Course Information
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4 years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BBC (or equivalent qualifications) L102 4 years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points) (or equivalent qualifications) L102

Introduction

The MEcon Economics and Finance degree at Lincoln offers a combination of core economics and finance topics, with an emphasis on business in a market context. These aim to equip students with the skills to analyse financial and economic events and their impact on markets.

During this course, students have the opportunity to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of the economy and the crucial role played by the financial sector globally. Teaching introduces students to advanced economics financial techniques, including econometrics pricing and portfolio management.

The course aims to equip students with high-level analytical skills that are valued in the business and financial sectors for decision-making, data analysis, portfolio planning, and risk management.

On this course, the fourth year of study includes the opportunity to undertake a substantive research project in an area of particular interest. Continuation on to the MEcon is dependent upon students fulfilling the progression requirements.

How You Study

This course covers topics such macro and microeconomics, financial management and econometrics. Teaching explores how financial management decisions can improve the performance and efficiency of organisations, and how capital markets operate both theoretically and behaviourally.

Students can learn how to interpret economic and financial information, manipulate data using statistical software packages and analyse contemporary economics issues.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment methods are designed to develop skills that will be useful upon graduation of the course.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln Business School Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall.

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit.

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required.

Applicants will also be required to have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above (or the equivalent), including English and a grade B in Maths.


If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Degree preparation courses for international students:

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

Level 1

Analysis of Business Data (Core)

This module aims to introduce some quantitative techniques fundamental to the analysis of business data. It seeks to promote a critical awareness and understanding of some of the processes, techniques and technology by which numerical information can be collected and communicated. Students have the opportunity to practice the systematic use of appropriate industry-standard computer technology for the acquisition, analysis and presentation of data (for example, Excel or SPSS).

Introduction to Accountancy and Finance (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the nature and mechanics of financial information. This is done in a manner which encourages a critical reflection upon the construction and uses of such information. Both management and financial accounting are considered. In particular, students can be introduced to the detail of double entry book keeping and the associated financial reports of sole traders, partnerships, limited companies (including those in a manufacturing environment) and simple not for profit organisations.

The module aims to examine the role of financial information for the variety of possible users and explore the different, often conflicting needs of these groups.

Mathematics for Economics and Finance (Core)

It is impossible to read or practice modern economics without an understanding of mathematics and the mathematical methods applied in the literature. The purpose of this module is to provide students with an opportunity to further develop an understanding of mathematical methods and to enable them to use mathematics in a series of economics applications.

Principles of Economics (Core)

This module aims to provide the non-Economist with an amalgam of economic theory and contemporary comment which seeks to prepare them for a further study in Economics. The module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a grounding in basic tools and concepts. It aims to provide ideas about labour markets and market structure, inflation and deflation, growth and stagnation and balance of payment issues and exchange rates. Through following issues in the Financial Times the emphasis is placed on applying the concepts delivered to the issues of the day.

Statistics for Economics and Finance (Core)

This module aims to develop an appreciation and understanding of the theoretical and practical issues in the application of statistical methods in decision making. The module is designed to support students’ preparation for Econometrics modules and seeks to contribute to students’ development of critical analytical skills necessary for their final year research projects.

The module aims to incorporate the use of lectures to deliver key aspects of theory and statistical concepts. Computer based practical sessions provide students with the opportunity to apply the statistical tools introduced in the lectures to real world data or problems.

Level 2

Economics of Inequality and Poverty (Option)

This modules is designed to analyse inequality and poverty from an economic perspective. Key topics include: the measurement of inequality and poverty using socio-economic data, changes in poverty and inequality over time, the causes and consequences of high economic inequality, policies for combating poverty.

Financial Management (Core)

Financial Management introduces the role of the financial manager and focuses on the key issues surrounding investment, financing and distribution decisions.

As a first introduction to finance, specifically, this covers the identification, appraisal and evaluation of investment opportunities in the context of shareholder wealth maximization, the sources of finance available and the markets they trade in. The issues of risk identification, measurement and evaluation is also explored in this module.

Fundamentals of Econometrics (Core)

This module is designed to introduce the principles and methods for statistical and econometric modeling. It provides students with the opportunity to develop the fundamental skills of using econometrics software packages that are essential for students who wish to pursue further studies or a professional career in economics, finance or related disciplines. Real-world data can be used in this module to help students to develop problem-solving skills.

History of Economic Thought (Option)

The module is designed to provide an overview of the development of political economy and its evolution into the subject of economics from the 18th Century onward. It seeks to introduce key figures in the history of economics and their classic texts, and through giving students an opportunity to develop an understanding of the historical contexts in which they developed their ideas, aims to enable the concepts and models used in other economics modules to be analysed more thoroughly.

Intermediate Macroeconomics (Core)

The purpose of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of macroeconomic theory and macroeconomic policies which are crucial for efficient functioning of an economy. Students have the chance to examine thoroughly macroeconomic theories and policies of a market economy in both closed and open economy contexts.

In order to conceptualise at the level of the macroeconomy, this course provides students with the opportunity to develop the tools of modern macroeconomic theory in the context of the global economy and aims to explain the determination of aggregate output; of employment and prices; the tools of monetary and fiscal policy used by governments to fight inflation and unemployment and to promote growth in the economy.

Intermediate Microeconomics (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide students with an opportunity to develop a theoretical underpinning for the final level economics modules. The module examines the theory of the consumer behaviour, the theory of the firm, and the action of firms in differing market structures. The module ends with an analysis of general equilibrium. The module emphasises the use of diagrams and reasoning in the analysis of microeconomic problems and solutions that affects consumers, producers and policy-makers.

Lincoln Award (Option)

The Lincoln Award is an achievement framework designed to support, enhance and recognise extra-curricular activity to broaden the participative aspect of student experiences and enhance employability. This is run in conjunction with the Student’s Union and the Career’s Service. The award is tailored for each subject and every student is guided through the award by recommendations from the student's College Careers Advisor.

The award is open to all students currently studying at the University of Lincoln. They can start the award at any point and must complete it before graduation. However, here it is made a compulsory element and is expected to be completed before the end of level two.

Level 3

Advanced Econometrics I (Cross-sectional and Panel Data Analysis) (Core)

This module aims to build on Fundamentals of Econometrics and seeks to look at further and advanced topics in econometric analysis. The module aims to provide students with the opportunity to further their econometric modeling skills by using real-world empirical applications in the fields related to economics, finance, and rural and urban economics.

The topics covered aim to reflect the development of contemporary applied econometrics. These topics include time series regression, cross-sectional and panel data regression, instrumental variables regression, experiments and quasi-experiments, and discrete choice model.

Advanced Econometrics II (Time-Series) (Core)

The module seeks to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of recent advances in econometrics for testing theories in economics and finance. It aims to develop the technical skills necessary to pursue a wide range of empirical research in economics and finance and offers the opportunity to develop some advanced time series skills.

Advanced Financial Management (Core)

This module aims to introduce the more complex areas of financial management. It is designed to familiarise students with the major theoretical developments and practices in the areas of corporate finance and risk management. Students are encouraged to develop critical thinking when considering the advantages and disadvantages of diverse practices in the areas of corporate finance and risk management.

Advanced Macroeconomics (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the baseline models and methods in modern macroeconomics necessary for advanced analysis. Skills can be developed in analysing major macroeconomic theories and their policy implications.

Advanced Microeconomics (Core)

This module aims to provide students with more analytical and critical treatment of the topics than intermediate microeconomics. Using advanced techniques, including mathematical analysis, models are developed to explain the behaviour of individual economic agents in competitive and other types of markets.

Behavioural Finance and Economics (Option)

This module aims to widen the concepts and motivations in understanding the economic activities of agents, and develops an appreciation of why these are different from standard/neo-classical economics.

The module draws on the recent research from the area of behavioural finance, biology and psychology to present a foundation, upon which to build a more critical understanding of the rational economics foundations. The module covers alternative modus operandi for economic interactions, such as Prospect Theory and other models.

The module investigates situations and the assumptions about behaviour which gives rise to certain behavioural biases, which constitute observable phenomena. These are then generalised to the “probable effects” on markets.

Decision-Making and Game Theory (Option)

This module aims to provide an introduction to decision-making in different environments. After a short review of the rational choice paradigm, the module seeks to explore intertemporal decision problem and Expected Utility Theory.

Personal Financial Planning (Option)

Personal financial planning is the process whereby individuals can determine whether or not they can meet their financial objectives through proper management of their financial resources.

This module demonstrates and explores the application of a range of techniques used to help achieve this aim. Many students will go on to work in the financial services sector. This module aims to provide these students with a fundamental underpinning of the issues they are likely to face when working in this industry.

Level 4

Contemporary Research Topics in Economics and Finance (Core)

This module is designed to expose students to a range of activities that as professional researchers they might be expected to undertake. The module has three elements. Firstly, the module aims to prepare students for job searching. Secondly, the module provides students with the opportunity to prepare for undertaking the Independent Study. Finally, it seeks to review core principles of the research approaches that students might utilise in their research.

Foundations of Economic Policy (Core)

This module provides you with the opportunity to explore the way in which economic theory and evidence can be used to analyse policy issues. The process by which economic policy is made given the choices that are available can be explored. Students can develop an awareness of the difficulties that the policy diviner faces when seeking to forge acceptable trade-offs in a world of diverse, competing interests.

Independent Study for Banking Finance and Economics (Core)

This module provides students with an opportunity to carry out a substantive research project and to demonstrate their ability to investigate and reflect critically on an aspect of the programme. Students are expected to, with the guidance from their supervisor, generate their own research topic, select a research method, obtain data and apply theory as appropriate.

By aiming to combine well-developed theoretical and methodological foundations, the Independent Study project is designed to have both a practical value as a piece of research and also be of academic value.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Placements

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

This course is taught in the award-winning David Chiddick Building, which provides students with dedicated teaching and learning spaces, and comprises lecture theatres, workshop rooms, IT laboratories and a cafe. Software including Stata, EViews and SPSS is available for students to use, as well as Datastream, the source of financial and economic data, and FT.com.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

This course is designed to enable students to develop into economists with a specialism and to progress on to roles in the business and financial services industry. This course may also be suitable for those who wish to continue to doctoral qualification.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

Lincoln’s Accountancy and Finance degree aims to equip students with a vocationally relevant and academically rigorous education in a programme which also offers the opportunity for exemptions from a number of the professional accountancy bodies. The programme provides the chance to develop practical and theoretical skills in both the nature and mechanics of financial information.
Lincoln’s Banking and Finance MFin programme is aimed at those who aspire to pursue a career in the financial sector in roles such as securities analyst, financial or investment manager or private, commercial or investment banker.
Lincoln’s Banking and Finance degree is aimed at those who aspire to a career in the financial sector in roles such as securities analyst, financial or investment manager, or as a private, commercial or investment banker.
The BA (Hons) Business Economics degree at Lincoln has been designed to provide a theoretical understanding of the economic decisions faced by business in market economies, with a focus on a practical application within national and international settings.
The BA (Hons) Business and Finance degree at Lincoln aims to equip students with the tools and knowledge to operate in a range of business environments, and to develop a broad understanding of business and finance from an international perspective.
This degree aims to equip students with the tools and frameworks to analyse economic issues, as well as the skills necessary to explore and analyse new issues as they emerge in the current dynamic economic environment.
The BSc (Hons) Economics and Finance degree at Lincoln offers a combination of core economics and finance topics enabling students to develop into economists with a specialism. The programme aims to equip students with the skills to analyse financial and economic events and their impact on markets.

Introduction

The MEcon Economics and Finance degree at Lincoln offers a combination of core economics and finance topics enabling students to develop into economists with a specialism. These aim to equip students with the skills to analyse financial and economic events and their impact on markets.

During this course, students have the opportunity to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of the economy and the crucial role played by the financial sector globally. Teaching introduces students to advanced financial techniques, including pricing and portfolio management.

Students are supported to develop high-level advanced analytical skills that are valued in the business and financial sectors for decision making, portfolio planning, risk management and working within financial markets.

For those who choose to enrol on the MEcon, the fourth year of study includes a substantive research project in an area of particular interest. Continuation on to the MEcon is dependent upon students fulfilling the progression requirements.

How You Study

This course covers topics such macro and microeconomics, financial management and econometrics. Teaching explores how financial management decisions can improve the performance and efficiency of organisations, and how capital markets operate both theoretically and behaviourally.

Students can learn how to interpret economic and financial information, manipulate data using statistical software packages and analyse contemporary economics issues.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln Business School Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall.

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit.

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above.

Applicants will also be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (or the equivalent), including English and a grade B in Maths.


If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Degree preparation courses for international students:

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

Level 1

Analysis of Business Data (Core)

This module aims to introduce some quantitative techniques fundamental to the analysis of business data. It seeks to promote a critical awareness and understanding of some of the processes, techniques and technology by which numerical information can be collected and communicated. Students have the opportunity to practice the systematic use of appropriate industry-standard computer technology for the acquisition, analysis and presentation of data (for example, Excel or SPSS).

Introduction to Accountancy and Finance (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the nature and mechanics of financial information. This is done in a manner which encourages a critical reflection upon the construction and uses of such information. Both management and financial accounting are considered. In particular, students can be introduced to the detail of double entry book keeping and the associated financial reports of sole traders, partnerships, limited companies (including those in a manufacturing environment) and simple not for profit organisations.

The module aims to examine the role of financial information for the variety of possible users and explore the different, often conflicting needs of these groups.

Mathematics for Economics and Finance (Core)

It is impossible to read or practice modern economics without an understanding of mathematics and the mathematical methods applied in the literature. The purpose of this module is to provide students with an opportunity to further develop an understanding of mathematical methods and to enable them to use mathematics in a series of economics applications.

Principles of Economics (Core)

This module aims to provides the non-Economist with with an amalgam of economic theory and contemporary comment which prepares them for a further study in Economics. There is a grounding in basic tools and concepts. It provides ideas about labour markets and market structure, the market, inflation and deflation, growth and stagnation and balance of payment issues and exchange rates.

Statistics for Economics and Finance (Core)

This module aims to develop an appreciation and understanding of the theoretical and practical issues in the application of statistical methods in decision making. The module is designed to support students’ preparation for Econometrics modules and seeks to contribute to students’ development of critical analytical skills necessary for their final year research projects.

The module aims to incorporate the use of lectures to deliver key aspects of theory and statistical concepts. Computer based practical sessions provide students with the opportunity to apply the statistical tools introduced in the lectures to real world data or problems.

Level 2

Economics of Inequality and Poverty (Option)

This modules is designed to analyse inequality and poverty from an economic perspective. Key topics include: the measurement of inequality and poverty using socio-economic data, changes in poverty and inequality over time, the causes and consequences of high economic inequality, policies for combating poverty.

Financial Management (Core)

Financial Management introduces the role of the financial manager and focuses on the key issues surrounding investment, financing and distribution decisions.

As a first introduction to finance, specifically, this covers the identification, appraisal and evaluation of investment opportunities in the context of shareholder wealth maximization, the sources of finance available and the markets they trade in. The issues of risk identification, measurement and evaluation is also explored in this module.

Fundamentals of Econometrics (Core)

This module is designed to introduce the principles and methods for statistical and econometric modeling. It provides students with the opportunity to develop the fundamental skills of using econometrics software packages that are essential for students who wish to pursue further studies or a professional career in economics, finance or related disciplines. Real-world data can be used in this module to help students to develop problem-solving skills.

History of Economic Thought (Option)

The module is designed to provide an overview of the development of political economy and its evolution into the subject of economics from the 18th Century onward. It seeks to introduce key figures in the history of economics and their classic texts, and through giving students an opportunity to develop an understanding of the historical contexts in which they developed their ideas, aims to enable the concepts and models used in other economics modules to be analysed more thoroughly.

Intermediate Macroeconomics (Core)

The purpose of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of macroeconomic theory and macroeconomic policies which are crucial for efficient functioning of an economy. Students have the chance to examine thoroughly macroeconomic theories and policies of a market economy in both closed and open economy contexts.

In order to conceptualise at the level of the macroeconomy, this course provides students with the opportunity to develop the tools of modern macroeconomic theory in the context of the global economy and aims to explain the determination of aggregate output; of employment and prices; the tools of monetary and fiscal policy used by governments to fight inflation and unemployment and to promote growth in the economy.

Intermediate Microeconomics (Core)

The aim of this module is to provide students with an opportunity to develop a theoretical underpinning for the final level economics modules. The module examines the theory of the consumer behaviour, the theory of the firm, and the action of firms in differing market structures. The module ends with an analysis of general equilibrium. The module emphasises the use of diagrams and reasoning in the analysis of microeconomic problems and solutions that affects consumers, producers and policy-makers.

Lincoln Award (Option)

The Lincoln Award is an achievement framework designed to support, enhance and recognise extra-curricular activity to broaden the participative aspect of student experiences and enhance employability. This is run in conjunction with the Student’s Union and the Career’s Service. The award is tailored for each subject and every student is guided through the award by recommendations from the student's College Careers Advisor.

The award is open to all students currently studying at the University of Lincoln. They can start the award at any point and must complete it before graduation. However, here it is made a compulsory element and is expected to be completed before the end of level two.

Level 3

Advanced Econometrics I (Cross-sectional and Panel Data Analysis) (Core)

This module aims to build on Fundamentals of Econometrics and seeks to look at further and advanced topics in econometric analysis. The module aims to provide students with the opportunity to further their econometric modeling skills by using real-world empirical applications in the fields related to economics, finance, and rural and urban economics.

The topics covered aim to reflect the development of contemporary applied econometrics. These topics include time series regression, cross-sectional and panel data regression, instrumental variables regression, experiments and quasi-experiments, and discrete choice model.

Advanced Econometrics II (Time-Series) (Core)

The module seeks to provide students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of recent advances in econometrics for testing theories in economics and finance. It aims to develop the technical skills necessary to pursue a wide range of empirical research in economics and finance and offers the opportunity to develop some advanced time series skills.

Advanced Financial Management (Core)

This module aims to introduce the more complex areas of financial management. It is designed to familiarise students with the major theoretical developments and practices in the areas of corporate finance and risk management. Students are encouraged to develop critical thinking when considering the advantages and disadvantages of diverse practices in the areas of corporate finance and risk management.

Advanced Macroeconomics (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the baseline models and methods in modern macroeconomics necessary for advanced analysis. Skills can be developed in analysing major macroeconomic theories and their policy implications.

Advanced Microeconomics (Core)

This module aims to provide students with more analytical and critical treatment of the topics than intermediate microeconomics. Using advanced techniques, including mathematical analysis, models are developed to explain the behaviour of individual economic agents in competitive and other types of markets.

Behavioural Finance and Economics (Option)

This module aims to widen the concepts and motivations in understanding the economic activities of agents, and develops an appreciation of why these are different from standard/neo-classical economics.

The module draws on the recent research from the area of behavioural finance, biology and psychology to present a foundation, upon which to build a more critical understanding of the rational economics foundations. The module covers alternative modus operandi for economic interactions, such as Prospect Theory and other models.

The module investigates situations and the assumptions about behaviour which gives rise to certain behavioural biases, which constitute observable phenomena. These are then generalised to the “probable effects” on markets.

Decision-Making and Game Theory (Option)

This module aims to provide an introduction to decision-making in different environments. After a short review of the rational choice paradigm, the module seeks to explore intertemporal decision problem and Expected Utility Theory.

Personal Financial Planning (Option)

Personal financial planning is the process whereby individuals can determine whether or not they can meet their financial objectives through proper management of their financial resources.

This module demonstrates and explores the application of a range of techniques used to help achieve this aim. Many students will go on to work in the financial services sector. This module aims to provide these students with a fundamental underpinning of the issues they are likely to face when working in this industry.

Level 4

Contemporary Research Topics in Economics and Finance (Core)

This module is designed to expose students to a range of activities that as professional researchers they might be expected to undertake. The module has three elements. Firstly, the module aims to prepare students for job searching. Secondly, the module provides students with the opportunity to prepare for undertaking the Independent Study. Finally, it seeks to review core principles of the research approaches that students might utilise in their research.

Foundations of Economic Policy (Core)

This module provides you with the opportunity to explore the way in which economic theory and evidence can be used to analyse policy issues. The process by which economic policy is made given the choices that are available can be explored. Students can develop an awareness of the difficulties that the policy diviner faces when seeking to forge acceptable trade-offs in a world of diverse, competing interests.

Independent Study for Banking Finance and Economics (Core)

This module provides students with an opportunity to carry out a substantive research project and to demonstrate their ability to investigate and reflect critically on an aspect of the programme. Students are expected to, with the guidance from their supervisor, generate their own research topic, select a research method, obtain data and apply theory as appropriate.

By aiming to combine well-developed theoretical and methodological foundations, the Independent Study project is designed to have both a practical value as a piece of research and also be of academic value.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Placements

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

This course is taught in the award-winning David Chiddick Building, which provides students with dedicated teaching and learning spaces, and comprises lecture theatres, workshop rooms, IT laboratories and a cafe. Software including Stata, EViews and SPSS is available for students to use, as well as Datastream, the source of financial and economic data, and FT.com.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

This course is designed to enable students to develop into economists with a specialism and to progress on to roles in the business and financial services industry.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

Lincoln’s Accountancy and Finance degree aims to equip students with a vocationally relevant and academically rigorous education in a programme which also offers the opportunity for exemptions from a number of the professional accountancy bodies. The programme provides the chance to develop practical and theoretical skills in both the nature and mechanics of financial information.
Lincoln’s Banking and Finance MFin programme is aimed at those who aspire to pursue a career in the financial sector in roles such as securities analyst, financial or investment manager or private, commercial or investment banker.
Lincoln’s Banking and Finance degree is aimed at those who aspire to a career in the financial sector in roles such as securities analyst, financial or investment manager, or as a private, commercial or investment banker.
The BA (Hons) Business Economics degree at Lincoln has been designed to provide a theoretical understanding of the economic decisions faced by business in market economies, with a focus on a practical application within national and international settings.
The BA (Hons) Business and Finance degree at Lincoln aims to equip students with the tools and knowledge to operate in a range of business environments, and to develop a broad understanding of business and finance from an international perspective.
This degree aims to equip students with the tools and frameworks to analyse economic issues, as well as the skills necessary to explore and analyse new issues as they emerge in the current dynamic economic environment.
The BSc (Hons) Economics and Finance degree at Lincoln offers a combination of core economics and finance topics enabling students to develop into economists with a specialism. The programme aims to equip students with the skills to analyse financial and economic events and their impact on markets.

Tuition Fees

2018/19 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level
£13,800 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

In 2018/19, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions].