BA (Hons) Classical Studies

BA (Hons) Classical Studies

BA (Hons) Classical Studies at Lincoln offers students interested in the history and culture of the Greek and Roman worlds the opportunity to join a vibrant academic community based in a former Roman city.

The Course

Classical Studies is an interdisciplinary degree programme, drawing on the variety and richness of research and teaching within the School of History and Heritage and the College of Arts more widely. Students have the opportunity to study the Greek and Roman world and its reception with experts in history and archaeology, the history of art and architecture, heritage and conservation, literary and cultural studies, and philosophy, English, and drama.

The city of Lincoln takes its name from Lindum Colonia: a Roman legionary fortress established in the middle of the first century AD which became a settlement for retired soldiers a generation later. Above and below ground it preserves traces of this history, from fragments of walls and aqueducts to the street plan itself. Traffic still travels through the Newport Arch, its third-century gate, while the University is situated on the Brayford Pool, an inland port with remains of the Roman-period waterfront, connected to the River Trent.

Staff at the University of Lincoln research and teach in exciting areas, from the creation and reception of ancient art to literacy in the Mediterranean world, from the making of Roman London to the fall of the Empire in the West, from the culture of Classical Greek poetry to its reception in Late Antiquity. Staff draw on their research to inform teaching and aim to support students as they access specialist resources for their own studies, such as the digital library of Latin and Greek literature or the artefacts housed in The Collection, the archaeological museum of Lincoln, to which we have privileged access.

The Course

Classical Studies is an interdisciplinary degree programme, drawing on the variety and richness of research and teaching within the School of History and Heritage and the College of Arts more widely. Students have the opportunity to study the Greek and Roman world and its reception with experts in history and archaeology, the history of art and architecture, heritage and conservation, literary and cultural studies, and philosophy, English, and drama.

The city of Lincoln takes its name from Lindum Colonia: a Roman legionary fortress established in the middle of the first century AD which became a settlement for retired soldiers a generation later. Above and below ground it preserves traces of this history, from fragments of walls and aqueducts to the street plan itself. Traffic still travels through the Newport Arch, its third-century gate, while the University is situated on the Brayford Pool, an inland port with remains of the Roman-period waterfront, connected to the River Trent.

Staff at the University of Lincoln research and teach in exciting areas, from the creation and reception of ancient art to literacy in the Mediterranean world, from the making of Roman London to the fall of the Empire in the West, from the culture of Classical Greek poetry to its reception in Late Antiquity. Staff draw on their research to inform teaching and aim to support students as they access specialist resources for their own studies, such as the digital library of Latin and Greek literature or the artefacts housed in The Collection, the archaeological museum of Lincoln, to which we have privileged access.

The first year is designed to provide solid foundations in the study of the Classical Civilisation, focusing on the Mediterranean and Near East from 1000 BC to AD 600. Students are introduced to written and archaeological evidence, ancient art and architecture, Latin language and literature, and receive instruction in critical thinking and writing. Together these modules aim to develop the analytical skills that are required to undertake more advanced work.

In the second and third years, a variety of optional modules are available based on the research specialisms of our academic team. In the third year, students produce an extended piece of independent research on a topic of their choice.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Classical Art and Archaeology: from Knossos to Constantinople (Core)
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Classical Art and Archaeology: from Knossos to Constantinople (Core)

An introduction to the art and archaeology of the Classical world. This module will examine methods, themes, and evidence in studying the ancient world through material culture (objects, art/visual culture, architecture, and archaeological remains). It will present how physical remains can be used to produce interpretations of society (e.g. belief, power, and identity) in the Greek and Roman worlds. In tandem with a chronological progression, students will gain a comparative introduction to the variety of evidence and contexts, have the opportunity to engage with some of the most significant examples of material culture from the ancient world, and develop an understanding of the characters and artistic styles of different cultures and periods (Minoan, Mycenaean, Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic; Etruscan, Archaic/early Roman, Republican, Imperial, and Late Antique).

Classical Literature: from Troy to the Silver Age (Core)
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Classical Literature: from Troy to the Silver Age (Core)

This module offers a general introduction to the study of ancient Greek and Roman culture: it is designed to provide a taste of Classical literature and to help students understand what some of the major works meant both in their original historical context and over the course of their transmission and reception. In lectures and seminars students will engage with a selection of texts, and through examining these cultural products of the Greeks and Romans will come to appreciate the fundamentals of their society, culture, and thought. The texts will also serve to illustrate how the Classical world was in some ways similar, and in others dramatically different, to our own, and highlight some of the themes which continue to make it fascinating and inspiring to modern observers.

Critical Thinking and Writing (Core)
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Critical Thinking and Writing (Core)

This module aims to equip students with the skills necessary to communicate their learning in an academic environment, and also supports students in adjusting to the demands of higher education. The core objective of the module is to develop students’ critical thinking and writing skills.

Elementary Latin I (Core)
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Elementary Latin I (Core)

This module aims to provide an introduction to the basics of Latin for students with little to no prior experience of the language. In class we shall cover the equivalent of Wheelock's Latin chapters 1-20 (from the first conjugation to the fourth declension): students will gain the ability to translate and interpret with confidence sentences and short passages in prose and in verse of up to intermediate difficulty. This will constitute a foundation for sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in translation as well as in the original at higher levels of study.

