BSc (Hons) Professional Practice

This professionally orientated programme aims to meet the needs of the local health professional population.

The Course

The BSc (Hons) Professional Practice programme, is a professionally orientated programme of study, which has been developed as a ‘top-up’ option following discussions with partners, identifying a need for courses which are responsive to both national and local policy that aims to meet the educational needs of the local health professional population.

The programme aims to provide a degree level qualification from a structured and appropriate post-registration education portfolio consisting of practice focused and research modules. These are aligned with the NHS career framework, which supports the philosophy of Lifelong Learning and clearly links to the NHS Agenda for Change initiative.

The programme is designed to meet the needs of experienced practitioners who wish to broaden their knowledge and understanding of theoretical and policy issues, including research methods and develop their skills to contribute to the changing health and social care system.

The BSc programme consists of courses from the existing LBR portfolio and research focused modules from the BSc (Hons) Nursing with Registered Nurse (Adult). The focus of this programme will be on supporting learning in practice whilst retaining a research element that will provide the opportunity for learners to participate and engage in the academic experience, aiming to ensure that learners are able to apply learned theory to practice.

To apply for this course, please download the application form below:
https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/t4media_2017/doc/BScProfPracticeCourseApplication.docx

Contact hours may vary for each individual module. The composition and delivery for the course breaks down differently for each module and may include lectures, seminars, workshops, independent study, practicals, work placements, research and one-to-one learning.

University-level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

A Comprehensive Approach to History Taking and Physical Assessment (Option)
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A Comprehensive Approach to History Taking and Physical Assessment (Option)

This module aims to introduce the key skills and knowledge required to take a comprehensive history and physical examination of a patient. The emphasis will be on enhancing the practitioner’s ability to interpret complex clinical information, and patient observations and findings, in order to enhance patient care and management.

Students will be encouraged to use appropriate terminology to report deviations from normal in a concise manner to colleagues and the multi-professional team. Students have the chance to engage in critical dialogue and debate surrounding the theories and models of history taking and assessment, as well as the ethical and legal frameworks which govern professional practice.

A Multi Professional Approach to Diabetes Care (Option)
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A Multi Professional Approach to Diabetes Care (Option)

This module is designed to enable students to work effectively with people who have diabetes and their families. The module aims to develop the range of skills and knowledge necessary to deliver services of high quality to people with diabetes mellitus in a full range of health care settings.

Delivering Contemporary Critical Care (Option)
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Delivering Contemporary Critical Care (Option)

This module looks to further expand the concept that the case study methodology enables the nurse to analyse information and develop critical thinking and problem solving skills. It encourages an depth consideration of contemporary issues related to the management of critical illness and to the nurse’s role in implementing care.

The module seeks to further develop skills of investigation, assimilation and dissemination of evidence to promote best practice. The module aims to provide students with insight into effective mentorship and leadership skills and also encourages further consideration of ethical decision making in critical care.

Enhanced Practice in Acute Mental Health Care (L3) (Option)
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Enhanced Practice in Acute Mental Health Care (L3) (Option)

This module has been designed to support practitioners in developing the essential skills and knowledge to manage patients effectively within the acute mental health care setting. The aim of this module is to ensure that practitioners have the capabilities to work within the new context of acute mental health care. Students will be encouraged to challenge their core knowledge and skills in order to deliver high quality patient care in this dynamic and ever changing speciality.

Essential Principles in Palliative and End of Life Care (Option)
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Essential Principles in Palliative and End of Life Care (Option)

The module is based upon the End of Life Pathway described in the National End of Life Strategy (2008). The programme looks to address both the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required for each of the six steps within the pathway; under the overarching themes of providing support for carers and families, communicating information to patients and carers and the provision of spiritual care services.

Foundations in Contemporary Emergency Care Practice (Option)
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Foundations in Contemporary Emergency Care Practice (Option)

This module has been designed to support the development of the essential skills and knowledge required to manage patients effectively within the emergency care setting. Students will be encouraged to challenge their core knowledge and skills in order to deliver high quality holistic patient care in this dynamic and ever changing speciality.

Foundations in Critical Care (Option)
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Foundations in Critical Care (Option)

This module utilises a case study methodology and aims to promote a holistic approach to patient assessment. Students are expected to build on existing knowledge and develop the skills to draw on available evidence to formulate a plan of care based on their findings. This will necessarily include consideration of the psychosocial aspects of care alongside the physical needs.

Students are encouraged to consider local and national directives and initiatives and their impact on the critical care patient and their family. The module looks to introduce students to some principles of effective and sensitive management in relation to the legal, cultural and ethical dilemmas that they are frequently exposed to in the critical care environment.

Within this module students are expected to work with an identified mentor and begin compiling a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate clinical competence and the ability to apply theory to practice.

Independent Study (Nursing) (Core)
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Independent Study (Nursing) (Core)

This module provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to compare and contrast the differing disciplinary approaches and theoretical perspectives they have studied throughout the programme. The aim is to design and conduct a research study related to health professional practice presented in the form of a dissertation that examines critically the relationship between theory and practice. It looks to provide students with the opportunity to illustrate their potential as independent, reflective graduates in nursing.

Integrated Dual Diagnosis Interventions for Mental Health and Problematic Substance Use (Alcohol and/or Drugs) (Option)
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Integrated Dual Diagnosis Interventions for Mental Health and Problematic Substance Use (Alcohol and/or Drugs) (Option)

The aim of this module is provide a generalist level training in effective interventions for dual diagnosis (co-existing mental health and substance misuse, alcohol and/or drug problems). This is designed to enable students to address the physical, psychological and social needs of people with moderate problems around dual diagnosis.

Students will be expected to develop the skills required to be able to deploy targeted interventions that enable them to more effectively address the psychological, physical and social needs of people who have moderate dual diagnosis problems within their own specific practice settings.

Introduction to Cognitive and Behavioural Approaches in Mental Health Care (Option)
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Introduction to Cognitive and Behavioural Approaches in Mental Health Care (Option)

The aim of this module is provide an introductory understanding of cognitive behavioural theory and how this might be applied to practice. The module will emphasise the value of building collaborative relationships with service users, carers and colleagues as the vehicle for delivering effective interventions.

The module aims to enable students to critically interrelate theory and practice. On successful completion of the module students are expected to be able to safely and effectively apply a cognitive behavioural understanding and basic skills to relevant aspects of their practice.

People, Personality and Disorder in Mental Health Care (L3) (Option)
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People, Personality and Disorder in Mental Health Care (L3) (Option)

The aim of this module is provide an understanding of the concept of personality and disorder and to explore ways in which this might be used in everyday encounters with service users. The training will emphasise a whole person approach that also places the service user within the context of their life history and current socio-cultural situation. On successful completion of the module students are expected to be able to safely and effectively apply the framework and basic skills to relevant aspects of their practice.

Practice Certificate in Non Medical Prescribing (Option)
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Practice Certificate in Non Medical Prescribing (Option)

This module is designed to enable practitioners to develop the skills, knowledge and attributes required for safe, appropriate and cost-effective prescribing practice within the context of their specialist professional roles and the legislative and professional frameworks that govern their specific prescribing role.

It involves blended learning strategies to facilitate effective inter-professional learning and the sharing of differing professional perspectives and expertise. Reflective discussions and prescribing analyses are held within each professional group of prescribing students with the aim of enabling students to integrate their learning within the context of their professional practice and to ensure that the requirements of the respective professional and statutory regulatory body are fully addressed.

Research Skills for Evidence-based, Professional Practice for Practitioners (Core)
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Research Skills for Evidence-based, Professional Practice for Practitioners (Core)

This module is designed to enable students to explore and develop a critical appreciation of health care research. It seeks to develop students’ skills in reading, analysing and utilising research, whilst providing an opportunity to explore research methods.

Supporting Learning and Assessment in Practice (Level 6) (Option)
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Supporting Learning and Assessment in Practice (Level 6) (Option)

The module aims to prepare suitably qualified professionals* to undertake the role of mentor within their work place environment. It is the role of the mentor to provide suitable learning opportunities for pre-registration students to achieve clinical competency.

Students must successfully complete this module, providing evidence of their achievement of stage 2 of the NMC Developmental Framework, in order to be entered on to the local mentor register.

*Entry requirements: Applicants must be an NMC Registered Nurse, Midwife, Specialist Community Public Health Nurse (SCPHN) or other registered health care professional with a minimum of 1 year full time or part time equivalent experience.

Therapeutic Interventions for Mental Health Recovery (Level 6) (Option)
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Therapeutic Interventions for Mental Health Recovery (Level 6) (Option)

There is recognition within providers of NHS Services that many mental health practitioners, whilst holding core attitudinal attributes, still require the knowledge, confidence and skills to facilitate therapeutic interventions that deliver tangible change. This module recognises that a wide repertoire of skills both from and outside of a cognitive-behavioural frame needs to be deployed to support mental health recovery.

Work Based Learning (Option)
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Work Based Learning (Option)

The aims of the Work Based Learning module are to enable students to achieve an appropriate level of academic knowledge and understanding, skills and competence relevant to their professional practice. The content of the module is flexible, allowing students the opportunity to develop new learning, to build on existing levels of skills and knowledge. Students have the chance to reflect, explore and critically analyse a relevant area of their practice. Work based learning looks to provide the opportunity to demonstrate the integration of theory into practice and vice versa.

Working with Families and Carers in Mental Health (Option)
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Working with Families and Carers in Mental Health (Option)

This module is designed to provide mental health professionals working in a variety of practice settings with the opportunity to develop the key knowledge and skills to improve health and social outcomes through effectively assessing and addressing the needs of carers and families in mental health care.

The module is built around a recovery ethos and a psychosocial framework. On successful completion of the module students are expected to have a wider appreciation of the effects of caring relationships on both carers and service users. Students are also expected to develop the ability to assess and intervene to meet the needs of carers and families in order to improve health and social outcomes.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way you will be assessed on this course may vary for each module. It could include coursework, such as a dissertation or essay, written and practical exams, portfolio development, group work or presentations to name some examples.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

For each course you may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on your course.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and you will find that our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that you are required to read. However, you may prefer to purchase some of these for yourself and you will be responsible for this cost.

The entry criteria is for all students to have 120 credits at Level One and Two relating to a health professional qualification. It is a modular programme of study which incorporates the University’s credit accumulation and transfer scheme.

To apply for this course please email Kathryn Tindall cpd@lincoln.ac.uk

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.


Your Future Career

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.


Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our students. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

An exciting new development for the School, the Sarah Swift Building, is a £19m investment into a dedicated facility for the Schools of Health and Social Care and Psychology. The building houses high-quality teaching, research, social and learning spaces for both Schools. The building will also include advanced clinical simulation facilities for the School’s nursing courses.

Students also make the most of the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which is home to more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, alongside databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.