BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage

BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage

92% of BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage* students at Lincoln agreed that staff were good at explaining things and that they made the subject interesting according to the National Student Survey 2018. *formerly BA (Hons) Conservation and Restoration.

The Course

The BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage degree offers opportunities to gain extensive, hands-on experience working on a range of historic materials provided by museums, historic houses and private collections. Students can become familiar with different materials, time periods and collections, within their historical context.

The course links the theory and practice of conservation. Students navigate decision-making and ethics through independent research and the guidance of tutors. Throughout the course, students can carry out conservation treatments and scientific analysis of historical artefacts. Starting with simple objects in the first year and increasing in complexity as skills and knowledge are built, the practical aspect culminates in an exhibition of work at the end of the final year.

The second term of year two offers students the opportunity to study at a partner institution, choose from a range of optional modules, or undertake an extended work placement. Students have the opportunity to source their own placement in a historic property, museum or private workshop in the UK or overseas.

The Course

The BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage degree offers opportunities to gain extensive, hands-on experience working on a range of historic materials provided by museums, historic houses and private collections. Students can become familiar with different materials, time periods and collections, within their historical context.

The course links the theory and practice of conservation. Students navigate decision-making and ethics through independent research and the guidance of tutors.

Throughout the course, students can carry out conservation treatments and scientific analysis of historical artefacts. Starting with simple objects in the first year and increasing in complexity as skills and knowledge are built, the practical aspect culminates in an exhibition of work at the end of the final year.

The second term of year two offers students the opportunity to study at a partner institution, choose from a range of optional modules, or undertake an extended work placement. Students have the opportunity to source their own placement in a historic property, museum or private workshop in the UK or overseas.

The course is delivered through workshop, studio and laboratory sessions, lectures, demonstrations and seminars. After an initial introduction to conservation skills, materials and techniques, all practical work is on historic objects from museums and private collections.

An assessed vocational placement forms a major component of the course and live projects based in museums and historic houses are used in various aspects of the learning process. The costs of this are outlined in the Features tab and the Fees tab.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Applied Practical Skills (Core)
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Applied Practical Skills (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to generic practical skills used in the treatment of historic objects. It provides a foundation to future work, although at the early stages the students work on exercises and simulations, prior to being allocated their first object.

Students can develop awareness of the practices and procedures common to areas of conservation treatment including laboratory and bench skills, documentation skills and basic decision-making skills.

Becoming a Professional (Core)
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Becoming a Professional (Core)

The module supports students in planning and preparing for their professional life by providing a framework to successfully navigate their way through university study, including progression to postgraduate level, and from this springboard to their chosen professional destination. It is intended to provide students with the knowledge, skills and insights into how to manage the transitions into university and from there into the professional world.

Conservation Processes (Core)
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Conservation Processes (Core)

In this module students have the chance to learn the theory and application of basic conservation principles related to observation, documentation, condition assessment and cleaning of historic objects; adhesives, consolidants, modelling and casting.

Conservation Science 1 (Core)
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Conservation Science 1 (Core)

This module is designed to introduce students to basic chemistry concepts, and the scientific study of materials commonly found in cultural heritage. Students may develop a systematic approach to scientific investigation and examination of historic objects and an understanding to the nature of different materials, technological factors and the processes of deterioration.

Conservation Theory (Core)
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Conservation Theory (Core)

This module aims to provide the underpinning basic theoretical knowledge related to historic materials, on which the discipline of conservation is based. Students are introduced to a range of conservation techniques, through lectures discussing a range of different material types and their potential deterioration.

Documentation techniques (Core)
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Documentation techniques (Core)

This module provides an introduction to the recording skills necessary for a practising conservator. Various forms of documentation encountered in the practice of conservation are introduced, and drawing and photography recordings skills developed. Students can be introduced to the basic principles of photography, lighting techniques and their application in conservation. The conventions and standard representations used in record drawing are also introduced.

Introduction to Visual and Material Culture (Core)
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Introduction to Visual and Material Culture (Core)

This module is designed as an introduction to visual and material culture, embracing the history of art and architecture, historical archaeology, and the conservation of historical buildings. It aims to enable students to interrogate visual and material objects throughout the past and to understand their functions and possible meanings of visual and material objects as primary sources.

Accessing Ordinary Lives: Interpreting and Understanding Voices from the Past, 1880 – present (Option)
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Accessing Ordinary Lives: Interpreting and Understanding Voices from the Past, 1880 – present (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to resurrect and understand the ordinary lives of people like themselves and their forebears from the sources available to us. The course picks up on both well-established and recent trends in historical research that have sought to give voice to ordinary people and promote from the historical records the lives of marginalised people such as homosexuals, women, children, the working classes, ethnic minorities alongside more familiar narratives of the great and the good.

Applied Practical Conservation 2 (Core)
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Applied Practical Conservation 2 (Core)

This module aims to develop the basic skills introduced in year one and apply them to the conservation of objects related to a range of material types. Theoretical concepts introduced in Year 1 can be developed and underpin students’ practice.

The module offers the chance to develop important transferable skills for understanding of the behaviour of materials and manual dexterity. It also looks to reinforce and develop students' skills in conservation report-writing.

Archaeology (Option)
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Archaeology (Option)

Archaeologists record, excavate and analyse the material evidence of our past to illuminate aspects of human life not otherwise recorded. In this module students will have the opportunity to take part in an excavation and will learn how to collect, interpret and care for archaeological evidence.

Britons and Romans, 100 BC-AD 450 (Option)
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Britons and Romans, 100 BC-AD 450 (Option)

This course will examine how and why the culture of Britain changed in the period of increasing contact with, and eventual incorporation into, the Roman Empire. Examining the key material, behavioural, ideological, and structural changes to society in the period c. 100 BC to AD 450, it will question to what degree each aspect was a wholesale incorporation of ‘foreign’ ideas, technologies, and goods, a local interpretation and adoption of these importations into an existing social system, or a local creation that was distinctly Romano-British, if often termed ‘Roman’.

Conservation Placement (Option)
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Conservation Placement (Option)

This module focuses around a 12 week period of placement in a museum, historic house or private workshop. Students are responsible for negotiating the placement arrangement with support and guidance from their placement tutor. Students are encouraged to select a placement to suit their individual aspirations and needs. This concludes with a presentation, which is designed to allow all group members to benefit from the experience of their peers.

Conservation Science 2: Analytical Techniques (Core)
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Conservation Science 2: Analytical Techniques (Core)

This module aims to further develop knowledge of materials science and its relevance to conservation. Students have the chance to develop skills in the use of scientific analytical techniques for the examination and identification of materials encountered in historic objects and their treatment.

Digital Heritage (Option)
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Digital Heritage (Option)

The cultural heritage sector increasingly offers opportunities for application of these rapidly developing digital technologies, as a communication, research and recording tool. This module offers the opportunity for students to become familiar with some of these advanced recording techniques for the study and recording of objects.

Disease, Health, and the Body in Early Modern Europe (Option)
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Disease, Health, and the Body in Early Modern Europe (Option)

This module examines how physicians, other practitioners, and the public understood the body, disease, and health in the early modern period. Although the medical system of Galen (2nd century AD) and humoral medicine guided Western medicine until the 1800s, between 1500-1700 there were major challenges to this traditional system. The work of elites such as Paracelsus and Van Helmont (chemical medicine), Vesalius (anatomy), Harvey (circulation and respiratory physiology) will be placed in a greater religious, social, and cultural context.

Early Modern Family: Households in England c.1500-1750 (Option)
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Early Modern Family: Households in England c.1500-1750 (Option)

The module looks at a number of ways in which historians have studied the family in Britain between c.1500 and 1800. It will examine a range of historical approaches from the demographic to the more qualitative and anthropological. Close attention is paid to the problems historians of the pre-industrial family confront in their examination of the surviving primary sources.

Education and the State in Post-War England (Option)
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Education and the State in Post-War England (Option)

This module aims to develop the skills of critical analysis and source interrogation by exploring the relationship between the State, at its central and local levels and the provision of education in England, with particular emphasis on developments since 1945.

Experiencing and Remembering Civil War in Britain (Option)
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Experiencing and Remembering Civil War in Britain (Option)

The civil wars that raged across England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland in the mid-seventeenth century were among the most turbulent and exhilarating times in British history. This module explores the diverse ways in which the wars were explained, experienced and remembered by those who lived through them. Students can consider the extent to which this period, often described as one of 'revolution', left a lasting impression on British society, culture, religion and politics.

Fighting for Peace? Politics, Society and War in the Modern Era (Option)
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Fighting for Peace? Politics, Society and War in the Modern Era (Option)

The modern period has often been understood as a time when peace was considered the natural state of societies, where states and non-governmental groups have been concerned with achieving a lasting peace and avoiding repetitions of bloody conflict. Wars, however, have not become a thing of the past, and today we live in a condition of seemingly permanent war where civilians are often the primary targets. This module will look at how ideas and practices of war have altered in the last few hundred years, and how these notions have been contested and challenged. The module asks where these ideas came from, and how concepts of war and peace, and violence and non-violence have been reframed in various ways. The course is focussed on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and moves chronologically from the Napoleonic wars, to contemporary conflicts through a series of case studies that cover wars, diplomacy, the aftermath of wars, and peace movements. Each case study will draw on key themes which run throughout the module, including pacifism, militarism, imperialism, culture, race, gender and nationalism.

From ‘Bright Young Things’ to Brexit: British media and society since 1919 (Option)
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From ‘Bright Young Things’ to Brexit: British media and society since 1919 (Option)

This module examines British media and society in Britain from the end of World War I, through World War II, and into the uncertain waters of the postwar period and the 21st century. A range of domestic and international factors that shaped modern Britain will be investigated throughout the module, including the interwar slump, World War II, decolonisation, increased immigration, the ‘decline’ of the welfare state, the ‘Troubles’ in Ireland, the election of Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister, and Britain’s unsteady relationship with Europe. These events not only shaped Britain itself but also occurred in dialogue with the increasingly powerful role of media in the 20th and 21st centuries. This module will bring specific attention to the ways in which the press, cinema, radio, television, music, and also the web reflected, engaged with, and sometimes shaped popular understandings of society, culture, and politics in the period. We will examine this history of media in conjunction with a history of British society in order to investigate claims by historians that a ‘democratic culture’ emerged in 20th century Britain.

Gender and Sexuality in Britain 1700-1950 (Option)
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Gender and Sexuality in Britain 1700-1950 (Option)

This module will interrogate aspects of the history of gender and sexuality in Britain over a 250-year span, coinciding with the arrival of ‘modernity’. It will introduce students to debates over the relationship between gender, sexuality, and structural changes in society, economy and politics, as well as thinking about gender and sexuality as discourse and subjectivity. Further, it will introduce students to a wide range of source material for the social and cultural history of early modern and modern Britain and seek to develop their confidence in using such diverse sources skillfully.

The module takes a thematic approach, although within each theme, specific chronological examples will be examined. Thus continuity and change can be highlighted, and it is intended to resist a narrative of progress towards ‘modern’ liberal views of gender and sexuality. However, a clear chronological framework will also be developed through examples which will help students gain a clear understanding of context.

Grand Expectations? America during the Cold War (Option)
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Grand Expectations? America during the Cold War (Option)

The United States emerged from the Second World War a superpower, with, to an extent, a belief that it could remake the world. The challenges of the Cold War years were to demonstrate how limited was that power. This module explores the key social, political, economic and cultural developments in the United States between 1945 and 1990.

Hell and Damnation, life and afterlife: cultures of belief in England c.1550-1750 (Option)
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Hell and Damnation, life and afterlife: cultures of belief in England c.1550-1750 (Option)

This module examines the changing attitudes to life and the afterlife in England, and their cultural representation, in the two centuries after the Protestant Reformation. Examining the expansion in a number of rival religious and political groups, it considers the importance placing these within a social, cultural and economic, as well as theological, context. The module will focus on a range of religious groups considered to be a threat to the established church, or who have been identified by scholars as particularly significant in the period.

History and Literature in the C18th and C19th (Option)
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History and Literature in the C18th and C19th (Option)

Works of fiction are not just a source of entertainment. They are a crucial and exciting route into understanding the past. Novels, short stories and poems allow us to understand how debates and ideas about society and identity circulated and how writers attempted to reinforce or change the way that readers looked at the world. This module will examine how a wide range of fiction produced in Britain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries addressed the key themes of class, politics and gender. Students will have the opportunity to examine the treatment of these concepts in genres as varied as crime fiction, popular romance, children’s literature, science fiction, war writing and feminist fiction.

Imperial Cities of the Early Modern World. (Option)
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Imperial Cities of the Early Modern World. (Option)

One of the ways in which early modern monarchs and rulers legitimised their authority and projected their power was through architecture and urban design. In this period capital cities across Europe, America and Asia were embellished with architecture and urban design inspired by Renaissance ideals of social order. This module examines the ways rulers imagined and built imperial a number of capital cities across Europe, America and Asia.

Italy, a Contested Nation. Social and political conflicts from Garibaldi to Berlusconi (Option)
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Italy, a Contested Nation. Social and political conflicts from Garibaldi to Berlusconi (Option)

Italy is a highly-politicised and ideologically-divided country. Divisions and internal conflicts, which have reached dramatic peaks, are a permanent feature in Italian history. They mirror unsolved social and political contradictions that many historians consider to be the result of the process of the Italian Risorgimento. National unification was prompted by republicans, but it was the Monarchy that achieved it.

Madness and the Asylum in Modern Britain (Option)
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Madness and the Asylum in Modern Britain (Option)

This module explores the relationship between madness and British society from the late eighteenth century to the present day. Students can examine how institutional approaches to the treatment of insanity have changed, from the eighteenth-century madhouse, to the Victorian asylum, to care in the community in the twentieth century. They will assess changing medical, legal and lay responses to insanity, including the role that class, gender, family and community played in defining insanity and its treatment.

Material Histories: Objects and Analysis (Option)
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Material Histories: Objects and Analysis (Option)

This module will give students a unique opportunity to develop their practical skills for studying objects while developing their understanding of the relationship between history and material culture. Students can explore how object-based study can enhance their practice as conservators and historians and how material culture studies can lead to insights that cannot be reached through other approaches.

Media, Controversy and Moral Panic (Option)
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Media, Controversy and Moral Panic (Option)

This module explores the history of media controversy and ‘moral panic’ during the twentieth century. It is designed to introduce students to media texts (especially films and television programmes) that have sparked debate and extreme differences of opinion among audiences in Britain and America. Students will be expected to engage with a range of films, television programmes and primary source material, which may include newspapers and television news broadcasts from the Media Archive of Central England (MACE).

Medicine, Sexuality and Modernity (Option)
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Medicine, Sexuality and Modernity (Option)

This is a general introductory module on the history of medicine and sexuality from 1850 to 2000. It aims to give an overview of some of the major themes within the modern history of medicine and sexuality. It focuses on how our understanding of the human body, reproduction and sexuality in a socio-cultural and political context evolved from the advent of evolutionary thought to present day debates about enhancement and reproductive medicine. Sexual behaviour and reproduction became major concerns in medicine and politics in the modern period. Sexuality became an object of scientific enquiry and governments developed new policies to regulate sexual behaviour. This module will give students an excellent grounding in modern and contemporary history that will complement further modules at level 2 and 3 that deal with sexuality, gender, race, science and medicine.

Medieval Man and the Supernatural c. 1200-1500 (Option)
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Medieval Man and the Supernatural c. 1200-1500 (Option)

Miracles and magic; werewolves, vampires, priests and witches; church services and rituals. All of these formed a part of the belief system of medieval men and women between 1200 and 1500. This module uses original primary sources ranging from ghost stories to confessions of wizards to formal trials of heretics to look at what people believed, how we need to think about those beliefs today and what they tell us about Western European medieval society.

People on the move: migration, identity and mobility in the modern world (Option)
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People on the move: migration, identity and mobility in the modern world (Option)

People have migrated as long as the human race has existed and this module places this fundamental aspect of human experience at its heart. Issues surrounding migration and the movement of peoples are central to contemporary politics and society, as the management of people seeking refuge and better prospects preoccupies governments around the world. This situation makes ever more urgent our need to understand the history of migration and how it has shaped cultures across time and space. People on the move focuses upon the movement of people at particular points in modern history, considering the forces that propel people to risk their own lives and possibly those of their families, uproot from home and enter the potentially perilous and peripatetic life of a migrant. We will discuss the prospects and challenges of migration, and subsequently how diasporic cultures develop and the benefits and tensions surrounding integration. We will consider what happens when communities come into contact due to migration and the subsequent influences upon culture, religion, politics and identity. Through a series of in-depth case studies from the modern period, from the forced movement of the colonial era to twentieth century migration across the Atlantic, we will encounter a variety of geographical regions and processes of migration. A variety of historical sources will be interrogated to access the stories of migrants and about migrants, including texts (such legal and government documents, letters, memoirs and oral histories), images, objects and architecture. Addressing themes such as empire, economics, identity and religion in different contexts allows us to make meaningful comparisons between migrations across time and space.

Power and the Presidency in the United States (Option)
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Power and the Presidency in the United States (Option)

This module introduces students to history of the US presidency by investigating selected past presidents from Washington to Trump. By reading and analysing the biographies of various presidents, key historical discussions as well as primary sources, including presidential addresses, campaign speeches, policy documents, and internal White House documents, and media accounts, students will be able to discuss and evaluate the major themes associated with the Office of the President.

The main question students will be asked to engage with through this course is “what makes an effective president?” In answering this question students will discuss themes ranging from the establishment of the office during the American Revolution, the ability of presidents to pass civil rights reform, the rise and fall of the imperial presidency, the decline and restoration of presidential influence, hidden illness in the oval office, the growth of partisanship, the impact of the media and presidential communication strategies, and the changing presidential electorate. By exploring these themes as well as the achievements, scandals and the legacies of various presidents, students will be able to determine how individual presidents have coped with the pressures of the office and what influence they have exerted on the office.

Preventive Conservation (Core)
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Preventive Conservation (Core)

This module looks to provide an introduction to the preventive conservation skills needed to set out as a practicing conservator. Students have the chance to develop an understanding of practical preventive conservation and collections management procedures, and can gain experience in environmental monitoring and surveying. Topics such as integrated pest management and emergency planning are also discussed.

Queenship in Britain: Gender, Politics and Power (Option)
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Queenship in Britain: Gender, Politics and Power (Option)

Queenly figures are a mainstay of popular history. Propelled by innumerable representations ranging from the laudatory hagiographical sketches of the prolific Strickland sisters in the 19th century to the popular fictions of authors such as Philippa Gregory, Queens have become the best recognised of historical figures. Queens have also been invoked for more political reasons over the centuries such as in the works of Christine de Pizan, Cecily Hamilton and more recently Caryl Churchill as examples of powerful women in bids to challenge gendered inequalities in the authors’ own centuries. But how much do we actually understand about what it meant to be a Queen, especially in an era when all political power was gendered as male? This module encourages students to consider this question. Opening with an exploration of different historical interpretations and presentations of Queenship it then uses a series of case studies to explore the different ways in which Queenship was constructed and deployed in particular historical eras.

Salvation and Damnation, 600-1750 (Option)
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Salvation and Damnation, 600-1750 (Option)

Concern with, and ideas about, the supernatural influenced all areas of life for medieval and early modern men and women, and cut across all levels of society. In an age where religion was a state concern, many of these concerns were articulated or shaped within the context of the Church, all across Western Europe, yet throughout our period religious life was characterised by its great diversity. This module examines changing religious practices and beliefs in Europe, although with a particular focus on England, from the early Middle Ages until the seventeenth century, charting continuity and change in people’s thinking about their relationship – both individually and collectively - with the divine. The module is divided into three blocks: (1) early medieval, in which we explore the adoption of Christianity as a state religion, the slow emergence of an institutional church, missionary and conversion activities, and campaigns against heresy; (2) high to late medieval where we examine the tension between the theology of the church and the beliefs of the individual in a time of increased attempts at centralisation by the Western Church; (3) early modern, from the Reformation, via the Civil War, to early eighteenth-century rational religion and alternative versions of spirituality, and their impact on attitudes to religious and other minority groups.

Scrambling for Africa? Cultures of Empire and Resistance in East Africa, 1850-1965 (Option)
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Scrambling for Africa? Cultures of Empire and Resistance in East Africa, 1850-1965 (Option)

East Africa became a significant theatre of empire from the mid-nineteenth century, when David Livingstone championed European intervention to bring ‘Christianity, commerce and civilisation’ to the region. This module will explore the expansion of the British Empire into East Africa from the late nineteenth-century era of ‘high imperialism’ until decolonisation in the 1960s. This region provides rich opportunities to deepen an understanding of imperialism and offers key themes in the history of empire, including exploration, slavery, race, identity, gender, imperial networks, cultural representation and indigenous agency.

Struggles for Equality in Twentieth Century Europe (Option)
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Struggles for Equality in Twentieth Century Europe (Option)

This module explores through various case-studies how people struggled for equality and social justice over the last century and asks why inequality has risen over the last three decades. Starting from attempts to reshape societies at the end of the First World War and the Russian Revolutions, the module examines how reformist and revolutionary strategies opposed each other during the inter-war years, how fascist movements tried to contain attempts at change and what solutions they proposed to the question of inequality.

Study at a partner institution: Conservation (Option)
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Study at a partner institution: Conservation (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for Conservation students to spend a term studying at one of the University’s partner institutions. This opportunity has both academic and personal development dimensions. Study at another institution offers enhanced sporting, cultural and other activities to enhance students' overall profile, alongside the basic experience of adapting to and working effectively within a different academic culture. Please note that a limited number of places will be available each year.

The Age of Improvement: the Atlantic World in the long eighteenth century (Option)
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The Age of Improvement: the Atlantic World in the long eighteenth century (Option)

The period from 1700 to 1850 was one of transition and change in the British Isles and North America, marking an ideological and material shift away from the legacy of medieval Europe and the period of initial colonial contact. This module challenges students to engage with historical, cartographical, and material evidence. Students are introduced to the landscapes, streetscapes, and social make-up of the long eighteenth century, and can discuss in seminars how broad events impacted everyday lives, the urban, and rural landscape.

The Birth of the Modern Age? British Politics, 1885-1914 (Option)
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The Birth of the Modern Age? British Politics, 1885-1914 (Option)

This module tests the claim that the period from the 1880s to the First World War was an ‘Age of Transition’, which witnessed the birth of modern British politics. Through an analysis of this argument, students are introduced to some of the major developments in British political history in the period 1885-1914, including the birth of the welfare state, the creation of the Labour Party, the conflict over ‘Votes for Women’ and British foreign policy before World War One.

The Emperor in the Roman World (Option)
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The Emperor in the Roman World (Option)

This module surveys the history of the Roman Empire not as a succession of emperors and achievements, victories and defeats, but as a complex of experiments in government and of attitudes to governance. Beginning with the transition from representative republican rule to the domination of an imperial dynasty and its network of élite dependants in the early first century, and concluding with the incipient takeover of this system by a newly Christianised ruling class in the early fourth century, students can explore the role of the emperor in the Roman world and the patterns of communication between him and his subjects.

The Forgotten Revolution? The Emergence of Feudal Europe (Option)
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The Forgotten Revolution? The Emergence of Feudal Europe (Option)

Almost all historians share the view that the social, economic and political structures of Europe in 1000 A.D. were significantly different to those that characterised the western superpower of Late Antiquity, the Roman Empire. In this challenging module, students will be encouraged to engage with a range of source material that will allow them to come to their own conclusions. Given this wide focus, students will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the fascinating story of post-Carolingian Europe in such a way that they enhance their abilities to think comparatively, a crucial weapon in the historian’s armoury.

The Rise of Islam: Religion, culture and war in the Middle East (Option)
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The Rise of Islam: Religion, culture and war in the Middle East (Option)

The victories of Arab armies over the forces of the Byzantine and Persian Empires in the seventh century were of monumental importance. Not only did they signal the decline of the two great superpowers of the late ancient world but they were accompanied, some scholars would argue caused, by the rise of a new monotheistic world religion: Islam. The first half of the module seeks to understand the conquests of the Arab armies and the emergence of Islam historically and culturally, in two specific contexts: (1) political conflict between the Persian and Byzantine Empires, during which Arabia often acted as a military frontier and different Arab groups as allies to one side or another; (2) contact and competition between Christianity, Judaism and other religious traditions in Arabia. The second half of the module explores how, after the initial victories over the Byzantine and Persian Empires, the new Islamic polity renewed itself, rolled forward further conquests, and focuses in particular on how an ‘Islamic’ culture was formed.

The World of Late Antiquity, 150-750 (Option)
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The World of Late Antiquity, 150-750 (Option)

This module aims to develop students' understanding of the political, social and cultural history of Late Antiquity (150-750), with a particular focus on two world-changing religious developments: the rise of Christianity and Islam. Although the geographical focus of our studies will be on eastern Mediterranean lands of an empire ruled from Constantinople, known to later scholars as the Byzantine Empire, the geographical range of the module will be extremely wide (western Europe, including the western Mediterranean, Persia, Arabia, and ‘barbarian’ territories beyond the Roman frontiers on the Rhine and Danube).

Themes in American Cultural History (Option)
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Themes in American Cultural History (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to some of the key interdisciplinary themes in American cultural history in the first half of the twentieth century as well as to theoretical works that have shaped American cultural studies since the 1950s. The module will investigate and evaluate academic argument relating to the study of American cultural history from a variety of theoretical, philosophical and methodological perspectives including feminism, social theory, post-structuralism, and postmodernism.

Understanding Exhibitions: History on Display (Option)
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Understanding Exhibitions: History on Display (Option)

This module will introduce students to the principles of understanding, evaluating and constructing exhibitions. It will focus on exhibiting in art, history and archaeology and will include both theoretical approaches to the understanding and critique of exhibitions and practical aspects of mounting an exhibition. The module will include visiting museums, galleries and other exhibition spaces to examine and analyse exhibitions in situ, as well as talks from museum professionals on aspects of exhibition development. Students will be assessed through the production of plans for a small temporary exhibition they develop individually.

Understanding Practical Making (Option)
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Understanding Practical Making (Option)

This module is designed to introduce the basic skills of working with glass, ceramic and fine metalwork. It provides an opportunity to investigate the potential and limitations of working with various materials, processes and techniques, associated with the practice of object manufacture against a relevant historical background.

Urban Life and Society in the Middle Ages (Option)
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Urban Life and Society in the Middle Ages (Option)

Between the 11th and the 12th centuries Europe went through some radical changes. This module will focus on case studies, such as Lincoln, London and Paris, among others. Students will have the opportunity to study how and why such centres grew from small towns to some of the greatest and most vibrant metropolis of Western Europe in the Middle Ages. For a comparative study, a range of primary sources will be taken into account, including contemporary descriptions of these cities and their inhabitants, historical records, art and architecture.

Village detectives: Unearthing new histories (Option)
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Village detectives: Unearthing new histories (Option)

The typical image of a rural village, whether a chocolate box idyll prettily nestled around its church or a commuter dormitory boringly empty of anything fun to do, rarely shows much evidence for anything dramatic, but these places were created by people who lived through events which are almost unimaginable to us today including the Norman Conquest and the Black Death, and for whom a perpetual challenge was simply surviving in a period where barely half of those born lived to adulthood. In this module students will have the opportunity to learn how to critically analyse and interpret historical and archaeological evidence and to use their knowledge and skills to write a new history of any rural settlement of their choice.

World Heritage Management (Option)
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World Heritage Management (Option)

This module is designed to explore ideas of heritage protection, management and conservation from around the world. It will consider United Nations' efforts in the field and consider how this international perspective shapes local and national actions.

Applied Practical Conservation 3.1 (Core)
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Applied Practical Conservation 3.1 (Core)

This module allows students the opportunity to specialise in a specific material discipline, or alternatively to continue to pursue broader options. Students are encouraged to consider their choice of specialism for this module in line with their choice of dissertation and placement.

Applied Practical Conservation 3.2 (Core)
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Applied Practical Conservation 3.2 (Core)

This is a practical module covering the conservation treatment of one or more complex historic objects. Exact content will depend on object type chosen. This module allows students to choose to specialise in a specific material discipline, or alternatively to continue to pursue broader options.

Applied Preventive Conservation (Core)
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Applied Preventive Conservation (Core)

The module is designed to extend students' knowledge and awareness of preventive conservation skills. Students can carry out live projects in environmental monitoring, surveying collections and pest management in order to further their experience in these areas, in addition to examining how external factors such as buildings and pollutants can impact on collections care.

Conservation exhibition (Core)
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Conservation exhibition (Core)

This module covers the production of an exhibition of conservation work completed by students. Initial sessions discuss the theory of exhibition design and managing projects, before moving on to the detail of the exhibition itself. Students will be expected to manage all aspects of the exhibition, including curation, marketing and fundraising if applicable.

Conservation independent study: dissertation (Core)
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Conservation independent study: dissertation (Core)

The module allows students to undertake a major research project in an area of their own choice (approx. 10,000 words).

The student is allocated a dissertation tutor following their decision on the topic to be researched. The initial stage of planning involves the student confirming a working title and agreeing the structure to their work. Regular tutorials with the dissertation tutor will aid the students’ progress and time management.

The research should address clear aims or hypotheses and may involve literature review and / or primary research through fieldwork or experimentation.

The choice of dissertation topic may be related to the students’ choice of placement and practical specialism.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

This course is assessed by 100% coursework in all three years. The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations. The University of Lincoln’s policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.
Successful applicants will be invited for interview, where they have the opportunity to go through their portfolio with a member of the academic team.

Those applicants coming from Art, Design, Craft or Technology backgrounds should bring a portfolio of selected previous work. In making the choice of what to include, please bear in mind the skills that we are looking for include precision, dexterity and attention to detail.

Students from a background that does not offer artistic evidence to present in a portfolio, do not be unduly concerned. Students will have been selected for interview on the strength of their application, but may also have a hobby, such as needlework, DIY or model-making, that demonstrates potential skills. Students can bring evidence of these instead if appropriate.

Renowned conservation consultancy, Lincoln Conservation, has expertise in:

  • Architectural paint research and historic pigments
  • Historic materials analysis
  • Conservation of historic decorative interiors
  • Lead, mortar and renders analysis
  • Gilding and wallpapers
  • 3D laser scanning and digital replication
  • Conservation and restoration of architectural ceramics and tiles

Our conservators have helped to inform the restoration of St Pancras Station, Kenwood House and HMS Victory, among others. The consultancy provides opportunities for students to engage in practical research and conservation projects, offering invaluable professional and commercial experience.

A lab coat, a tool roll and goggles are provided to each student studying Conservation and Cultural Heritage.

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD

Students on this course will receive a licence for Adobe Creative Cloud free of charge

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

The second year of the BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage features an optional 12 week placement. Students will have the opportunity to source their own work placement in a museum, historic house or a private conservation studio either in the UK or overseas. Tutors can provide support in obtaining placements when required.

Recent placement destinations have included the Tate Modern in London, the National Museum of Denmark and Calke Abbey, Derbyshire.

Please note that students are required to cover the costs of their accommodation, travel and general living expenses when on placement. Opportunities for travel grants are available, more information can be provided by the programme leader. Please contact the University to find out more.

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

Students may have to pay travel and accommodation costs for second year placements, particularly for those outside of Lincoln. Opportunities for travel grants are available, more information can be provided by the programme leader. Please contact the University to find out more.

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above will be required.

A science based or history based subject is welcomed.

In addition, applicants should have three GCSEs at grade C or above, including English, or the equivalent.

Applicants will need to complete a successful interview.

Mature students with extensive relevant work experience and a portfolio of work, will be selected on individual merit. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Unconditional Offer Scheme

The University of Lincoln Unconditional Offer Scheme has been created to identify outstanding undergraduate applicants who we think would excel at Lincoln and make a significant contribution to our academic community.

The University of Lincoln takes a holistic contextual view, looking at students in the round, including all the information supplied in their application and any additional relevant assessment required, such as a portfolio, or interview. The qualities required for success are therefore not exclusively academic, and students’ drive, ambition, creativity, and potential are important factors in those considered for the scheme.

Applicants selected for the scheme, who commit to the University of Lincoln as their first choice of university, will receive an unconditional offer. We expect students in receipt of an unconditional offer to continue to apply themselves in their studies, both at school and when they join our academic community here at Lincoln. In previous years students who were selected and joined through the Lincoln unconditional offer scheme have shown very good success rate in their studies.

Find out more about the Unconditional Offer Scheme

The course is delivered through workshop, studio and laboratory sessions, lectures, demonstrations and seminars. After an initial introduction to conservation skills, materials and techniques, practical work is carried out on historic objects from museums and private collections.

An assessed vocational placement forms a major component of the course and live projects based in museums and historic houses are used in various aspects of the learning process. The costs of this are outlined in the Placements tab and the Fees tab.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Applied Practical Skills (Core)
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Applied Practical Skills (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to generic practical skills used in the treatment of historic objects. It provides a foundation to future work, although at the early stages the students work on exercises and simulations, prior to being allocated their first object.

Students can develop awareness of the practices and procedures common to areas of conservation treatment including laboratory and bench skills, documentation skills and basic decision-making skills.

Becoming a Professional (Core)
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Becoming a Professional (Core)

The module supports students in planning and preparing for their professional life by providing a framework to successfully navigate their way through university study, including progression to postgraduate level, and from this springboard to their chosen professional destination. It is intended to provide students with the knowledge, skills and insights into how to manage the transitions into university and from there into the professional world.

Conservation Processes (Core)
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Conservation Processes (Core)

In this module students have the chance to learn the theory and application of basic conservation principles related to observation, documentation, condition assessment and cleaning of historic objects; adhesives, consolidants, modelling and casting.

Conservation Science 1 (Core)
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Conservation Science 1 (Core)

This module is designed to introduce students to basic chemistry concepts, and the scientific study of materials commonly found in cultural heritage. Students may develop a systematic approach to scientific investigation and examination of historic objects and an understanding to the nature of different materials, technological factors and the processes of deterioration.

Conservation Theory (Core)
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Conservation Theory (Core)

This module aims to provide the underpinning basic theoretical knowledge related to historic materials, on which the discipline of conservation is based. Students are introduced to a range of conservation techniques, through lectures discussing a range of different material types and their potential deterioration.

Documentation techniques (Core)
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Documentation techniques (Core)

This module provides an introduction to the recording skills necessary for a practising conservator. Various forms of documentation encountered in the practice of conservation are introduced, and drawing and photography recordings skills developed. Students can be introduced to the basic principles of photography, lighting techniques and their application in conservation. The conventions and standard representations used in record drawing are also introduced.

Introduction to Visual and Material Culture (Core)
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Introduction to Visual and Material Culture (Core)

This module is designed as an introduction to visual and material culture, embracing the history of art and architecture, historical archaeology, and the conservation of historical buildings. It aims to enable students to interrogate visual and material objects throughout the past and to understand their functions and possible meanings of visual and material objects as primary sources.

Accessing Ordinary Lives: Interpreting and Understanding Voices from the Past, 1880 – present (Option)
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Accessing Ordinary Lives: Interpreting and Understanding Voices from the Past, 1880 – present (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to resurrect and understand the ordinary lives of people like themselves and their forebears from the sources available to us. The course picks up on both well-established and recent trends in historical research that have sought to give voice to ordinary people and promote from the historical records the lives of marginalised people such as homosexuals, women, children, the working classes, ethnic minorities alongside more familiar narratives of the great and the good.

Applied Practical Conservation 2 (Core)
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Applied Practical Conservation 2 (Core)

This module aims to develop the basic skills introduced in year one and apply them to the conservation of objects related to a range of material types. Theoretical concepts introduced in Year 1 can be developed and underpin students’ practice.

The module offers the chance to develop important transferable skills for understanding of the behaviour of materials and manual dexterity. It also looks to reinforce and develop students' skills in conservation report-writing.

Archaeology (Option)
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Archaeology (Option)

Archaeologists record, excavate and analyse the material evidence of our past to illuminate aspects of human life not otherwise recorded. In this module students will have the opportunity to take part in an excavation and will learn how to collect, interpret and care for archaeological evidence.

Britons and Romans, 100 BC-AD 450 (Option)
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Britons and Romans, 100 BC-AD 450 (Option)

This module examines how and why the culture of Britain changed in the period of increasing contact with, and eventual incorporation into, the Roman Empire. Examining the key material, behavioural, ideological and structural changes to society in the period c. 100 BC to AD 450, it will question to what degree each aspect was a wholesale incorporation of ‘foreign’ ideas, technologies and goods, a local interpretation and adoption of these importations into an existing social system, or a local creation that was distinctly Romano-British, if often termed ‘Roman’.

Conservation Placement (Option)
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Conservation Placement (Option)

This module focuses around a 12 week period of placement in a museum, historic house or private workshop. Students are responsible for negotiating the placement arrangement with support and guidance from their placement tutor. Students are encouraged to select a placement to suit their individual aspirations and needs. This concludes with a presentation, which is designed to allow all group members to benefit from the experience of their peers.

Conservation Science 2: Analytical Techniques (Core)
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Conservation Science 2: Analytical Techniques (Core)

This module aims to further develop knowledge of materials science and its relevance to conservation. Students have the chance to develop skills in the use of scientific analytical techniques for the examination and identification of materials encountered in historic objects and their treatment.

Digital Heritage (Option)
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Digital Heritage (Option)

The cultural heritage sector increasingly offers opportunities for the application of digital technologies as communication, research and recording tools. This module enables students to become familiar with some of these advanced recording techniques for the study and recording of objects.

Disease, Health, and the Body in Early Modern Europe (Option)
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Disease, Health, and the Body in Early Modern Europe (Option)

This module examines how physicians, other practitioners, and the public understood the body, disease, and health in the early modern period. Although the medical system of Galen (2nd century AD) and humoral medicine guided Western medicine until the 1800s, between 1500-1700 there were major challenges to this traditional system. The work of elites such as Paracelsus and Van Helmont (chemical medicine), Vesalius (anatomy), Harvey (circulation and respiratory physiology) will be placed in a greater religious, social, and cultural context.

Early Modern Family: Households in England c.1500-1750 (Option)
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Early Modern Family: Households in England c.1500-1750 (Option)

The module looks at a number of ways in which historians have studied the family in Britain between c.1500 and 1800. It will examine a range of historical approaches from the demographic to the more qualitative and anthropological. Close attention is paid to the problems historians of the pre-industrial family confront in their examination of the surviving primary sources.

Education and the State in Post-War England (Option)
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Education and the State in Post-War England (Option)

This module aims to develop the skills of critical analysis and source interrogation by exploring the relationship between the State, at its central and local levels and the provision of education in England, with particular emphasis on developments since 1945.

Experiencing and Remembering Civil War in Britain (Option)
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Experiencing and Remembering Civil War in Britain (Option)

The civil wars that raged across England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland in the mid-seventeenth century were among the most turbulent and exhilarating times in British history. This module explores the diverse ways in which the wars were explained, experienced and remembered by those who lived through them. Students can consider the extent to which this period, often described as one of 'revolution', left a lasting impression on British society, culture, religion and politics.

Fighting for Peace? Politics, Society and War in the Modern Era (Option)
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Fighting for Peace? Politics, Society and War in the Modern Era (Option)

The modern period has often been understood as a time when peace was considered the natural state of societies, where states and non-governmental groups have been concerned with achieving a lasting peace and avoiding repetitions of bloody conflict. Wars, however, have not become a thing of the past, and today we live in a condition of seemingly permanent war where civilians are often the primary targets. This module will look at how ideas and practices of war have altered in the last few hundred years, and how these notions have been contested and challenged. The module asks where these ideas came from, and how concepts of war and peace, and violence and non-violence have been reframed in various ways. The course is focussed on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and moves chronologically from the Napoleonic wars, to contemporary conflicts through a series of case studies that cover wars, diplomacy, the aftermath of wars, and peace movements. Each case study will draw on key themes which run throughout the module, including pacifism, militarism, imperialism, culture, race, gender and nationalism.

From ‘Bright Young Things’ to Brexit: British media and society since 1919 (Option)
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From ‘Bright Young Things’ to Brexit: British media and society since 1919 (Option)

This module examines British media and society in Britain from the end of World War I, through World War II, and into the uncertain waters of the postwar period and the 21st century. A range of domestic and international factors that shaped modern Britain will be investigated throughout the module, including the interwar slump, World War II, decolonisation, increased immigration, the ‘decline’ of the welfare state, the ‘Troubles’ in Ireland, the election of Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister, and Britain’s unsteady relationship with Europe. These events not only shaped Britain itself but also occurred in dialogue with the increasingly powerful role of media in the 20th and 21st centuries. This module will bring specific attention to the ways in which the press, cinema, radio, television, music, and also the web reflected, engaged with, and sometimes shaped popular understandings of society, culture, and politics in the period. We will examine this history of media in conjunction with a history of British society in order to investigate claims by historians that a ‘democratic culture’ emerged in 20th century Britain.

Gender and Sexuality in Britain 1700-1950 (Option)
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Gender and Sexuality in Britain 1700-1950 (Option)

This module will interrogate aspects of the history of gender and sexuality in Britain over a 250-year span, coinciding with the arrival of ‘modernity’. It will introduce students to debates over the relationship between gender, sexuality, and structural changes in society, economy and politics, as well as thinking about gender and sexuality as discourse and subjectivity. Further, it will introduce students to a wide range of source material for the social and cultural history of early modern and modern Britain and seek to develop their confidence in using such diverse sources skillfully.

The module takes a thematic approach, although within each theme, specific chronological examples will be examined. Thus continuity and change can be highlighted, and it is intended to resist a narrative of progress towards ‘modern’ liberal views of gender and sexuality. However, a clear chronological framework will also be developed through examples which will help students gain a clear understanding of context.

Grand Expectations? America during the Cold War (Option)
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Grand Expectations? America during the Cold War (Option)

The United States emerged from the Second World War a superpower, with, to an extent, a belief that it could remake the world. The challenges of the Cold War years were to demonstrate how limited was that power. This module explores the key social, political, economic and cultural developments in the United States between 1945 and 1990.

Hell and Damnation, life and afterlife: cultures of belief in England c.1550-1750 (Option)
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Hell and Damnation, life and afterlife: cultures of belief in England c.1550-1750 (Option)

This module examines the changing attitudes to life and the afterlife in England, and their cultural representation, in the two centuries after the Protestant Reformation. Examining the expansion in a number of rival religious and political groups, it considers the importance placing these within a social, cultural and economic, as well as theological, context. The module will focus on a range of religious groups considered to be a threat to the established church, or who have been identified by scholars as particularly significant in the period.

History and Literature in the C18th and C19th (Option)
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History and Literature in the C18th and C19th (Option)

Works of fiction are not just a source of entertainment. They are a crucial and exciting route into understanding the past. Novels, short stories and poems allow us to understand how debates and ideas about society and identity circulated and how writers attempted to reinforce or change the way that readers looked at the world. This module will examine how a wide range of fiction produced in Britain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries addressed the key themes of class, politics and gender. Students will have the opportunity to examine the treatment of these concepts in genres as varied as crime fiction, popular romance, children’s literature, science fiction, war writing and feminist fiction.

Imperial Cities of the Early Modern World. (Option)
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Imperial Cities of the Early Modern World. (Option)

One of the ways in which early modern monarchs and rulers legitimised their authority and projected their power was through architecture and urban design. In this period capital cities across Europe, America and Asia were embellished with architecture and urban design inspired by Renaissance ideals of social order. This module examines the ways rulers imagined and built a number of imperial capital cities across Europe, America and Asia.

Italy, a Contested Nation. Social and political conflicts from Garibaldi to Berlusconi (Option)
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Italy, a Contested Nation. Social and political conflicts from Garibaldi to Berlusconi (Option)

Italy is a highly-politicised and ideologically-divided country. Divisions and internal conflicts, which have reached dramatic peaks, are a permanent feature in Italian history. They mirror unsolved social and political contradictions that many historians consider to be the result of the process of the Italian Risorgimento. National unification was prompted by republicans, but it was the Monarchy that achieved it.

Madness and the Asylum in Modern Britain (Option)
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Madness and the Asylum in Modern Britain (Option)

This module explores the relationship between madness and British society from the late eighteenth century to the present day. Students can examine how institutional approaches to the treatment of insanity have changed, from the eighteenth-century madhouse, to the Victorian asylum, to care in the community in the twentieth century. They will assess changing medical, legal and lay responses to insanity, including the role that class, gender, family and community played in defining insanity and its treatment.

Material Histories: Objects and Analysis (Option)
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Material Histories: Objects and Analysis (Option)

This module will give students a unique opportunity to develop their practical skills for studying objects while developing their understanding of the relationship between history and material culture. Students can explore how object-based study can enhance their practice as conservators and historians and how material culture studies can lead to insights that cannot be reached through other approaches.

Media, Controversy and Moral Panic (Option)
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Media, Controversy and Moral Panic (Option)

This module explores the history of media controversy and ‘moral panic’ during the twentieth century. It is designed to introduce students to media texts (especially films and television programmes) that have sparked debate and extreme differences of opinion among audiences in Britain and America. Students will be expected to engage with a range of films, television programmes and primary source material, which may include newspapers and television news broadcasts from the Media Archive of Central England (MACE).

Medicine, Sexuality and Modernity (Option)
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Medicine, Sexuality and Modernity (Option)

This is a general introductory module on the history of medicine and sexuality from 1850 to 2000. It aims to give an overview of some of the major themes within the modern history of medicine and sexuality. It focuses on how our understanding of the human body, reproduction and sexuality in a socio-cultural and political context evolved from the advent of evolutionary thought to present day debates about enhancement and reproductive medicine. Sexual behaviour and reproduction became major concerns in medicine and politics in the modern period. Sexuality became an object of scientific enquiry and governments developed new policies to regulate sexual behaviour. This module will give students an excellent grounding in modern and contemporary history that will complement further modules at level 2 and 3 that deal with sexuality, gender, race, science and medicine.

Medieval Man and the Supernatural c. 1200-1500 (Option)
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Medieval Man and the Supernatural c. 1200-1500 (Option)

Miracles and magic; werewolves, vampires, priests and witches; church services and rituals. All of these formed a part of the belief system of medieval men and women between 1200 and 1500. This module uses original primary sources ranging from ghost stories to confessions of wizards to formal trials of heretics to look at what people believed, how we need to think about those beliefs today and what they tell us about Western European medieval society.

People on the move: migration, identity and mobility in the modern world (Option)
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People on the move: migration, identity and mobility in the modern world (Option)

People have migrated as long as the human race has existed and this module places this fundamental aspect of human experience at its heart. Issues surrounding migration and the movement of peoples are central to contemporary politics and society, as the management of people seeking refuge and better prospects preoccupies governments around the world. This situation makes ever more urgent our need to understand the history of migration and how it has shaped cultures across time and space. People on the move focuses upon the movement of people at particular points in modern history, considering the forces that propel people to risk their own lives and possibly those of their families, uproot from home and enter the potentially perilous and peripatetic life of a migrant. We will discuss the prospects and challenges of migration, and subsequently how diasporic cultures develop and the benefits and tensions surrounding integration. We will consider what happens when communities come into contact due to migration and the subsequent influences upon culture, religion, politics and identity. Through a series of in-depth case studies from the modern period, from the forced movement of the colonial era to twentieth century migration across the Atlantic, we will encounter a variety of geographical regions and processes of migration. A variety of historical sources will be interrogated to access the stories of migrants and about migrants, including texts (such legal and government documents, letters, memoirs and oral histories), images, objects and architecture. Addressing themes such as empire, economics, identity and religion in different contexts allows us to make meaningful comparisons between migrations across time and space.

Power and the Presidency in the United States (Option)
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Power and the Presidency in the United States (Option)

This module introduces students to history of the US presidency by investigating selected past presidents from Washington to Trump. By reading and analysing the biographies of various presidents, key historical discussions as well as primary sources, including presidential addresses, campaign speeches, policy documents, and internal White House documents, and media accounts, students will be able to discuss and evaluate the major themes associated with the Office of the President.

The main question students will be asked to engage with through this course is “what makes an effective president?” In answering this question students will discuss themes ranging from the establishment of the office during the American Revolution, the ability of presidents to pass civil rights reform, the rise and fall of the imperial presidency, the decline and restoration of presidential influence, hidden illness in the oval office, the growth of partisanship, the impact of the media and presidential communication strategies, and the changing presidential electorate. By exploring these themes as well as the achievements, scandals and the legacies of various presidents, students will be able to determine how individual presidents have coped with the pressures of the office and what influence they have exerted on the office.

Powerful Bodies: Saints and Relics during the Middle Ages (Option)
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Powerful Bodies: Saints and Relics during the Middle Ages (Option)

This module investigates the matter of sanctity during the middle ages, focusing in particular on two different aspects: the construction of the memory of saints, through texts, images and architecture, and the crucial role of their mortal remains. Spanning from the fourth to the fourteenth Century, this module offers not only a general approach to the phenomenon of sanctity, but also detailed analysis of different case studies, from early Christian saints and their commemoration in martyria to Romanesque shrines in France and Italy. The module then considers the phenomenon of new saints, through discussion of the celebrated site of Saint Francis’s burial, San Francesco, in Assisi. Students can explore the case of Saint Hugh of Lincoln, discussing how his memory was preserved in the text of his life and how his canonization was mirrored in the very fabric of Lincoln Cathedral.

Preventive Conservation (Core)
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Preventive Conservation (Core)

This module looks to provide an introduction to the preventive conservation skills needed to set out as a practicing conservator. Students have the chance to develop an understanding of practical preventive conservation and collections management procedures, and can gain experience in environmental monitoring and surveying. Topics such as integrated pest management and emergency planning are also discussed.

Queenship in Britain: Gender, Politics and Power (Option)
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Queenship in Britain: Gender, Politics and Power (Option)

Queenly figures are a mainstay of popular history. Propelled by innumerable representations ranging from the laudatory hagiographical sketches of the prolific Strickland sisters in the 19th century to the popular fictions of authors such as Philippa Gregory, Queens have become the best recognised of historical figures. Queens have also been invoked for more political reasons over the centuries such as in the works of Christine de Pizan, Cecily Hamilton and more recently Caryl Churchill as examples of powerful women in bids to challenge gendered inequalities in the authors’ own centuries. But how much do we actually understand about what it meant to be a Queen, especially in an era when all political power was gendered as male? This module encourages students to consider this question. Opening with an exploration of different historical interpretations and presentations of Queenship it then uses a series of case studies to explore the different ways in which Queenship was constructed and deployed in particular historical eras.

Salvation and Damnation, 600-1750 (Option)
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Salvation and Damnation, 600-1750 (Option)

Concern with, and ideas about, the supernatural influenced all areas of life for medieval and early modern men and women, and cut across all levels of society. In an age where religion was a state concern, many of these concerns were articulated or shaped within the context of the Church, all across Western Europe, yet throughout our period religious life was characterised by its great diversity. This module examines changing religious practices and beliefs in Europe, although with a particular focus on England, from the early Middle Ages until the seventeenth century, charting continuity and change in people’s thinking about their relationship – both individually and collectively - with the divine. The module is divided into three blocks: (1) early medieval, in which we explore the adoption of Christianity as a state religion, the slow emergence of an institutional church, missionary and conversion activities, and campaigns against heresy; (2) high to late medieval where we examine the tension between the theology of the church and the beliefs of the individual in a time of increased attempts at centralisation by the Western Church; (3) early modern, from the Reformation, via the Civil War, to early eighteenth-century rational religion and alternative versions of spirituality, and their impact on attitudes to religious and other minority groups.

Scrambling for Africa? Cultures of Empire and Resistance in East Africa, 1850-1965 (Option)
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Scrambling for Africa? Cultures of Empire and Resistance in East Africa, 1850-1965 (Option)

East Africa became a significant theatre of empire from the mid-nineteenth century, when David Livingstone championed European intervention to bring ‘Christianity, commerce and civilisation’ to the region. This module will explore the expansion of the British Empire into East Africa from the late nineteenth-century era of ‘high imperialism’ until decolonisation in the 1960s. This region provides rich opportunities to deepen an understanding of imperialism and offers key themes in the history of empire, including exploration, slavery, race, identity, gender, imperial networks, cultural representation and indigenous agency.

Struggles for Equality in Twentieth Century Europe (Option)
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Struggles for Equality in Twentieth Century Europe (Option)

This module explores through various case-studies how people struggled for equality and social justice over the last century and asks why inequality has risen over the last three decades. Starting from attempts to reshape societies at the end of the First World War and the Russian Revolutions, the module examines how reformist and revolutionary strategies opposed each other during the inter-war years, how fascist movements tried to contain attempts at change and what solutions they proposed to the question of inequality.

Study at a partner institution: Conservation (Option)
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Study at a partner institution: Conservation (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for Conservation students to spend a term studying at one of the University’s partner institutions. This opportunity has both academic and personal development dimensions. Study at another institution offers enhanced sporting, cultural and other activities to enhance students' overall profile, alongside the basic experience of adapting to and working effectively within a different academic culture. Please note that a limited number of places will be available each year.

The Age of Improvement: the Atlantic World in the long eighteenth century (Option)
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The Age of Improvement: the Atlantic World in the long eighteenth century (Option)

The period from 1700 to 1850 was one of transition and change in the British Isles and North America, marking an ideological and material shift away from the legacy of medieval Europe and the period of initial colonial contact. This module challenges students to engage with historical, cartographical, and material evidence. Students are introduced to the landscapes, streetscapes, and social make-up of the long eighteenth century, and can discuss in seminars how broad events impacted everyday lives, the urban, and rural landscape.

The Birth of the Modern Age? British Politics, 1885-1914 (Option)
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The Birth of the Modern Age? British Politics, 1885-1914 (Option)

This module tests the claim that the period from the 1880s to the First World War was an ‘Age of Transition’, which witnessed the birth of modern British politics. Through an analysis of this argument, students are introduced to some of the major developments in British political history in the period 1885-1914, including the birth of the welfare state, the creation of the Labour Party, the conflict over ‘Votes for Women’ and British foreign policy before World War One.

The Emperor in the Roman World (Option)
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The Emperor in the Roman World (Option)

This module surveys the history of the Roman Empire not as a succession of emperors and achievements, victories and defeats, but as a complex of experiments in government and of attitudes to governance. Beginning with the transition from representative republican rule to the domination of an imperial dynasty and its network of élite dependants in the early first century, and concluding with the incipient takeover of this system by a newly Christianised ruling class in the early fourth century, students can explore the role of the emperor in the Roman world and the patterns of communication between him and his subjects.

The Forgotten Revolution? The Emergence of Feudal Europe (Option)
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The Forgotten Revolution? The Emergence of Feudal Europe (Option)

Almost all historians share the view that the social, economic and political structures of Europe in 1000 A.D. were significantly different to those that characterised the western superpower of Late Antiquity, the Roman Empire. In this challenging module, students will be encouraged to engage with a range of source material that will allow them to come to their own conclusions. Given this wide focus, students will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the fascinating story of post-Carolingian Europe in such a way that they enhance their abilities to think comparatively, a crucial weapon in the historian’s armoury.

The Rise of Islam: Religion, culture and war in the Middle East (Option)
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The Rise of Islam: Religion, culture and war in the Middle East (Option)

The victories of Arab armies over the forces of the Byzantine and Persian Empires in the seventh century were of monumental importance. Not only did they signal the decline of the two great superpowers of the late ancient world but they were accompanied, some scholars would argue caused, by the rise of a new monotheistic world religion: Islam. The first half of the module seeks to understand the conquests of the Arab armies and the emergence of Islam historically and culturally, in two specific contexts: (1) political conflict between the Persian and Byzantine Empires, during which Arabia often acted as a military frontier and different Arab groups as allies to one side or another; (2) contact and competition between Christianity, Judaism and other religious traditions in Arabia. The second half of the module explores how, after the initial victories over the Byzantine and Persian Empires, the new Islamic polity renewed itself, rolled forward further conquests, and focuses in particular on how an ‘Islamic’ culture was formed.

The World of Late Antiquity, 150-750 (Option)
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The World of Late Antiquity, 150-750 (Option)

This module aims to develop students' understanding of the political, social and cultural history of Late Antiquity (150-750), with a particular focus on two world-changing religious developments: the rise of Christianity and Islam. Although the geographical focus of our studies will be on eastern Mediterranean lands of an empire ruled from Constantinople, known to later scholars as the Byzantine Empire, the geographical range of the module will be wide and include western Europe, including the western Mediterranean, Persia, Arabia, and ‘barbarian’ territories beyond the Roman frontiers on the Rhine and Danube.

Themes in American Cultural History (Option)
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Themes in American Cultural History (Option)

This module aims to introduce students to some of the key interdisciplinary themes in American cultural history in the first half of the twentieth century as well as to theoretical works that have shaped American cultural studies since the 1950s. The module will investigate and evaluate academic argument relating to the study of American cultural history from a variety of theoretical, philosophical and methodological perspectives including feminism, social theory, post-structuralism, and postmodernism.

Understanding Exhibitions: History on Display (Option)
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Understanding Exhibitions: History on Display (Option)

This module will introduce students to the principles of understanding, evaluating and constructing exhibitions. It will focus on exhibiting in art, history and archaeology and will include both theoretical approaches to the understanding and critique of exhibitions and practical aspects of mounting an exhibition. The module will include visiting museums, galleries and other exhibition spaces to examine and analyse exhibitions in situ, as well as talks from museum professionals on aspects of exhibition development. Students will be assessed through the production of plans for a small temporary exhibition they develop individually.

Understanding Practical Making (Option)
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Understanding Practical Making (Option)

This module is designed to introduce the basic skills of working with glass, ceramic and fine metalwork. It provides an opportunity to investigate the potential and limitations of working with various materials, processes and techniques, associated with the practice of object manufacture against a relevant historical background.

Urban Life and Society in the Middle Ages (Option)
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Urban Life and Society in the Middle Ages (Option)

Between the 11th and the 12th centuries Europe went through some radical changes. This module will focus on case studies, such as Lincoln, London and Paris, among others. Students will have the opportunity to study how and why such centres grew from small towns to some of the greatest and most vibrant metropolis of Western Europe in the Middle Ages. For a comparative study, a range of primary sources will be taken into account, including contemporary descriptions of these cities and their inhabitants, historical records, art and architecture.

Village detectives: Unearthing new histories (Option)
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Village detectives: Unearthing new histories (Option)

The typical image of a rural village, whether a chocolate box idyll prettily nestled around its church or a commuter dormitory boringly empty of anything fun to do, rarely shows much evidence for anything dramatic. However, these places were created by people who lived through events which are almost unimaginable to us today including the Norman Conquest and the Black Death, and for whom a perpetual challenge was simply surviving in a period where barely half of those born lived to adulthood. In this module students will have the opportunity to learn how to critically analyse and interpret historical and archaeological evidence and to use their knowledge and skills to write a new history of any rural settlement of their choice.

World Heritage Management (Option)
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World Heritage Management (Option)

This module is designed to explore ideas of heritage protection, management and conservation from around the world. It will consider United Nations' efforts in the field and consider how this international perspective shapes local and national actions.

Applied Practical Conservation 3.1 (Core)
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Applied Practical Conservation 3.1 (Core)

This module allows students the opportunity to specialise in a specific material discipline, or alternatively to continue to pursue broader options. Students are encouraged to consider their choice of specialism for this module in line with their choice of dissertation and placement.

Applied Practical Conservation 3.2 (Core)
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Applied Practical Conservation 3.2 (Core)

This is a practical module covering the conservation treatment of one or more complex historic objects. Exact content will depend on object type chosen. This module allows students to choose to specialise in a specific material discipline, or alternatively to continue to pursue broader options.

Applied Preventive Conservation (Core)
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Applied Preventive Conservation (Core)

The module is designed to extend students' knowledge and awareness of preventive conservation skills. Students can carry out live projects in environmental monitoring, surveying collections and pest management in order to further their experience in these areas, in addition to examining how external factors such as buildings and pollutants can impact on collections care.

Conservation exhibition (Core)
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Conservation exhibition (Core)

This module covers the production of an exhibition of conservation work completed by students. Initial sessions discuss the theory of exhibition design and managing projects, before moving on to the detail of the exhibition itself. Students will be expected to manage all aspects of the exhibition, including curation, marketing and fundraising if applicable.

Conservation independent study: dissertation (Core)
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Conservation independent study: dissertation (Core)

The module allows students to undertake a major research project in an area of their own choice (approx. 10,000 words).

The student is allocated a dissertation tutor following their decision on the topic to be researched. The initial stage of planning involves the student confirming a working title and agreeing the structure to their work. Regular tutorials with the dissertation tutor will aid the students’ progress and time management.

The research should address clear aims or hypotheses and may involve literature review and / or primary research through fieldwork or experimentation.

The choice of dissertation topic may be related to the students’ choice of placement and practical specialism.

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

This course is assessed by 100% coursework in all three years. The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations. The University of Lincoln’s policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.
Successful applicants will be invited for interview, where they have the opportunity to go through their portfolio with a member of the academic team.

Those applicants coming from Art, Design, Craft or Technology backgrounds should bring a portfolio of selected previous work. In making the choice of what to include, please bear in mind the skills that we are looking for include precision, dexterity and attention to detail.

Students from a background that does not offer artistic evidence to present in a portfolio, do not be unduly concerned. Students will have been selected for interview on the strength of their application, but may also have a hobby, such as needlework, DIY or model-making, that demonstrates potential skills. Students can bring evidence of these instead if appropriate.

Renowned conservation consultancy, Lincoln Conservation, has expertise in:

  • Architectural paint research and historic pigments
  • Historic materials analysis
  • Conservation of historic decorative interiors
  • Lead, mortar and renders analysis
  • Gilding and wallpapers
  • 3D laser scanning and digital replication
  • Conservation and restoration of architectural ceramics and tiles.

The expertise of its consultants has helped to inform the restoration of the Midland Grand Hotel (now known as the St Pancras Renaissance Hotel) and HMS Victory, among others. When opportunities arise, students may apply to work on live projects, receiving valuable professional experience.

A lab coat, a tool roll and goggles are provided to each student studying Conservation and Cultural Heritage.

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD

Students on this course currently receive free access to Adobe Creative Cloud software for the duration of their studies.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

The second year of the BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage features an optional 12 week placement. Students will have the opportunity to source their own work placement in a museum, historic house or a private conservation studio either in the UK or overseas. Tutors can provide support in obtaining placements when required.

Recent placement destinations have included the Tate Modern in London, the National Museum of Denmark and Calke Abbey, Derbyshire.

Please note that students are required to cover the costs of their accommodation, travel and general living expenses when on placement. Opportunities for travel grants are available, more information can be provided by the programme leader. Please contact the University to find out more.

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

Other Costs

Students are required to cover the costs of their accommodation, travel and general living expenses when on placement. Opportunities for travel grants are available, more information can be provided by the programme leader. Please contact the University to find out more.

GCE Advanced Levels: BCC

International Baccalaureate: 28 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

A science-based or history-based subject is welcomed.

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 104 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

EU and International students whose first language is not English will require English Language IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Unconditional Offer Scheme

The University of Lincoln Unconditional Offer Scheme has been created to identify outstanding undergraduate applicants who we think would excel at Lincoln and make a significant contribution to our academic community.

The University of Lincoln takes a holistic contextual view, looking at students in the round, including all the information supplied in their application and any additional relevant assessment required, such as a portfolio, or interview. The qualities required for success are therefore not exclusively academic, and students’ drive, ambition, creativity, and potential are important factors in those considered for the scheme.

Applicants selected for the scheme, who commit to the University of Lincoln as their first choice of university, will receive an unconditional offer. We expect students in receipt of an unconditional offer to continue to apply themselves in their studies, both at school and when they join our academic community here at Lincoln. In previous years students who were selected and joined through the Lincoln unconditional offer scheme have shown very good success rate in their studies.

Find out more about the Unconditional Offer Scheme

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

DrLyndaSkipper

Dr Lynda Skipper

Programme Leader

Dr Lynda Skipper is programme leader for BA (Hons) Conservation of Cultural Heritage. After gaining a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Cambridge, she studied conservation at Lincoln. Her previous employers include the Science Museum and National Trust. She re-joined the University of Lincoln as a lecturer in 2011. Her research interests include paints, pigments and wallpapers.


Your Future Career

The course aims to equip graduates with the transferable skills to enable them to progress into a range of careers in the conservation and heritage industries. Links with employers around the world have opened up opportunities for our graduates to progress to roles in prominent institutions, such as Historic Royal Palaces, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Many graduates choose to go on to undertake further study at Master’s or doctoral level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

The course aims to equip graduates with the transferable skills to enable them to progress into a range of careers in the conservation and heritage industries. Links with employers around the world have opened up opportunities for our graduates to progress to roles in prominent institutions, such as Historic Royal Palaces, the V&A Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Many graduates choose to go on to undertake further study at Master’s or doctoral level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

EleanorPearce

Lincoln is bursting with history, making the city a wonderful place to study conservation. The city is full of old buildings, such as the cathedral, which would inspire any trainee conservator. Every staff member on the Conservation team has a vast array of skills, knowledge and experience.

Eleanor Pearce, Conservation of Cultural Heritage student

Facilities

A lab coat, a tool roll and goggles are provided to each student studying Conservation and Cultural Heritage.

Students on this course will receive a licence for Adobe Creative Cloud free of charge.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.