Please note: those students with A-Level Latin or the equivalent, subject to successfully sitting a diagnostic Latin test before the first semester of their first year, may choose to take ‘The Medieval World’ or ‘Empire and After: Colonialism and its Consequences’ instead of this module; in semester two, however, they are required to continue their language studies in Elementary Latin II.

Elementary Latin II (Core)
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Elementary Latin II (Core)

This module aims to provide an continued introduction to the basics of Latin for students with little to no prior experience of the language. In class we shall cover the equivalent of Wheelock's Latin chapters 21-40 (from the third conjugation to questions): students will refine their ability to translate and interpret with confidence sentences and short to medium-length passages in prose and in verse of up to advanced difficulty. This will constitute a foundation for sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in translation as well as in the original at higher levels of study.

Empire and After: Colonialism and its Consequences (Option)
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Empire and After: Colonialism and its Consequences (Option)

This module aims to provide students with a survey of imperial histories, at the same time as introducing some key conceptual and analytical tools for understanding the history of colonialism in a variety of pre-modern and modern contexts, from the perspectives of both colonizers and colonized.

The Greek World (Core)
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The Greek World (Core)

This module introduces students to the history of ancient Greece in the archaic and classical periods. Students will examine the emergence of Greek societies and city states (poleis), the various invasions of Greece by the Persians and their defeats at Marathon, Salamis and Plataea, competition between Athens and Sparta. The module emphasises how different primary sources can be applied to the study of the archaic and classical Greek world, as well as considering different scholarly interpretations of these periods.

The Historian’s Craft (Core)
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The Historian’s Craft (Core)

This module focuses on developing students’ research skills in history and their understanding of research as a process of inquiry. The module aims to deepen skills developed in the first term, such as essay writing in history and information literacy, by working alongside staff from the School in analysing primary and secondary sources relating to specific approaches to History.

The Medieval World (Option)
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The Medieval World (Option)

This module offers an introduction to the sources, approaches and methods necessary for the study of the medieval world. Lectures provide a survey of key moments in medieval history from 300-1500, structured around the research specialisms of the module teaching team. The module focuses on issues of religion and power in the Middle Ages, while there is a strong methodological focus on the materiality of the medieval period.

The Roman World (Core)
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The Roman World (Core)

In 753 BC, or thereabouts, the city of Rome was founded, and in the centuries which followed, it expanded from a kingdom to a republic and, finally, an empire, spanning the whole Mediterranean world: from Gaul and Iberia in the west to Asia Minor and the Levant in the east. Most of our written evidence for that foundation and development comes from the century on either side of Augustus (27 BC-AD 14), the first Roman emperor and author of its transition from republic to empire, and most of his successors operated in his long shadow. This module will provide an overview of the socio-political changes from the contours of regal and republican government and culture to the social and military crises which led to dictatorship and empire and the domination of an imperial dynasty.
This module surveys the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman world as a complex conversation amongst written, material, and visual evidence, each not only supplementing the others but also often contributing new and otherwise unheard voices. We will explore the experiences of living, dying, working, and worshipping in the Roman world from the earliest evidence for the city of Rome to the diverse cultures of far-flung provinces. Through an examination of the dynamic and varied evidence of art, archaeology, architecture, epigraphy, and ancient histories, we will discover and question what it meant to live under the rule of Rome.

Art and Power: Projecting Authority in the Renaissance World (Option)
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Art and Power: Projecting Authority in the Renaissance World (Option)

Renaissance monarchs often employed artistic display to project royal authority. Ruling elites commissioned pieces of art not only for the embellishment of their residences, but also as a suitable vehicle to display authority. Kings and Queens commissioned tapestries, sculptures, royal palaces, or lavishly decorated printed books that narrated their achievements and omitted their failures. This module examines the diverse ways rulers and their entourage imagined and created an image of kingship through the visual arts.

Arthur and His Court (Option)
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Arthur and His Court (Option)

This module examines Arthurian narratives, myths, and traditions within a variety of contexts and media, and traces a variety of themes associated with Arthur and his court, including history and national identity; violence; kingship and rule; loyalty and betrayal; love, sex, and gender roles.

Students will be expected to assess the importance of a myth that spans more than a millennium and address how medieval texts made meaning within their specific socio-cultural situations, as well as how later periods make meaning through their deployment of the medieval in new contexts.

Britons and Romans, 100 BC-AD 450 (Option)
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Britons and Romans, 100 BC-AD 450 (Option)

This course will examine how and why the culture of Britain changed in the period of increasing contact with, and eventual incorporation into, the Roman Empire. Examining the key material, behavioural, ideological, and structural changes to society in the period c. 100 BC to AD 450, it will question to what degree each aspect was a wholesale incorporation of ‘foreign’ ideas, technologies, and goods, a local interpretation and adoption of these importations into an existing social system, or a local creation that was distinctly Romano-British, if often termed ‘Roman’.

Classics in Context (Core)
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Classics in Context (Core)

This module will give students the opportunity to read one text (in translation, the text will vary according to the specialization and interests of the module coordinator) closely and discuss sections each week with a tutor. It will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in textual analysis, including: researching an author; assessing the intended audience; considering the social/political context, the significance of genre and style, and other factors in how we interpret/understand a text. Students will also compare and critique research that has used the text and explore the possibilities it has to serve as primary evidence for the study of the ancient world.

Digital Heritage (Option)
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Digital Heritage (Option)

The cultural heritage sector increasingly offers opportunities for application of these rapidly developing digital technologies, as a communication, research and recording tool. This module offers the opportunity for students to become familiar with some of these advanced recording techniques for the study and recording of objects.

Dissertations and Beyond: Classical Studies Stream (Core)
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Dissertations and Beyond: Classical Studies Stream (Core)

This module aims to provide a framework for career planning and preparing for the world of work. This is part of the University’s skills and capabilities curriculum at level 2. It also provides the opportunity for students to develop management skills needed for independent study which is a compulsory part of level 3 and to begin to form a research strategy to enable completion of the independent study in Classical Studies.

Elementary Greek I (Option)
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Elementary Greek I (Option)

This module aims to provide an introduction to the basics of Greek for students with little to no prior experience of the language. In class we shall cover the equivalent of From Alpha to Omega chapters 1-25 (from the present active system to middle and passive participles): students will gain the ability to translate and interpret with confidence sentences and short passages in prose and in verse of up to intermediate difficulty. This will constitute a foundation for sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in translation as well as in the original at higher levels of study.

Elementary Greek II (Option)
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Elementary Greek II (Option)

This module aims to provide an continued introduction to the basics of Greek for students with little to no prior experience of the language. In class we shall cover the equivalent of From Alpha to Omega chapters 26-50 (from questions to attraction): students will refine their ability to translate and interpret with confidence sentences and short to medium-length passages in prose and in verse of up to advanced difficulty. This will constitute a foundation for sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in translation as well as in the original at higher levels of study.

Imperial Cities of the Early Modern World. (Option)
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Imperial Cities of the Early Modern World. (Option)

One of the ways in which early modern monarchs and rulers legitimised their authority and projected their power was through architecture and urban design. In this period capital cities across Europe, America and Asia were embellished with architecture and urban design inspired by Renaissance ideals of social order. This module examines the ways rulers imagined and built imperial a number of capital cities across Europe, America and Asia.

Intermediate Latin I: Prose (Option)
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Intermediate Latin I: Prose (Option)

This module aims to consolidate students' knowledge of and comfort with the principles of the Latin language through sustained reading of substantial extracts from a variety of prose authors. Classes will be structured around guided translation and interpretation of select set texts by Caesar, Cicero, and Livy, while commentary will focus on points of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, as well as of historical context and significance. This will provide experience in sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in the original as a foundation for original research at higher levels of study.

Intermediate Latin II: Verse (Option)
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Intermediate Latin II: Verse (Option)

This module aims to consolidate students' knowledge of and comfort with the principles of the Latin language through sustained reading of substantial extracts from a variety of verse authors. Classes will be structured around guided translation and interpretation of select set texts by Catullus, Virgil, and Ovid, while commentary will focus on points of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, as well as of historical context and significance. Students will also acquire a familiarity with metre and scansion in Latin poetry. This will provide further experience in sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in the original as a foundation for original research at higher levels of study.

Introduction to Exhibitions, Curatorship and Curatorial Practices (Option)
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Introduction to Exhibitions, Curatorship and Curatorial Practices (Option)

This module introduces students to the understanding of exhibitions and curatorial practices. Following an introduction on the history of collections and museums, the course will explore the many issues related to the display of art and objects. It combines the study of theoretical approaches and the analysis of relevant case studies, and considers topics related to audiences for museums and exhibitions, the presentation and explanation of artefacts and artworks, and the new opportunities offered by digital technologies.

Latin Literature in the Late Republic and Augustan Age (Option)
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Latin Literature in the Late Republic and Augustan Age (Option)

This module explores a broad sampling of major genres and authors, and aims to provide a basis for further study and enjoyment of Latin literature. The Late Republic and early Empire produced many of the most influential and imaginative authors in the canon of Classical Latin. Focussing on writers active between 90 BC and AD 14, often referred to as the Golden Age, we shall examine how the literature of this period—including history, epic, satire, elegy, letters, and scholarship—bears witness to contemporary social, political, and cultural transformations, such as the transition from republican to imperial government, the moral legislation of Augustus, and the role of education and literacy in society more broadly.
Weekly lectures will introduce students to the principle modes of Latin literature, taking a roughly chronological approach to the emergence and popularity of individual genres. An understanding of the historical context will also help to understand why certain types of writing developed and flourished at certain times. All texts will be read in English translation, though opportunities to read or translate from the original Latin will be available for interested students. This module is intended as a successor to the core first-year survey of Classical Literature.

Renaissance Literature (Option)
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Renaissance Literature (Option)

Students studying Renaissance Literature have the opportunity to look in detail at a range of texts from the late Elizabethan period to the mid-1630s, including work by Shakespeare, John Donne, Ben Jonson, and Mary Wroth. They also have the chance to explore the historical and cultural contexts in which these texts were produced, and the effects that they had on the politics and culture of the British Isles in the period. Lectures aim to examine post-Reformation England and late humanism, patronage, gender relations, early modern literary theory, education, and philosophy.

Renaissances (Option)
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Renaissances (Option)

This module explores cultural renaissances in Europe and beyond. It will examine the survival, imitation and revival of classical models from ancient Greece and Rome from late antiquity to the modern period. While our geographical focus will be the Mediterranean and northern Europe, we will also investigate cultures and cultural production influenced by European renaissances, for example in colonial Latin America, Africa and Asia. The first archaeological excavations in the eighteenth century inspired an interest in ancient ruins and a series of nineteenth-century revivals, not only of ancient but of medieval and Renaissance styles, linked to the rise of nation-states. Throughout the module, we will seek to understand the nature of particular renaissances and revivals and question the application and suitability of these terms. We will also engage with historical debates on the issue of periodization and ask how and why cycles of decline and renewal continue to shape our understanding of the past.

Restoration Literature (Option)
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Restoration Literature (Option)

Students taking Restoration Literature, the companion module to Renaissance Literature, can study in detail a range of texts written between the era of the English Civil War and the first decade of the eighteenth century, including work by John Milton, Andrew Marvell, Aphra Behn, and John Wilmot, the 2nd Earl of Rochester. Students will have the opportunity to also study the historical and cultural contexts in which these texts were produced. Lectures aim to examine the origins and effects of the civil war, the ethics of rebellion and reform, the Restoration theatre, religious controversies, gender relations, developing philosophical thought, and Restoration manners.

Study Period Abroad: Classical Studies Stream (Option)
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Study Period Abroad: Classical Studies Stream (Option)

This module provides an opportunity for Classical Studies students to spend a semester at second level studying at one of the University’s partner institutions in North America or Europe. This opportunity has both academic and a personal development dimensions.
In academic terms, during the semester abroad students undertake a course load at the partner institution of equivalent standard to that of the semester B programme at Lincoln (North American placements) or semester A or B (European placements).
Participation in study abroad also offers unique opportunities for personal student development in the wider sense. Although you will be supported through the application process by the module coordinator and colleagues at the partner institution, much of the responsibility for organising your time abroad rests with you. In addition, study abroad offers enhanced sporting, cultural, and other activities to enhance your overall profile, alongside the basic experience of adapting to and working effectively within a different academic culture.
Students must obtain a 2:1 or higher at Level 1 in order to be considered for participation in the exchange. Students must complete a 500-word essay explaining why they wish to participate and may be required to attend an interview.
A limited number of places will be available each year, and participation is at the discretion of the module coordinator and the Programme Leader.

Please note: for those students who choose to study abroad during the second semester of their second year, both of their optional choices in the first semester must be Classical Studies modules (excluding Medieval, Early Modern, Conservation, and Digital Heritage modules).

The Classical Tradition: from Medieval to Modern (Core)
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The Classical Tradition: from Medieval to Modern (Core)

This module provides an introduction to the historical and archaeological sources, approaches and methods necessary for the study of the ancient world. Lectures provide a survey of key moments in history, 1000 BC-AD 400, structured around the research specialisms of the module teaching team.

The Emperor in the Roman World (Option)
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The Emperor in the Roman World (Option)

This module surveys the history of the Roman Empire not as a succession of emperors and achievements, victories and defeats, but as a complex of experiments in government and of attitudes to governance. Beginning with the transition from representative republican rule to the domination of an imperial dynasty and its network of élite dependants in the early first century, and concluding with the incipient takeover of this system by a newly Christianised ruling class in the early fourth century, students can explore the role of the emperor in the Roman world and the patterns of communication between him and his subjects.

The Forgotten Revolution? The Emergence of Feudal Europe (Option)
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The Forgotten Revolution? The Emergence of Feudal Europe (Option)

Almost all historians share the view that the social, economic and political structures of Europe in 1000 A.D. were significantly different to those that characterised the western superpower of Late Antiquity, the Roman Empire. In this challenging module, students will be encouraged to engage with a range of source material that will allow them to come to their own conclusions. Given this wide focus, students will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the fascinating story of post-Carolingian Europe in such a way that they enhance their abilities to think comparatively, a crucial weapon in the historian’s armoury.

The Hellenistic World: from Alexander to Actium (Option)
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The Hellenistic World: from Alexander to Actium (Option)

Alexander the Great, king of Macedon (336-23 BC), created through military conquest an empire which stretched from the Adriatic Sea in the west to the Himalayan mountain range in the east. By force of personality, tactical brilliance, and careful diplomacy he was able to hold together this vast and diverse realm during his lifetime, but his sudden death led to a series of wars of succession. As the dust settled, a number of states were established throughout the Middle East, most notably the Ptolemaic kingdom in Egypt and the Seleucid empire in Mesopotamia and the Levant, forming a cultural network of shared Greek language and Graeco-Macedonian political institutions.
This module provides a survey of the history and archaeology of the eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East between the reign of Alexander the Great and the death of Cleopatra VII after the Roman victory at the Battle of Actium in 30 BC. Students will have the opportunity to explore the political histories, power structures, cultural developments, economic processes, and shifting ideologies associated with the major Hellenistic kingdoms and ending with the Roman conquest of the eastern Mediterranean region. But we will also consider how the Hellenistic period was a time of innovation, cultural connectivity, even globalization, laying the foundations of a Hellenized world of city-states which endured into and defined the Roman construction of a world empire in its aftermath.

The Rise of Islam: Religion, culture and war in the Middle East (Option)
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The Rise of Islam: Religion, culture and war in the Middle East (Option)

The victories of Arab armies over the forces of the Byzantine and Persian Empires in the seventh century were of monumental importance. Not only did they signal the decline of the two great superpowers of the late ancient world but they were accompanied, some scholars would argue caused, by the rise of a new monotheistic world religion: Islam. The first half of the module seeks to understand the conquests of the Arab armies and the emergence of Islam historically and culturally, in two specific contexts: (1) political conflict between the Persian and Byzantine Empires, during which Arabia often acted as a military frontier and different Arab groups as allies to one side or another; (2) contact and competition between Christianity, Judaism and other religious traditions in Arabia. The second half of the module explores how, after the initial victories over the Byzantine and Persian Empires, the new Islamic polity renewed itself, rolled forward further conquests, and focuses in particular on how an ‘Islamic’ culture was formed.

The World of Late Antiquity, 150-750 (Option)
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The World of Late Antiquity, 150-750 (Option)

This module aims to develop students' understanding of the political, social and cultural history of Late Antiquity (150-750), with a particular focus on two world-changing religious developments: the rise of Christianity and Islam. Although the geographical focus of our studies will be on eastern Mediterranean lands of an empire ruled from Constantinople, known to later scholars as the Byzantine Empire, the geographical range of the module will be extremely wide (western Europe, including the western Mediterranean, Persia, Arabia, and ‘barbarian’ territories beyond the Roman frontiers on the Rhine and Danube).

Understanding Practical Making (Option)
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Understanding Practical Making (Option)

This module is designed to introduce the basic skills of working with glass, ceramic and fine metalwork. It provides an opportunity to investigate the potential and limitations of working with various materials, processes and techniques, associated with the practice of object manufacture against a relevant historical background.

Urban Life and Society in the Middle Ages (Option)
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Urban Life and Society in the Middle Ages (Option)

Between the 11th and the 12th centuries Europe went through some radical changes. This module will focus on case studies, such as Lincoln, London and Paris, among others. Students will have the opportunity to study how and why such centres grew from small towns to some of the greatest and most vibrant metropolis of Western Europe in the Middle Ages. For a comparative study, a range of primary sources will be taken into account, including contemporary descriptions of these cities and their inhabitants, historical records, art and architecture.

Village detectives: Unearthing new histories (Option)
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Village detectives: Unearthing new histories (Option)

The typical image of a rural village, whether a chocolate box idyll prettily nestled around its church or a commuter dormitory boringly empty of anything fun to do, rarely shows much evidence for anything dramatic, but these places were created by people who lived through events which are almost unimaginable to us today including the Norman Conquest and the Black Death, and for whom a perpetual challenge was simply surviving in a period where barely half of those born lived to adulthood. In this module students will have the opportunity to learn how to critically analyse and interpret historical and archaeological evidence and to use their knowledge and skills to write a new history of any rural settlement of their choice.

Women in Ancient Rome (Option)
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Women in Ancient Rome (Option)

This module introduces students to the lives and experiences of women in the ancient world. By engaging with a wide range of material, visual, and written evidence, including poetry and epic, portraiture, inscriptions, legal texts, and civic and domestic architecture, students will investigate both the real historical circumstances of women’s lives and the ways in which they were constructed, represented, and perceived. The approach is thematic, covering Graeco-Roman concepts of sex and gender and examining the intersection between these categories and social class. We shall consider the experience of women at different stages of their lives, from birth, youth, marriage, and motherhood to old age, and how women were remembered and commemorated after death. Women also engaged with the civic and cultural institutions of the ancient world at various points in their lives, and we shall also consider their participation in religious rituals, civic patronage, and legal affairs.
The focus of this module is on the Roman world, and the material considered ranges in date from the Republican period to the end of the second century AD. Material from Greece, especially where it affects Roman art, literature, and ideas, will also be considered. The study of ancient women is, fundamentally, an interdisciplinary enterprise; in this module students will develop their skills in interpreting and writing about a variety of different forms of evidence, especially visual and material.

A Tale of Two Cities in Medieval Spain: From Toledo to Córdoba (Option)
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A Tale of Two Cities in Medieval Spain: From Toledo to Córdoba (Option)

In this module, students will have the opportunity to take a vivid and intellectually exciting journey through primary and secondary sources in order to understand the historical trajectory of the Iberian Peninsula from the end of the sixth century to the collapse of the Caliphate of Córdoba in 1031. The aim of the module is to provide an introduction to two major medieval cities, Toledo and Córdoba, via acquaintance with and discussion of material that allows us to reflect upon a fascinating complex of problems.

Advanced Latin I: Prose Author (Option)
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Advanced Latin I: Prose Author (Option)

This module aims to refine and extend students' mastery of the Latin language through focussed reading of unadapted extracts from a single prose author chosen according to available staff expertise and interest (e.g. Sallust). Classes will be structured around guided translation and interpretation of set passages, while commentary will encompass: (1) points of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary; (2) peculiarities of authorial style, in the context of other major writers; (3) historical situation and significance; (4) major studies of the author and text. This will offer practical experience of reading primary sources from the Classical world in the original for the purpose of original research in dialogue with relevant scholarship.

Advanced Latin II: Verse Author (Option)
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Advanced Latin II: Verse Author (Option)

This module aims to refine and extend students' mastery of the Latin language through focussed reading of unadapted extracts from a single verse author chosen according to available staff expertise and interest (e.g. Martial). Classes will be structured around guided translation and interpretation of set passages, while commentary will encompass: (1) points of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary; (2) questions of metre and scansion; (3) peculiarities of authorial style, in the context of other major writers and the rules of versification; (4) historical situation and significance; (5) major studies of the author and text. This will offer further practical experience of reading primary sources from the Classical world in the original for the purpose of original research in dialogue with relevant scholarship.

Ancient Graffiti (Option)
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Ancient Graffiti (Option)

This module explores a key resource for understanding the thoughts, feelings, and conversations of ancient people. Graffiti in Greek and Latin (and other languages) were marked onto fixed and portable surfaces throughout the ancient Mediterranean world, and their informal and non-official nature offers a unique window into the lives and worldviews of people often invisible or marginal in the standard documentary, literary, and material sources. Students will discover the wide range of different types of graffiti which survive and investigate the cultural context in which these were produced and consumed. We shall consider how graffiti reflect social, political, and cultural concerns and values, and pay attention to the ways in which historians and archaeologists have responded to and interpreted them, as well as how these approaches have changed over time. This will include examining how graffiti has been recorded and studied in other ancient cultures, particularly Mayan, where cities such as Tikal (in modern-day Guatemala) provide a rich corpus of graffiti and raise similar methodological issues.
This module ranges across the ancient Mediterranean world, and balances Greek and Latin evidence. We shall use online databases and images to discuss the graffiti of cities such as Pompeii and Herculaneum in their physical contexts. In discussion and writing students will develop their understanding not only of how graffiti reflected the worldview of those who created them, but also how it was perceived and understood by those who saw them.

Chivalry in Medieval Europe (Option)
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Chivalry in Medieval Europe (Option)

The module is aimed at exploring both the birth and development of the concept of chivalry in the Middle Ages. As a seminar-based module, a wide range of primary sources, as well as medieval and contemporary historiography on the subject will be made available to students, who will use them to explore how the role, image and function of medieval knights evolved over time.

Classical Commentary I (Core)
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Classical Commentary I (Core)

This module will give students the opportunity to analyse one text/author, object/assemblage/collection, structure, or site, according to their own research interests (the evidence chosen will be agreed at the start of the term). Paired with a tutor, each student will examine the evidence closely, find and read related research publications, and discuss each week. It will build on the skills developed in Classics in Context (L2) and provide students with the opportunity to direct their own path, engage closely with primary sources, develop skills in analysis and critical thinking, and broaden their knowledge of the evidence for and methods of studying the ancient world.

Classical Commentary II (Core)
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Classical Commentary II (Core)

This module will give students the opportunity to analyse one text/author, object/assemblage/collection, structure, or site, according to their own research interests (the evidence chosen will be agreed at the start of the term). Paired with a tutor, each student will examine the evidence closely, find and read related research publications, and discuss each week. It will provide students with the opportunity to direct their own path, engage closely with primary sources, develop skills in analysis and critical thinking, and broaden their knowledge of the evidence for and methods of studying the ancient world.

History at the End of the World (Option)
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History at the End of the World (Option)

Historian, journalist, political commentator and gossip columnist Matthew Paris, monk of St Albans, wrote what is still one of our main sources for British history of the thirteenth century. This module looks at Matthew Paris’s Great Chronicle, considering both Matthew himself and what he tells us about what this tells us about thirteenth-century English society. Students have the opportunity to think about what history was in the thirteenth-century and about attitudes to foreigners and national identity; power and poverty; propaganda and fiction; time, space and the apocalypse.

Independent Study: Classical Studies Stream (Core)
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Independent Study: Classical Studies Stream (Core)

At final level, every student on the BA (Hons) Classical Studies degree programme at the University of Lincoln must produce an independent study. This is an extended piece of work which gives them the opportunity to demonstrate they have acquired the skills to undertake detailed and substantial subject-specific research and writing founded on critical inquiry and analysis.

Intermediate Greek I: History and Philosophy (Option)
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Intermediate Greek I: History and Philosophy (Option)

This module aims to consolidate students' knowledge of and comfort with the principles of the Greek language through sustained reading of substantial extracts from a variety of prose authors. Classes will be structured around guided translation and interpretation of select set texts in Attic dialect by Xenophon, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle, while commentary will focus on points of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, as well as of historical context and significance. This will provide experience in sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in the original as a foundation for original research.

Intermediate Greek II: Drama and Poetry (Option)
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Intermediate Greek II: Drama and Poetry (Option)

This module aims to consolidate students' knowledge of and comfort with the principles of the Greek language through sustained reading of substantial extracts from a variety of verse authors. Classes will be structured around guided translation and interpretation of select set texts in Attic dialect by Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, and in Ionic dialect by Homer, while commentary will focus on points of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, as well as of historical context and significance. Students will also acquire a familiarity with metre and scansion in Greek poetry. This will provide further experience in sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in the original as a foundation for original research.

Latin Letter-Writing from the Republic to Late Antiquity (Option)
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Latin Letter-Writing from the Republic to Late Antiquity (Option)

This module explores the world of Latin epistolary culture from the late Republic to the early Patristic period of the fourth century AD. Students will meet the senders and recipients of the main surviving letter collections from Antiquity: Cicero, Seneca, Pliny, Fronto, Symmachus, Ambrose, Jerome, Paulinus, Augustine, and Sidonius. Their letters, and those of their peers, offer a unique snapshot of how ancient people represented themselves and their accomplishments and connections to others. Additionally, the preservation of documentary letters on materials such as stone and papyrus offer a complementary perspective on the lives, experiences, and concerns of ordinary men and women across the Mediterranean. Letter-writing was important at all social levels: mastery of the skills of literary composition was considered essential for membership in elite society, and ancient people valued such letters for their artistic merits and historical interest.
The first part of this module focusses on the practicalities of letter-writing: the physical technologies of writing and the practical considerations which went into sending a letter. Students will consider a wide range of letter types, including about trade and agriculture, introductions and recommendations (literary and otherwise), and epistolary poetry. We shall also read fictional letters and letters embedded in historical or legal writings, and examine the audiences of these texts and the reasons for their creation. By composing their own letters according to the rules found in ancient epistolary handbooks, students will develop a good understanding of the rules and the flexibility of ancient genres, as well as how they can be used by historians to study this material.

Making Militants: Teaching violence in late antiquity (Option)
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Making Militants: Teaching violence in late antiquity (Option)

Making Militants explores the role of violent teaching practices of various sorts in the making of men and women in late antiquity. Focusing on the fourth, fifth and sixth centuries, it addresses a pivotal period in the transition from the ancient to the medieval world, surveying the multiple small-scale arenas that made up the late antiquity – the household, the schoolroom, the barracks, and the monastery. By reading closely letters, biographical accounts, rulebooks, speeches and a wide range of other sources, we consider how violent educative practices made people who were capable of operating in a changing, unpredictable and often dangerous world. The men and women who were made in such spaces were the products of a society that was fundamentally violent, their own violence a product of long-established socialisation practices rather than acts of anti-social deviance.

Objects of Empire: the material worlds of British colonialism (Option)
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Objects of Empire: the material worlds of British colonialism (Option)

This module will investigate the history of imperial Britain through material culture. The objects of study will range from trophies looted in battle and a drum transported with slaves to Virginia to African sculpture depicting Europeans. Historians increasingly recognise the fresh insights objects offer to major themes in imperial history such as gender, race and class. This module responds to these new academic developments and will use objects and their biographies to study key phases and themes in the history of British Empire. Tracing the long history of such objects can enable us to explore how objects change meanings as they move through various colonial and post-colonial contexts.

Republicanism in Early Modern England, 1500-1700 (Option)
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Republicanism in Early Modern England, 1500-1700 (Option)

Although early modern England was a kingdom, governed by a monarch, many historians have claimed that there was a strong ‘republican’ undercurrent to Tudor and Stuart political thought. This module introduces students to the key approaches and methodologies of the history of ideas by focusing upon the various ways in which scholars have studied and conceptualised republicanism in early modern England and the on-going debate surrounding the origin, content and influence of republican ideas in the period 1500-1700.

Roman Lincoln (Option)
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Roman Lincoln (Option)

The history, archaeology, visual and material culture of Roman Lincoln (Lindum Colonia), within the context of the provinces of Roman Britain.

This course will explore the Roman-period military settlement and urban centre at Lincoln through the archaeological evidence within the context of broader changes across Britain in the first four centuries AD. It will provide students with the opportunity to handle and analyse objects from the Lincolnshire Archives and The Collection museum, to engage with the evidence that is visible in the modern city, to engage with excavation reports as primary evidence, and to consider how a military and urban centre was connected to rural sites, towns, and forts beyond. Students will research the city thematically, examining, e.g., identities of the inhabitants, belief and ritual practice, the economy and connectivity, and the function of urban centres like Lincoln to the Roman administration. Students will also compare and critique theoretical paradigms for urbanisation using evidence from Lincoln and comparing it to other forts, coloniae, and towns/cities across Britain and beyond.

