes.

Students explore historical methods of pattern drafting, construction and decorative techniques alongside traditional materials appropriate to their chosen period. Developing research skills using both primary and secondary sources, students can look at how to study an object to identify its materials, cut and construction, and place it within historical context, exploring the way people wore clothing in the past. This body of research will be developed within the students own design practice.

Placements (Fine & Performing Arts) (Option)

On completion of their degree, students need to be able to decide how best to employ the skills that they have gained. As well as the more obvious routes within a performing arts degree such as teaching, students need to be aware of what other options may be open to them practically, to explore their route out of the University and on into appropriate employment.

This module encourages students to think beyond the confines of the University, reaching into the wider community to hone their skills for future employment. This module should enable students to examine closely how various arts based organisations work from day to day, whilst at the same time relating that experience to their studies.

Visual Identity (Core)

This core module identifies and develops the individual design aesthetic of students through the formulation, communication and presentation of a range of innovative fashion responses. Students elect to develop either a digital and/or traditional portfolio to a professional standard in readiness for work placement and interview.

Engagement with the contemporary fashion and related creative industries forms an important part of this course, enabling students to define their career aspirations, portfolio and marketing strategy, all of which will be presented to staff and peers for feedback on conclusion of the module. Interdisciplinary practice with other creative areas is encouraged, resulting in a broader approach to design and communication in the context of fashion.

Visual Identity prepares students for the year three Professional Profile module.

Level 3

Dissertation (Fine & Performing Arts) (Core)

The Dissertation provides the opportunity for a student to investigate and pursue a fine and performing arts based topic of his or her own choosing, and in more depth than is normally possible in a conventional essay.

Each student will be offered mentorship, though the emphasis will fall on independent learning. Students will be expected to work on their own initiative and to provide clear evidence of their ability to collect, select and evaluate relevant information, which can subsequently be presented in a clear and logical manner, in the form of a 9000 word dissertation.

Professional Profile (Core)

This core module gives final-year students the opportunity to develop an individual approach for the presentation of their final degree work. Students can work with subject and industry experts to negotiate and formulate a feasible platform through which they will externally promote their work, personal talents and creative identity. Cross-disciplinary practice is encouraged and students will be expected to collaborate with external bodies in order to successfully achieve their desired outcome.

Professional practice, through the creation, planning, management and production of the final project, will demonstrate enterprise and employability skills aligned to the creative industries. Employability will be further enhanced through a pitch and a marketing profile, potentially preparing the graduate for a breadth of career options. The final marketing ‘vehicle’ will be presented to a panel of assessors comprising of academic staff and industry expert/s.

Research Project - Professional and Creative Conclusion - Millinery (Option)

This module concludes the students' design journey and results in the production of a final body of work for exhibition. The work should demonstrate a depth of understanding combined with conceptual, aesthetic and technical skills, and creative innovation. Students may form part of a community of designers who envisage new ways of making innovative and commercially-relevant work. The skills that students are expected to acquire could prepare them for future opportunities in the fashion industry and other creative sectors such as film, theatre and textile heritage arts, as well as preparation for running their own fashion-based business.

Students have the opportunity to emerge from this module with a collection of millinery with a supporting portfolio demonstrating creative and technical ability and individual design aesthetic.

Research Project - Professional and Creative Conclusion- Fashion (Option)

This module concludes students' design journey and results in the final production of a body of work for exhibition. The work should demonstrate a depth of understanding combined with conceptual, aesthetic and technical skills, and creative innovation. Students may form part of a community of designers who envisage new ways of making innovative and commercially-relevant work. The skills that students are expected to acquire could prepare them for future opportunities in the fashion industry and other creative sectors such as film, theatre and textile heritage arts, as well as preparation for running their own fashion-based business.

Students will have the opportunity to emerge from this module with a collection of garments with supporting portfolio demonstrating creative and technical ability and individual design aesthetic.

Research Project - Professional and Creative Development - Fashion (Option)

This elective module aims to provide students with design practice-led research skills, entrepreneurial and creative thinking skills and knowledge, and interdisciplinary approaches to fashion design. This can enable students to confidently communicate their design ideas and define their individual identity as a designer.

Students will have the opportunity to explore their fashion interests with an emphasis on design, illustration, market and technical abilities, through which research will determine their design criteria and audience for their creative outcome. Students can establish a rationale, source and plan to actualise their final project.

Innovation of ideas will infuse all aspects of this module, with an emphasis on traditional and new technologies in fabrics and construction, and engaging with the narrative of fashion.

Research Project - Professional and Creative Development - Millinery (Option)

This elective module provides students the opportunity to develop design practice-led research skills, entrepreneurial and creative thinking skills and knowledge, and interdisciplinary approaches to fashion design. This can enable students to confidently communicate their design ideas and define their individual identity as a designer.

Students have the opportunity to explore their millinery interests with an emphasis on design, illustration, market and technical abilities, through which research will determine their design criteria and audience for their creative outcome. Students may establish a rationale, source and plan to actualise their final project.

Innovation of ideas will infuse all aspects of this module with an emphasis on traditional and new technologies in fabrics and construction, and engaging with the narrative of millinery.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

Industry Links

As part of the programme, students have the opportunity to engage with experts from fashion and the creative industries throughout their degree. The format of this professional interaction varies, with recent on campus visits undertaking live projects, specialist workshops and guest lectures. The aim is to broaden creative versatility, professional approaches, empolyability and industry knowledge.

Recent experts include:

  • Frankfurt based fine artists Battenberg Cartwright
  • India Usher from the British Fashion Council and an Alumni of the course
  • Matt Kinley, an Award winning West End theatre designer
  • Nottinghamshire based Latex Fashion and Costume expert Heath Clarke
  • Top fashion show DJ/music producer ‘Joshyouare’ (Joshua Craig), whose work includes Gareth Pugh and Erdem fashion show music
  • Dominic Parczuk, Artist in Residence at Lincoln Cathedral.

Adobe Creative Cloud

All Fashion students currently have free access to Adobe Creative Cloud software via our media and design labs, in addition to a contribution towards materials costs.

Placements

Tutors aim to offer guidance and advice on suitable placement and internship opportunities, which students are encouraged to regularly engage in, even if they opt to not take the optional ‘Placements’ module in year two. It is usual for longer internships to take place over the vacation periods to fit in with the academic calendar. Costs relating to placements can be found in the Features tab.

Students also have the opportunity to participate in an annual student Internship Programme, which is a two to four week experience at the end of term 2. During this time students can apply to work with a third year of their choice, assisting them in the development and finalisation of their collection. Year one and two ‘interns’ can select their final year student depending on their own personal career goals.

Following on from this, students could have the opportunity to gain further experience assisting with the production of the end of year fashion/degree show. This eagerly awaited event is typically held in the Lincoln School of Fine and Performing Arts (LPAC) public theatre. The show aims to offer students a range of professional experience including; dressers, make-up and hair styling, choreography, back stage organisation, front of house, marketing, set design and more.

Each new academic year usually commences with the launch of a collaborative costume project. This project provides students with the opportunity to work in design teams to develop the costumes for the annual Christmas production, following a project briefing from the shows production team, writers and designers. Costume experience can be further developed in the ‘Fashion and Production’ module in year two.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

Fashion is located in the award-winning Art, Architecture and Design Building. The space offers design studios, technical spaces and machine rooms in addition to digital fabric printers, laser cutting and 3D print workshops. As part of the School of Fine and Performing Arts, students also benefit from on-site performance studios, a 450-capacity professional theatre and public gallery. These play host to student fashion shows and exhibitions, professionally supported by the in-house technical team.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

This course is designed to prepare graduates for a wide range of careers in fashion and related areas including fashion design, film and theatre costume, styling, millinery, fashion illustration, show production and the arts.

Lincoln graduate destinations have included:

  • Alexander McQueen
  • Anderson and Shepherd Tailors, Savile Row
  • Angels & Berman's Costumiers, London
  • Arcadia Group
  • BBC
  • The British Fashion Council
  • Burberry
  • Conde Nast
  • Dazed and Confused
  • Julien Macdonald
  • London Fashion Week
  • Matthew Williamson
  • Paul Smith
  • Roland Mouret
  • Royal Opera House
  • Stephen Jones Millinery.

Graduate Careers may include:

  • Costume Assistant
  • Fashion Blogger
  • Fashion Buyer
  • Fashion Consultant
  • Fashion Illustrator
  • Fashion Writer
  • Film, TV & Theatre Costume Designers
  • Freelance/Own Label
  • Menswear Designer
  • Military Costume Expert
  • Millinery Designer/Maker
  • Print Designer
  • Visual Merchandiser
  • Womenswear Designer.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

Students will be required to cover additional costs specific to the study of fashion. These typically include, but are not limited to: fabric, art materials, printing, cultural visits, final year work and display formats. If students choose to undertake a work placement, they will be responsible for their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

Visits are not assessed but are recommended as part of student development. It is usual to engage in three trips per academic year, at an average cost of £20-30 per student per event. An annual trip to a fashion centre is usually offered, with a typical three night Paris trip costing approximately £350-400 per student. This includes accommodation and travel costs, however food, inner city transport etc. are additional. Students are encouraged to pay for larger trips in instalments through the University’s Online Shop.

Year one and two students report typically spending £250-300 per year on course materials and equipment, in addition to £100 on printing. Final year expenditure can be greater due to the production of a collection, portfolio and exhibition. It should be noted however that successful work is not dependent on high costs but on the level of originality, innovation, creativity and resourcefulness.

The University awards each student an annual £200 Materials Fund which assists with the provision of some key learning materials.

Related Courses

The practice-based curriculum on the BA (Hons) Dance degree at Lincoln reflects the vocational needs of professional dancers. Students will have the opportunity to engage with practical and theoretical methods to become stronger dancers and more dynamic dance makers. A variety of modules offers students the opportunity to develop a range of transferable skills in preparation for their future career. Dance training at Lincoln focuses on contemporary techniques and works to develop and nurture creative practice.
Our BA (Hons) Drama and Theatre degree puts the creativity of performance at centre stage and aims to prepare students for a range of careers in the theatre and media, both on and off stage.
The BA (Hons) Fine Art at Lincoln is designed to provide the expertise and environment to nurture students’ creative development and expression. They can learn from practising artists and arts professionals, and be introduced to a range of professional and transferable skills.
The BA (Hons) Product Design degree at the University of Lincoln has been developed with people’s needs at the fore, concentrating on the generation, delivery and communication of ideas that challenge conventional thinking and open up new markets.

Tuition Fees

2017/18UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,500 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

In 2017/18, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

In 2018/19, fees may increase in line with Government Policy. We will update this information when fees for 2018/19 are finalised.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Showcase
  • Student Work — Fashion Show

    Sketch of Jemma Woodcock's winning Urban Outfitters design competition festival bag.Jemma Woodcock, 3rd Year Fashion Student wins 1st Prize in Urban Oufitters international design contest

    University of Lincoln final year fashion student, Jemma Woodcock, was awarded 1st Prize in a festival-themed Urban Outfitters International Design Competition.

    The competition had three categories; bag, shoe and dress, and Jemma produced the winning entry in the bag category. The brief required students to ‘Design the most covetable carry-all that carries-on any plane, train, or automobile’.

    When interviewed Jemma explained that “Versatile grunge was the inspiration behind my bag design. I felt that it was crucial for any fashion conscious individual to be prepared for anything and everything when travelling from one festival to the next”.

    She explained that the bag “combines distressed suede, tan leather and a contrasting quirky zip fastening" resulting in an item with broad appeal.

    Jemma won a $1000 cash prize and has had her bag manufactured in high volume and sold in Urban Outfitters stores and online.


    The experience so far has been challenging but enjoyable, it is amazing how much I have learnt and grown since September. Esme, 1st year


    Laura-Amy Carr fashion studies studentLincoln Fashion student awarded Society of Dyers & Colourists bursary

    Laura-Amy Carr a third-year University of Lincoln fashion student, was awarded a bursary from the Society of Dyers & Colourists to carry out work in sustainability and environmental design.

    Her final year garment collection, "The Good Life and 21st Century Self Sufficiency" is a collection of trans-seasonal luxury casual wear for women, influenced by the post-war era of "make do and mend". The collection consists of loose layers, natural fabrics and muted colours. 

    “I have tried to combine 21st century processes such as laser cutting and laser engraving with experimentation on natural products, to achieve an innovative and original look to my collection. I have even tried knitting with my dog’s fur, which is a bit tricky” said Laura-Amy.


    The University is very student friendly and has a good atmosphere. Tiffany, 2nd year


    Kerri Plumtree - DesignStudent Success in Global Fashion Competition

    Second year undergraduate Kerri Plumtree secured second place in a global competition hosted by Tartan designer GreyFriars to coincide with the first Edinburgh Fashion Week.

    Kerri’s tartan design was selected as one of only 13 finalists, and her finished product was styled and presented on the professional catwalk. She said: “Seeing your final piece on the catwalk gives you such a great buzz. Having spent so much time working on each individual garment and for so long seeing them on static mannequins, it is wonderful to see them move as you intended and really come to life.”

    Kerri’s design is a sleeveless dress with a high structured collar that runs over the shoulder and down the back. The dress has a panelled front and fullness added into the skirt, with godet’s giving a luxurious drape and plenty of movement, and is longer at the back than at the front. The dress is fully lined with an exposed zip at the back and is accessorised with a tartan flat cap, also lined and hand finished.


    Images of the 2016 Fashion Show
    The School of Fine and Performing Arts Magazine is our opportunity to share with you some of the remarkable work that takes place in our department, from ground-breaking research, to community projects, to the incredible successes of our students. 

    West End designer's new role spotlights creative careers in fashion

    Fashion students can now take advice from Matt Kinley, an award-winning set, costume and prop designer whose work has appeared in several hit West End and Broadway productions.

    Matt is acting as an industry mentor for undergraduates on the BA (Hons) Fashion programme in Lincoln’s School of Fine & Performing Arts.

    Matt initially visited the University in December 2015 to present a lecture about his work and to advise current third-year students in advance of their end-of-year Fashion Show which was staged at the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre on 27th May 2016.

    Matt said: "I hope I gave the students one or two ideas as it’s important for students to be versatile. When I started studying I wanted to be an illustrator. I never thought I would work in theatre. It was great to be in Lincoln. I had heard a lot about the ideas for course and it will be good to follow the progress of the students. I wish them good luck."

    Read more about Matt in our related press release.

    Lincoln is a beautiful city to live in and has a safe vibe to it. Amy, 1st year


    The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions].