Course Information
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25 November and 13 December 2017
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3 or 4 years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BBC (or equivalent qualifications) N400 3 or 4 years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated BBC (112 UCAS Tariff points) (or equivalent qualifications) N400

top20% Accounting courses at Lincoln are ranked in the top 20% in the UK for overall satisfaction and organisation and management according to the National Student Survey 2017.

Introduction

Lincoln’s Accountancy and Finance degree aims to equip students with a vocationally relevant and academically rigorous education in a programme which also offers the opportunity for exemptions from a number of the professional accountancy bodies. The programme provides the chance to develop practical and theoretical skills in both the nature and mechanics of financial information.

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the critical-thinking skills, knowledge and problem-solving abilities that are needed by senior leaders and decision-makers in business. The ability to reflect critically on their role, both as private individuals and as members of society is also considered.

Accreditations

The course provides exemptions from elements of examination for the following:

  • Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA)
  • Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA)
  • Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW)
  • Association of International Accountants (AIA).

Depending on the exemptions sought, students may be required to undertake specific modules. Other exemptions are achieved upon completion of the course.

Download the full list of exemptions here:
http://lncn.eu/akmx

Is This Course Right For Me?

The Accountancy and Finance course aims to combine intellectual rigor with personal development. It is designed to provide an academic grounding in topics such as financial accountancy, management accountancy, financial management, marketing, taxation and strategic management.

How You Study

In addition to an introduction to accountancy and finance, the first year introduces students to key elements of business. The second year builds on this foundation with financial accountancy, management accountancy, financial management and economics in addition to specialist options, including audit. The opportunity to develop skills in SAGE accounting are embedded within the programme during second year.

In the final year, students have the opportunity to examine financial accountancy, financial management and management accountancy at an advanced level and can tailor their degree by selecting from a range of options aligned to individual interests and career ambitions.

Optional final year modules can include Taxation, Personal Financial Planning, Financial Strategy, Private Banking and Wealth Management and Behavioural Finance and Economics.

In addition, there is the opportunity to take a year-long work placement (Professional Practice) after the second year. A work placement can allow students to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. More details regarding the potential costs associated with these placements are outlined in the Features tab.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

How You Are Assessed

The course combines a range of assessment methods. Assignments are designed to allow students to manage their own time, develop their research and analytical skills, and explore subjects in greater depth. They take a range of forms including essays, reports and oral presentations prepared individually and in groups.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln Business School Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2017-18

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required.

Students will also need at least five GCSEs at grade C or above, which must include English and Maths.

We encourage applications from mature students and we will give special individual consideration to those who are in this category and do not have the standard entry requirements.

Students whose first language is not English will also need British Council IELTS band 6.0 or above or equivalent.

For international students who do not meet criteria for direct entry to this degree we offer the International Year One in Business and Management. Depending on your English language level you will study 3 or 4 terms then progress directly to the second year of this degree.

Degree preparation courses for international students:
The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visithttp://www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

Level 1

Analysis of Business Data (Core)

This module aims to introduce some quantitative techniques fundamental to the analysis of business data. It seeks to promote a critical awareness and understanding of some of the processes, techniques and technology by which numerical information can be collected and communicated. Students have the opportunity to practice the systematic use of appropriate industry-standard computer technology for the acquisition, analysis and presentation of data (for example, Excel or SPSS).

Introduction to Accountancy and Finance (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the nature and mechanics of financial information. This is done in a manner which encourages a critical reflection upon the construction and uses of such information. Both management and financial accounting are considered. In particular, students can be introduced to the detail of double entry book keeping and the associated financial reports of sole traders, partnerships, limited companies (including those in a manufacturing environment) and simple not for profit organisations.

The module aims to examine the role of financial information for the variety of possible users and explore the different, often conflicting needs of these groups.

Introduction to Business Law (Core)

This module aims to serve as an introduction to the English legal system and English contract law. The module is designed to give students the opportunity to develop a basic understanding of contract issues in England and seeks to enable students to appreciate when a legally binding agreement comes into existence, the obligations involved and the consequences of breaking such agreements.

Contract law underpins a company’s dealings with its customers, employees and suppliers. It is important that students appreciate the legal context in which everyday business decisions are made.

Organisational Behaviour (Core)

This module is intended for students who are interested in understanding the way people work, as individuals and as group members in firms. The module explores essential topics in a clear, concise and informative manner, aiming to introduce students to the interpersonal perceptual processes in a work environment; the key behavioural factors determining effective and ineffective groups; the usefulness of theories on leadership/management styles; and the difficulties in implementing change in organisations.

Principles of Economics (Core)

This module aims to provide the non-Economist with an amalgam of economic theory and contemporary comment which seeks to prepare them for a further study in Economics. The module is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a grounding in basic tools and concepts. It aims to provide ideas about labour markets and market structure, inflation and deflation, growth and stagnation and balance of payment issues and exchange rates. Through following issues in the Financial Times the emphasis is placed on applying the concepts delivered to the issues of the day.

Principles of Marketing (Core)

This module of the programme is designed for students who have little or no marketing knowledge. The aim is to familiarise students with the key concepts and issues of marketing, giving them a thorough grasp of the sort of marketing decisions there are to be made and what factors affect them.

Level 2

Audit and Assurance (Option)

This module explores the importance of auditing work and the regulatory and ethical requirements of working within an accounting environment. The module therefore offers a practical as well as a theoretical perspective on auditing, providing students with the opportunity to develop their understanding of the type of role they would be carrying out if they were to pursue a career as an auditor.

Competition and Regulation (Option)

This module explores some key areas of microeconomic policy for business. At its heart it is a consideration of competition theory and industrial structure. This informs the analysis of competition policy in sectors, such as telecoms and airlines. This is extended to a consideration of injecting competition into the state sector. Other areas of state intervention are explored where activities are taxes; prices are regulated; or industry is incentivised to relocate. Throughout, concepts and applications are made relevant to real world examples.

Financial Accountancy (Core)

This module is designed to provide students with an introduction to the more complex areas of financial accountancy and financial reporting under International GAAP. It commences with the role and requirements of corporate financial reporting in the UK and explores the increasingly important subjects of ethics and corporate governance. Students have the opportunity to develop a solid foundation in the techniques of accounts preparation and a critical understanding of key areas of financial accounting. Single level group structures are introduced which may help lay the foundation for more advanced study.

Financial Management (Core)

Financial Management introduces the role of the financial manager and focuses on the key issues surrounding investment, financing and distribution decisions.

As a first introduction to finance, specifically, this covers the identification, appraisal and evaluation of investment opportunities in the context of shareholder wealth maximization, the sources of finance available and the markets they trade in. The issues of risk identification, measurement and evaluation is also explored in this module.

International Economics (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop knowledge of the gains to be made from trading internationally. It focuses also on the gains to be made from economic integration and the globalisation process. The module also seeks to examine the main patterns of trade and exchange and aims to demonstrate how free trade can be influenced by government and the future risks of protectionism.

Macroeconomic Environment for Business (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for students to extend their understanding of macroeconomics. It emphasises the role of macroeconomics as an applied discipline, focusing on issues facing the world’s economies featured in the Financial Times. By the end students are expected to be able to use the techniques learned to interpret changing macroeconomic aggregates, events and policies.

Management Accountancy (Core)

This modules is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid technical and critical understanding of the key management accountancy techniques and issues that relate to planning and performance reporting.

The major areas of study are:

  • Cost accounting systems
  • Standard costing
  • Budgeting.
  • Performance measurement.

Professional Practice (Option)

This module is aimed at those students who have decided to take a year out of formal studies to gain accredited work experience and are registered on a degree programme with an accredited professional practice element. The Professional Practice Year aims to give students a continuous experience of full-time work within an organisation.

It should be a three way co-operative activity between employer, student and University from which all parties benefit. Students can choose to pursue a variety of options including a placement year, a consultancy project or a work-based dissertation. Potential costs relating to this module are outlined in the Features tab.

Research and Consultancy Methods (Option)

This module explores various qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis. Students will have the chance to learn how to conduct, transcribe and analyse semi-structured and open-ended interviews and other forms of text. The principles and procedures of survey design and statistical modelling will also be discussed; students are expected to use appropriate computer-based statistical software, such as Stata, Eviews and SPSS, to analyse data.

Level 3

Advanced Financial Accountancy (Core)

This module is designed to provide students with an introduction to the more complex areas of financial accountancy and financial reporting under International GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles). It seeks to build upon the concepts and techniques of Financial Accounting, developing some of the themes introduced at that level.

The module commences with corporate financial reporting under International GAAP in the UK and continues with the increasingly important subjects of non-financial reporting. It aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid foundation in the techniques of complex accounts preparation and a critical understanding of short comings in financial reporting.

Advanced Financial Management (Core)

This module aims to introduce the more complex areas of financial management. It is designed to familiarise students with the major theoretical developments and practices in the areas of corporate finance and risk management. Students are encouraged to develop critical thinking when considering the advantages and disadvantages of diverse practices in the areas of corporate finance and risk management.

Advanced Management Accountancy (Core)

This module provides the competencies needed to plan and control in order to support the implementation of the organisation’s strategies. This module helps students to develop abilities to critically evaluate, interpret and discuss management accounting issues. The module is vocationally relevant and academically rigorous and embraces both technical skills and social science theories which assist in the move towards achieving a professional qualification and satisfying employer needs.

Behavioural Finance and Economics (Option)

This module aims to widen the concepts and motivations in understanding the economic activities of agents, and develops an appreciation of why these are different from standard/neo-classical economics.

The module draws on the recent research from the area of behavioural finance, biology and psychology to present a foundation, upon which to build a more critical understanding of the rational economics foundations. The module covers alternative modus operandi for economic interactions, such as Prospect Theory and other models.

The module investigates situations and the assumptions about behaviour which gives rise to certain behavioural biases, which constitute observable phenomena. These are then generalised to the “probable effects” on markets.

Consultancy Project (Business) (Option)

The Consultancy Project module provides the opportunity for students to work as Marketing/PR/Advertising consultants on a ‘live’ company project. The overriding goal is for students to experience real company problems first hand and to work in small groups to attempt to find information and ideas that offer meaningful solutions to the client company.

Students will have the chance to apply knowledge gained from the degree programme in a real world environment.

Dissertation (Business) (Option)

The dissertation is a major independent piece of work intended to develop a student’s ability to actively engage with core disciplinary issues. The dissertation focuses on analysis, synthesis and critique. In undertaking dissertation research, students are required to demonstrate the ability to identify, organise and select from a large body of material in order to produce a coherent, well-defined and internally consistent representation of their findings.

Financial Strategy (Option)

The learnings throughout this module, from strategic analysis, modelling and challenge through to the corporate and financial analysis of organisations will be invaluable in whichever type of organisation a student is eventually employed. The module aims to teach students to challenge and think into the future, whilst ensuring the vision has a firm financial and systems foundation.

Personal Financial Planning (Option)

Personal financial planning is the process whereby individuals can determine whether or not they can meet their financial objectives through proper management of their financial resources.

This module demonstrates and explores the application of a range of techniques used to help achieve this aim. Many students will go on to work in the financial services sector. This module aims to provide these students with a fundamental underpinning of the issues they are likely to face when working in this industry.

Private Banking and Wealth Management (Option)

Private Banking and Wealth Management is a module targeted at students who wish to build upon their previous knowledge of financial markets and products by analysing and evaluating the core financial service of wealth management. The module aims to both broaden students’ knowledge and understanding of the financial services industry and further develop their intellectual and practical skills via the analysis and evaluation of the wealth management process.

Taxation (Option)

This module is designed to provide an overview of business and personal taxation and the implementation thereof through the planning process. Students have the opportunity to develop their knowledge of incorporating the impact of taxation in personal and business decisions. The module is of particular relevance to those students wishing to pursue a career in the accountancy or financial services sector and reinforces the importance of an ethical and professional approach.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

At Lincoln International Business School, we take an international perspective and our research informs teaching on all of our courses. We carry out research with businesses, government and not-for-profit organisations to deepen knowledge and understanding in order to make a tangible difference to industry and society. Areas of research expertise include marketing, supply chain management, entrepreneurship, organisational studies, developing communities and economic development.

Placements

Students have the opportunity to take a year-long work placement (Professional Practice) after the second year. A work placement can allow students to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. In previous years some of our students have been offered a job with their placement employer before they graduate. Please note that students who choose to undertake a work placement do not pay tuition fees for that year, but are required to cover their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

There are also opportunities for relevant work experience and career development as part of the degree course itself, as well as through various other Lincoln International Business School and University schemes. For more information about this please visit:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/lbs/workplacements/

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

This course is taught in the award-winning David Chiddick Building, which is situated in the centre of the city of Lincoln on the Brayford campus. It provides dedicated teaching and learning spaces and comprises lecture theatres, workshop rooms, IT laboratories and a café. Software including SAGE is available for you to use, as well as SPSS, Datastream (the source of financial and economic data), and FT.com.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

A degree in Accountancy and Finance can prepare students for a career as an accountant, personal financial manager, tax adviser or chief financial officer.

Our graduates have gone on to work in the private and public sectors in financial and management roles around the world. Previous graduates have progressed to roles at companies including HMRC, PricewaterhouseCoopers and Santander.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

Lincoln’s Banking and Finance MFin programme is aimed at those who aspire to pursue a career in the financial sector in roles such as securities analyst, financial or investment manager or private, commercial or investment banker.
Lincoln’s Banking and Finance degree is aimed at those who aspire to a career in the financial sector in roles such as securities analyst, financial or investment manager, or as a private, commercial or investment banker.
The MEcon Economics and Finance degree at Lincoln offers a combination of core economics and finance topics enabling students to develop into economists with a specialism. These aim to equip students with the skills to analyse financial and economic events and their impact on markets.
The BSc (Hons) Economics and Finance degree at Lincoln offers a combination of core economics and finance topics enabling students to develop into economists with a specialism. The programme aims to equip students with the skills to analyse financial and economic events and their impact on markets.
Lincoln’s BA (Hons) International Business Management course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid grounding in business process and mechanics, the skills to operate in a global environment and an in-depth understanding of the international marketplace.
This research-informed BSc (Hons) Mathematics degree aims to provide a fundamental education in the fascinating field of mathematics, including pure and applied mathematics. Students have opportunities to work alongside academic staff on challenging projects, which could contribute to academic research or collaboration with industry.
The research-informed MMath Mathematics degree aims to provide a fundamental education in mathematics, including pure and applied mathematics. There will be opportunities for students to develop high-level mathematical and problem-solving skills and to apply these in a variety of contexts. Students will also have the chance to work alongside fellow undergraduates and academic staff on projects.

Introduction

Lincoln’s Accountancy and Finance degree aims to equip students with a vocationally relevant and academically rigorous education in a programme which also offers the opportunity for exemptions from a number of the professional accountancy bodies. The programme provides the chance to develop practical and theoretical skills in both the nature and mechanics of financial information.

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the critical-thinking skills, knowledge and problem-solving abilities that are needed by senior leaders and decision-makers in business. The ability to reflect critically on their role, both as private individuals and as members of society is also considered.

Accreditations

The course provides exemptions from elements of examination for the following:

  • Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA)
  • Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA)
  • Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW)
  • Association of International Accountants (AIA).

Depending on the exemptions sought, students may be required to undertake specific modules. Other exemptions are achieved upon completion of the course.

Download the full list of exemptions here:
http://lncn.eu/akmx

Is This Course Right For Me?

The Accountancy and Finance course aims to combine intellectual rigor with personal development. It is designed to provide an academic grounding in topics such as financial accountancy, management accountancy, financial management, marketing, taxation and strategic management.

How You Study

In addition to an introduction to accountancy and finance, the first year introduces students to key elements of business. The second year builds on this foundation with financial accountancy, management accountancy, financial management and economics in addition to specialist options, including audit. The opportunity to develop skills in SAGE accounting are embedded within the programme during second year.

In the final year, students have the opportunity to examine financial accountancy, financial management and management accountancy at an advanced level and can tailor their degree by selecting from a range of options aligned to individual interests and career ambitions.

Optional final year modules can include Taxation, Personal Financial Planning, Financial Strategy, Private Banking and Wealth Management and Behavioural Finance and Economics.

In addition, there is the opportunity for all full-time students on this course to take a year-long work placement after the second year. A work placement can allow students to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. More details regarding the potential costs associated with these placements are outlined in the Features tab.

On this course, in the first year as an Accountancy and Finance student you will typically undertake 13 hours of contact time each week, which will include seminars, tutorials and lectures. In the second year, this may also include project supervision.

As a general guide the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Students on the Accountancy and Finance degree learn from academic staff who are specialists in their field. In addition, students may receive insight from external speakers and they will be supported in their learning by other students.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

How You Are Assessed

For this course assessment is 40.5% coursework, 10% practical exams and 49.5% written exams in the first year. In the second year it is 35% coursework and 65% written exams, and in the third year is it 45.2% coursework, 2% practical exams and 52.8% written exams.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln’s policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Staff

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

For a comprehensive list of teaching staff, please see our Lincoln Business School Staff Pages.

Entry Requirements 2018-19

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above.

Students will also need at least three GCSEs at grade C or above, which must include English and Maths.

We encourage applications from mature students and we will give special individual consideration to those who are in this category and do not have the standard entry requirements.

Students whose first language is not English will also need British Council IELTS band 6.0 or above or equivalent.

For international students who do not meet criteria for direct entry to this degree we offer the International Year One in Business and Management. Depending on your English language level you will study 3 or 4 terms then progress directly to the second year of this degree.

Degree preparation courses for international students:
The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visithttp://www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

Level 1

Analysis of Business Data (Core)

This module aims to introduce some quantitative techniques fundamental to the analysis of business data. It seeks to promote a critical awareness and understanding of some of the processes, techniques and technology by which numerical information can be collected and communicated. Students have the opportunity to practice the systematic use of appropriate industry-standard computer technology for the acquisition, analysis and presentation of data (for example, Excel or SPSS).

Introduction to Accountancy and Finance (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the nature and mechanics of financial information. This is done in a manner which encourages a critical reflection upon the construction and uses of such information. Both management and financial accounting are considered. In particular, students can be introduced to the detail of double entry book keeping and the associated financial reports of sole traders, partnerships, limited companies (including those in a manufacturing environment) and simple not for profit organisations.

The module aims to examine the role of financial information for the variety of possible users and explore the different, often conflicting needs of these groups.

Introduction to Business Law (Core)

This module aims to serve as an introduction to the English legal system and English contract law. The module is designed to give students the opportunity to develop a basic understanding of contract issues in England and seeks to enable students to appreciate when a legally binding agreement comes into existence, the obligations involved and the consequences of breaking such agreements.

Contract law underpins a company’s dealings with its customers, employees and suppliers. It is important that students appreciate the legal context in which everyday business decisions are made.

Organisational Behaviour (Core)

This module is intended for students who are interested in understanding the way people work, as individuals and as group members in firms. The module explores essential topics in a clear, concise and informative manner, aiming to introduce students to the interpersonal perceptual processes in a work environment; the key behavioural factors determining effective and ineffective groups; the usefulness of theories on leadership/management styles; and the difficulties in implementing change in organisations.

Principles of Economics (Core)

This module aims to provides the non-Economist with with an amalgam of economic theory and contemporary comment which prepares them for a further study in Economics. There is a grounding in basic tools and concepts. It provides ideas about labour markets and market structure, the market, inflation and deflation, growth and stagnation and balance of payment issues and exchange rates.

Principles of Marketing (Core)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of marketing. Students will have the chance to examine the key concepts and issues of marketing.

Level 2

Audit and Assurance (Option)

This module explores the importance of auditing work and the regulatory and ethical requirements of working within an accounting environment. The module therefore offers a practical as well as a theoretical perspective on auditing, providing students with the opportunity to develop their understanding of the type of role they would be carrying out if they were to pursue a career as an auditor.

Competition and Regulation (Option)

This module explores some key areas of microeconomic policy for business. At its heart it is a consideration of competition theory and industrial structure. This informs the analysis of competition policy in sectors, such as telecoms and airlines. This is extended to a consideration of injecting competition into the state sector. Other areas of state intervention are explored where activities are taxes; prices are regulated; or industry is incentivised to relocate. Throughout, concepts and applications are made relevant to real world examples.

Financial Accountancy (Core)

This module is designed to provide students with an introduction to the more complex areas of financial accountancy and financial reporting under International GAAP. It commences with the role and requirements of corporate financial reporting in the UK and explores the increasingly important subjects of ethics and corporate governance. Students have the opportunity to develop a solid foundation in the techniques of accounts preparation and a critical understanding of key areas of financial accounting. Single level group structures are introduced which may help lay the foundation for more advanced study.

Financial Management (Core)

Financial Management introduces the role of the financial manager and focuses on the key issues surrounding investment, financing and distribution decisions.

As a first introduction to finance, specifically, this covers the identification, appraisal and evaluation of investment opportunities in the context of shareholder wealth maximization, the sources of finance available and the markets they trade in. The issues of risk identification, measurement and evaluation is also explored in this module.

International Economics (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop knowledge of the gains to be made from trading internationally. It focuses also on the gains to be made from economic integration and the globalisation process. The module also seeks to examine the main patterns of trade and exchange and aims to demonstrate how free trade can be influenced by government and the future risks of protectionism.

Macroeconomic Environment for Business (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for students to extend their understanding of macroeconomics. It emphasises the role of macroeconomics as an applied discipline, focusing on issues facing the world’s economies featured in the Financial Times. By the end students are expected to be able to use the techniques learned to interpret changing macroeconomic aggregates, events and policies.

Management Accountancy (Core)

This modules is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid technical and critical understanding of the key management accountancy techniques and issues that relate to planning and performance reporting.

The major areas of study are:

  • Cost accounting systems
  • Standard costing
  • Budgeting.
  • Performance measurement.

Professional Practice (Option)

This module is aimed at those students who have decided to take a year out of formal studies to gain accredited work experience and are registered on a degree programme with an accredited professional practice element. The Professional Practice Year aims to give students a continuous experience of full-time work within an organisation.

It should be a three way co-operative activity between employer, student and University from which all parties benefit. Students can choose to pursue a variety of options including a placement year, a consultancy project or a work-based dissertation. Potential costs relating to this module are outlined in the Features tab.

Research and Consultancy Methods (Option)

This module explores various qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis. Students will have the chance to learn how to conduct, transcribe and analyse semi-structured and open-ended interviews and other forms of text. The principles and procedures of survey design and statistical modelling will also be discussed; students are expected to use appropriate computer-based statistical software, such as Stata, Eviews and SPSS, to analyse data.

Level 3

Advanced Financial Accountancy (Core)

This module is designed to provide students with an introduction to the more complex areas of financial accountancy and financial reporting under International GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles). It seeks to build upon the concepts and techniques of Financial Accounting, developing some of the themes introduced at that level.

The module commences with corporate financial reporting under International GAAP in the UK and continues with the increasingly important subjects of non-financial reporting. It aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid foundation in the techniques of complex accounts preparation and a critical understanding of short comings in financial reporting.

Advanced Financial Management (Core)

This module aims to introduce the more complex areas of financial management. It is designed to familiarise students with the major theoretical developments and practices in the areas of corporate finance and risk management. Students are encouraged to develop critical thinking when considering the advantages and disadvantages of diverse practices in the areas of corporate finance and risk management.

Advanced Management Accountancy (Core)

This module provides the competencies needed to plan and control in order to support the implementation of the organisation’s strategies. This module helps students to develop abilities to critically evaluate, interpret and discuss management accounting issues. The module is vocationally relevant and academically rigorous and embraces both technical skills and social science theories which assist in the move towards achieving a professional qualification and satisfying employer needs.

Behavioural Finance and Economics (Option)

This module aims to widen the concepts and motivations in understanding the economic activities of agents, and develops an appreciation of why these are different from standard/neo-classical economics.

The module draws on the recent research from the area of behavioural finance, biology and psychology to present a foundation, upon which to build a more critical understanding of the rational economics foundations. The module covers alternative modus operandi for economic interactions, such as Prospect Theory and other models.

The module investigates situations and the assumptions about behaviour which gives rise to certain behavioural biases, which constitute observable phenomena. These are then generalised to the “probable effects” on markets.

Consultancy Project (Business) (Option)

The Consultancy Project module provides the opportunity for students to work as Marketing/PR/Advertising consultants on a ‘live’ company project. The overriding goal is for students to experience real company problems first hand and to work in small groups to attempt to find information and ideas that offer meaningful solutions to the client company.

Students will have the chance to apply knowledge gained from the degree programme in a real world environment.

Financial Strategy (Option)

The learnings throughout this module, from strategic analysis, modelling and challenge through to the corporate and financial analysis of organisations will be invaluable in whichever type of organisation a student is eventually employed. The module aims to teach students to challenge and think into the future, whilst ensuring the vision has a firm financial and systems foundation.

Personal Financial Planning (Option)

Personal financial planning is the process whereby individuals can determine whether or not they can meet their financial objectives through proper management of their financial resources.

This module demonstrates and explores the application of a range of techniques used to help achieve this aim. Many students will go on to work in the financial services sector. This module aims to provide these students with a fundamental underpinning of the issues they are likely to face when working in this industry.

Private Banking and Wealth Management (Option)

Private Banking and Wealth Management is a module targeted at students who wish to build upon their previous knowledge of financial markets and products by analysing and evaluating the core financial service of wealth management. The module aims to both broaden students’ knowledge and understanding of the financial services industry and further develop their intellectual and practical skills via the analysis and evaluation of the wealth management process.

Taxation (Option)

This module is designed to provide an overview of business and personal taxation and the implementation thereof through the planning process. Students have the opportunity to develop their knowledge of incorporating the impact of taxation in personal and business decisions. The module is of particular relevance to those students wishing to pursue a career in the accountancy or financial services sector and reinforces the importance of an ethical and professional approach.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Special Features

At Lincoln International Business School, we take an international perspective and our research informs teaching on all of our courses. We carry out research with businesses, government and not-for-profit organisations to deepen knowledge and understanding in order to make a tangible difference to industry and society. Areas of research expertise include marketing, supply chain management, entrepreneurship, organisational studies, developing communities and economic development.

Placements

All full-time students on this course have the opportunity to take a year-long work placement after the second year. A work placement can allow students to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. In previous years some of our students have been offered a job with their placement employer before they graduate. Please note that students who choose to undertake a work placement do not pay tuition fees for that year, but are required to cover their travel, accommodation and general living costs.

There are also opportunities for relevant work experience and career development as part of the degree course itself, as well as through various other Lincoln International Business School and University schemes. For more information about this please visit:

http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/lbs/workplacements/

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Facilities

This course is taught in the award-winning David Chiddick Building, which is situated in the centre of the city of Lincoln on the Brayford campus. It provides dedicated teaching and learning spaces and comprises lecture theatres, workshop rooms, IT laboratories and a café. Software including SAGE is available for you to use, as well as SPSS, Datastream (the source of financial and economic data), and FT.com.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

View our campus pages [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/ourcampus/] to learn more about our teaching and learning facilities.

Career Opportunities

A degree in Accountancy and Finance can prepare students for a career as an accountant, personal financial manager, tax adviser or chief financial officer.

Our graduates have gone on to work in the private and public sectors in financial and management roles around the world. Previous graduates have progressed to roles at companies including HMRC, PricewaterhouseCoopers and Santander.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Related Courses

Lincoln’s Banking and Finance MFin programme is aimed at those who aspire to pursue a career in the financial sector in roles such as securities analyst, financial or investment manager or private, commercial or investment banker.
Lincoln’s Banking and Finance degree is aimed at those who aspire to a career in the financial sector in roles such as securities analyst, financial or investment manager, or as a private, commercial or investment banker.
The MEcon Economics and Finance degree at Lincoln offers a combination of core economics and finance topics enabling students to develop into economists with a specialism. These aim to equip students with the skills to analyse financial and economic events and their impact on markets.
The BSc (Hons) Economics and Finance degree at Lincoln offers a combination of core economics and finance topics enabling students to develop into economists with a specialism. The programme aims to equip students with the skills to analyse financial and economic events and their impact on markets.
Lincoln’s BA (Hons) International Business Management course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop a solid grounding in business process and mechanics, the skills to operate in a global environment and an in-depth understanding of the international marketplace.
This research-informed BSc (Hons) Mathematics degree aims to provide a fundamental education in the fascinating field of mathematics, including pure and applied mathematics. Students have opportunities to work alongside academic staff on challenging projects, which could contribute to academic research or collaboration with industry.
The research-informed MMath Mathematics degree aims to provide a fundamental education in mathematics, including pure and applied mathematics. There will be opportunities for students to develop high-level mathematical and problem-solving skills and to apply these in a variety of contexts. Students will also have the chance to work alongside fellow undergraduates and academic staff on projects.

Tuition Fees

2017/18 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level
£12,800 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2018/19 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level
£13,800 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

In 2018/19, fees for all new and continuing undergraduate UK and EU students will be £9,250.

Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions [www.lincoln.ac.uk/StudentAdmissionsTermsandConditions].