BA (Hons) Film Production

The University of Lincoln ranked 8th in the UK for overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2018 (out of 127 institutions).

The Course

BA (Hons) Film Production at Lincoln is taught by multi award-winning industry practitioners and research active academics, and is designed to enable students to learn and develop the necessary skills to become the next generation of innovative filmmakers.

This degree offers students the opportunity to gain extensive experience in all areas of the film production process, working with contemporary industry-standard facilities, equipment and software. Students may have the opportunity to apply for paid work experience for external clients to develop their CV and showreel, and may have the opportunity to learn on professional film sets with industry-active staff.

Dominique Webb is an award-winning and research-active producer who heads up a team that includes director Philip Stevens, who has won international festival award including Best UK Short at Nottingham Film Festival (2017), and BAFTA Scotland New Talent recipient Dr Mikey Murray.

Facilities include video-editing suites with Avid Media Composer, Da Vinci Resolve and Adobe Creative Cloud; audio editing suites with ProTools and Adobe software; digital imaging, design and multi-media suites; a sound dubbing theatre with foley room; a high-end post-production finishing suite with Flame software; a writers' room and production offices.

The first year of this programme introduces students to a range of skills such as directing, producing, screenwriting, cinematography, sound recording and editing. Students can explore filmmaking through a variety of projects in a range of genres, while developing an understanding of film theories.

In the second year, students are expected to explore creative areas in greater depth, enabling them to choose areas of specialism for their final-year films. A variety of theoretical optional modules are available and can develop students’ critical understanding and analytical thinking.

Collaborative filmmaking is a key feature of the course, with students working across the programme to produce work. Throughout the course there is a focus on employability with the degree aiming to prepare graduates for a career in the screen and creative industries.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Film Technologies & Craft Skills (Core)
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Film Technologies & Craft Skills (Core)

This module is an introductory course for the technologies of film production and the key craft skills students will need during their time on the programme.

Screenwriting & Fiction Production (Core)
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Screenwriting & Fiction Production (Core)

This module introduces key skills in screenwriting and short fiction film production.

Advanced Craft Skills - Cinematography (Option)
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Advanced Craft Skills - Cinematography (Option)

An in depth look into the practice, theoretical and technical skills of cinematography. Students will be introduced to the roles of the camera team, lighting team and the grip team. This module will prepare them to undertake the role of Cinematographer in their graduation films.

Advanced Craft Skills - Directing (Option)
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Advanced Craft Skills - Directing (Option)

An advanced module that focuses on the fundamental skills of directing for film.

Advanced Craft Skills - Editing and Post Production for Film (Option)
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Advanced Craft Skills - Editing and Post Production for Film (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to advanced techniques of film editing and creative picture and sound manipulation specifically related to the film production process. The module will introduce students to the craft of film editing from its widest perspectives, gain an understanding of narrative, story arc and story-telling techniques as well as knowledge of editing in various genres through practical exercises.

Advanced Craft Skills - Location and Post-Production Sound for Film (Option)
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Advanced Craft Skills - Location and Post-Production Sound for Film (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to advanced techniques of location sound recording for film production, and creative sound design and editing techniques specifically related to the film production process. The module divides its time between understand location sound recording and the role of the head of sound on a film and television shoot, along with the role of sound editor/sound designer and the sound post-production processes involved at the later stages of completion.

The technologies include location recording or ‘field’ equipment, microphones, recorders and ancillary equipment. Students have the opportunity to develop an understanding of how separate sound is recorded and synchronised to picture before picture editing commences, and work with digital audio workstations and software technologies and the sound ‘dubbing theatre’.

Areas covered include location sound recording for factual and fiction productions, supplying audio files for the editing process, synchronising sound and picture rushes, audio tracklaying using Digital Audio Workstations (DAW’s) recording 'Foley sound', the art of movement re-recording and using props for sound effects creation to picture. ADR (Automated Dialogue Replacement) and 'lip sync' to picture and music production are also covered, including composer spotting sessions and assessing musical requirements.

The roles of mixer, assistant and sound editor are explored, in relation to selecting and assembling sound recordings and different mixes in preparation for final sound production of a television programme, or film. Students have the chance to understand the distinctive role of the location recordist and the relationship between sound recordist, film and television editor and the creative sound post-production process.

Advanced Craft Skills - Post Production Sound for Film (Option)
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Advanced Craft Skills - Post Production Sound for Film (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to advanced techniques of creative sound design and audio editing techniques specifically related to the film production process. The module divides its time between how a film editor deals with the sound components of a film during the editing process, and the role of sound editor/sound designer and the sound post-production processes which occur at the later stages of completion.

Students can develop and understanding of how separate sound is recorded and synchronised to picture before picture editing commences, and work with digital audio workstations and software technologies and the sound ‘dubbing theatre’.

Areas covered include, using sound during the edit, sound editing for factual and fiction productions, supplying audio files for the editing process, synchronising sound and picture rushes, audio tracklaying using Digital Audio Workstations (DAW’s) recording 'Foley sound', (the art of movement re-recording and using props for sound effects creation to picture), ADR (Automated Dialogue Replacement) and 'lip sync' to picture and music production are also covered, including composer spotting sessions and assessing musical requirements.

The roles of mixer, assistant and sound editor are explored, in relation to selecting and assembling sound recordings and different mixes in preparation for final sound production of a television programme, or film. Students can understand the distinctive relationship between location sound recordist, film and television editor and the creative sound post-production process. Upon completion students are expected to be well equipped to work with sound during a film edit session and enhance soundtracks with post-production skills.

Advanced Craft Skills - Producing (Option)
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Advanced Craft Skills - Producing (Option)

The module allows students to understand and develop the skills required to work towards becoming and industry ready film producer.

Advanced Craft Skills - Screenwriting (Option)
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Advanced Craft Skills - Screenwriting (Option)

This module is an advanced level module in the practical screenplay craft. Students will produce and pitch finished short screenplays and begin to explore the conventions of the feature film screenplay.

Children’s Film and Television (Option)
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Children’s Film and Television (Option)

This module investigates and analyses the debates about and developments in children’s film and television, largely in the UK but drawing on the USA, for elements of comparison informed by politics, ideology and economics.

Documentary Now (Option)
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Documentary Now (Option)

This module explores the history and theory of the documentary film. It will introduce students to media texts (films, video, broadcast television and digital platforms) that claim, in distinction to the cinema of fiction, to capture and re-present unmediated – to one degree or another-- reality. Students on this module will be asked to consider, via close text analysis and an understanding of moving image history, the problematics of making such a claim. This will involve students investigating the nature of the documentary image – that is: the relationship of the signifier to the thing signified. It will require them to determine the ethical implications of documentary’s claim on the real for the filmmaker, the persons filmed and the spectators. It will engage them in debates about documentary’s impact in the social sphere. The module will be organised around a series of case studies. Students will gain an understanding of media texts that have had a significant impact on society, knowledge of history and theory of documentary, and skills in close text reading and historical reception studies.

East Asian Cinemas (Option)
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East Asian Cinemas (Option)

A guide to specific films and accompanying theoretical concepts. Key films provide a platform for debating the political, institutional and cultural context of individual cinemas and regions in an increasingly globalised industry where audiences and producers are exposed to a variety of film styles. Critical engagement and debate are encouraged within the broader structure of World Cinema, alongside cultural and globalisation studies.

Hollywood Musical (Option)
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Hollywood Musical (Option)

This module will look at the history and development of the Hollywood musical as one of Hollywood’s most popular and important film genres, from its beginnings in the early sound era to the integrated musical of the 1940s and 1950s to cult films like The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) and more recent successes such as Moulin Rouge (2001), High School Musical 3: Senior Year (2008), Mamma Mia! (2008) and La La Land (2016).

Students can watch together a number of significant films and will have the opportunity to discuss structural, stylistic and thematic issues in the context of scholarly literature. Stardom and the function of the star performance will be considered and we will explore the musical’s representation of cultural issues in a variety of contexts such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality and gender.

Realism in Narrative Fiction (Option)
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Realism in Narrative Fiction (Option)

This module aims to develop an understanding of the complex problem of realism in film and media studies as it relates to fictional narrative forms. Students will have the opportunity to engage with academic debates around realist texts and examine these in relation to historical, contemporary and potential examples.

Representing Difference (Option)
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Representing Difference (Option)

Methods of analysis of media representations and approaches to representing difference will be considered in this module as well as issues such as class, gender, nationality and 'race,' ethnicity, sexuality and (dis)ability apparent in film & broadcast media. A range of critical approaches will be considered.

The Art & Craft of Film Practice (Core)
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The Art & Craft of Film Practice (Core)

This module will give students an advanced theoretical understanding of the craft skills employed in film production through observation and analysis of the work of pioneering filmmakers.

Art Cinemas (Option)
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Art Cinemas (Option)

Art Cinemas will focus on moving-image practice at the intersection of art and media. Work studied will range from early film experiments to contemporary gallery-based video. Teaching will be a mixture of lectures, screenings and seminars with a trip organised to a relevant exhibition where possible. Students will be assessed by essay and a curatorial assignment, helping them develop practical skills in presenting such work in a public context.

Graduation Project (Core)
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Graduation Project (Core)

This module marks the culmination of three years of practical development through production work. Students will either collaborate on substantial short film products in a clearly defined head of department role or write a feature length film screenplay.

Graduation Project and Thesis Development (Core)
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Graduation Project and Thesis Development (Core)

This module aims to prepare students for their Graduation Project and develops the skills required for writing their Practice-Led Thesis.

Practice-Led Thesis (Core)
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Practice-Led Thesis (Core)

This module provides students with a unique opportunity to engage in practice as research alongside their graduation project. It forms the final output of the student for graduation and will take the form of a written thesis that reflects on their artefacts from both a theoretical and contextual perspective.

Science Fiction in Film and Television (Option)
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Science Fiction in Film and Television (Option)

This module analyses the range and diversity of a genre encompassing many highly popular texts. Metaphor and allegory are explored to understand how science fiction has been appreciated and has developed from cult to mainstream acceptance and popularity. Innovation and cross-fertilisation of generic forms are also be considered.

Showreel / Portfolio Project (Core)
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Showreel / Portfolio Project (Core)

Artefact creation led, this module is unique in allowing students to choose the style and content of their outputs. Particular emphasis is also placed on peer review in the assessment.

The New Hollywood 1967 - 1983: from The Graduate to Star Wars and beyond... (Option)
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The New Hollywood 1967 - 1983: from The Graduate to Star Wars and beyond... (Option)

This module surveys and assesses a period that represents a break with a range of ideological, aesthetic and commercial traditions together with a process of retrenchment and recuperation. Post-classical Hollywood saw both films and the industry experience ideological and socio-cultural upheaval, demonstrated through cinematic modes of representation, industrial re-structuring and artistic transformations.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

There is a full range of quality portable equipment available to students for filming and recording on location, and students currently have free access to Adobe Creative Cloud for the duration of their studies.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above will be required.

Applicants will also be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (or the equivalent), including English.

We will also consider applicants with extensive relevant work experience.

International Students will require English Language at IELTS 7.0 with no less than 6.5 in each element, or equivalent.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Dominique Webb and Dr Mikey Murray

Programme Leaders

Dominique Webb is a film producer/director. She has experience in the commercial film industry and continues to work in the independent sector, producing award-winning films in a range of genres. Dominique has strong links with the screen industries, is a tutor for the BFI Academy and a Fellow of the HEA. Mikey Murray is a freelance filmmaker and BAFTA Scotland New Talent Award recipient. His film Natalie recently had its world premiere at the Edinburgh International Film Festival. Mikey is the creator and festival director for the Indie-Lincs International Film Festival.


Your Future Career

Film Production graduates may choose to pursue a wide range of careers in the film and media industries, such as working at production companies, freelance craft specialists or creative media start-up businesses. Students may choose to continue their studies at postgraduate level or take a qualification in teaching.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.


Facilities

Students are based in the Media, Humanities and Technology building in the heart of the University campus. Lectures and screenings are held in teaching spaces with high end projection equipment, such as the Stephen Langton Theatre. Practical work is undertaken in our award-winning Media and Broadcast Production Centre, a specialist production environment with television studios, video and audio editing suites, digital imaging, design and multimedia suites.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

As a student at Lincoln we know you will want an excellently resourced, comfortable and well-designed library. We offer this in the stunning Great Central Warehouse Library, with resources including more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library is open 24/7 for the majority of the academic year.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.