Rome and Constantinople: Monuments and Memory, 200-1200 (Option)
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Rome and Constantinople: Monuments and Memory, 200-1200 (Option)

This module is devoted to two cities that were capitals of the Roman Empire, focusing on their monuments and how these were perceived and remembered over centuries. Rome and Constantinople, or Old Rome and New Rome as they came to be called in the East, were imperial cities where the most powerful figures – emperors and patriarchs, popes and saints – of antiquity and the Middle Ages built and destroyed, appropriated and reconfigured spaces, buildings and structures.

Rulers and Kings: Visualising Authority in Medieval Europe (Option)
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Rulers and Kings: Visualising Authority in Medieval Europe (Option)

This module investigates the nature of rulership during the middle ages, exploring how images and architecture served to visually define and articulate the authority of kings and rulers during the Middle Ages. The module will discuss in depth three different case studies: Charlemagne and the Holy Roman Empire; the Norman rulers of Southern Italy; Louis IX and the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris.

Sex, Texts and Politics: Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (Option)
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Sex, Texts and Politics: Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (Option)

This module concentrates on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, with a particular emphasis on The Canterbury Tales, perhaps Chaucer’s most famous work.

Students will have the opportunity to examine the General Prologue and a variety of tales in relation to their historical context and literary antecedents, and, throughout, specific attention will be given to questions of genre (ranging from fable and epic to satire and romance), literary authority, narrative construction, and medieval aesthetics.

The Byzantine World, c.750-c.1500 (Option)
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The Byzantine World, c.750-c.1500 (Option)

This module is devoted to developing an understanding of the political, social and cultural history of the Byzantine World (c. CE 750-c. 1500), with a particular focus on institutions (for example the imperial office, monasteries), practices (warfare, diplomacy, ritual and ceremonial) and material resources (coinage, silks, 'Greek fire'). Byzantine art and architecture, literature and theology, will be studied in addressing aspects of the culture and ideology of the empire.

The Goths: Barbarians through history? (Option)
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The Goths: Barbarians through history? (Option)

This module explores two inter-related questions: Who were the Goths of late antiquity? Why have ideas of ‘Gothic-ness’ recurred so frequently since the end of the last Gothic kingdom in 711 CE? The module analyses historical, archaeological and other evidence for the Goths, their migration into Roman territory and their eventual settlement in Gaul, Spain and Italy in the third to eighth centuries. Drawing on the most recent scholarship, students will have the chance to challenge assumptions that the Goths were archetypal barbarians and caused the fall of the Roman Empire in the West and the dawn of a ‘dark age’.

The Roman City (Option)
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The Roman City (Option)

To the citizens of the Roman world, civility (civilitas) – right conduct of government, sound behaviour of individuals, citizenship itself – was a function of the city (civitas), which constituted the centre of the Roman state and society. This module will take students on a guided tour of the Roman city, using each stop along the way as a point of entry into one or more aspects of the politics, society, economy, and culture of Rome and its empire. Students will be challenged to reimagine urban life via a detailed engagement with a representative array of written, material, and visual sources and the main lines of the secondary literature.

The Roman Countryside (Option)
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The Roman Countryside (Option)

Before the Roman invasion of AD 43, everyone in Britain lived in ‘the countryside’, for the simple reason that there were no cities or towns. Indeed, throughout the four centuries of Roman rule which followed, the vast majority of people still lived outside of urban and military centres. The core objective of this module is an archaeological exploration of the great diversity of evidence, analysing the significance of the changing nature of rural society and the creation of rural landscapes and identities, focusing on Britain from the late pre-Roman Iron Age, through the Roman period, to its sub-Roman aftermath (c. 100 BC–AD 500).

What is the Renaissance? (Option)
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What is the Renaissance? (Option)

This module aims to explore the intellectual and cultural achievements of Renaissance, as well as its historiographic context. The period of transition from 'medieval' to 'modern' society that the Renaissance represents (or has been characterised as representing) is one of the most challenging areas of historical study, profoundly influencing historiography. Students will have the opportunity to examine in depth to what extent the historical periodisation of the 'Renaissance' has been a deliberate, although sometimes contentious, means to better understand events of the past, particularly in relation to cultural analysis.

Work Placement: Classical Studies Stream (Option)
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Work Placement: Classical Studies Stream (Option)

The module will give students practical experience of the workplace. Students will normally define, plan and undertake a specific project. In addition students will gain experience of a range of tasks appropriate to sector-specific professional skills.

Please note: for those students who choose to hold a work placement, preferably during the first semester of their third year, both of their optional choices in the second semester must be Classical Studies modules (excluding Medieval, Early Modern, Conservation, and Digital Heritage modules).

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Research

The research of our academic staff directly informs their teaching. The University has expertise ranging from Egyptology to the reception of antiquity, with particular strengths in Roman archaeology, Late Antique and Byzantine history, Early Christian visual and material culture, and Classical art and architecture.

Staff maintain a high research profile through publication in leading journals and prestigious essay collections, regular attendance at key national and international conferences, and as invited speakers or visiting fellows at other institutions, including universities, research centres and museums.

Lincoln Conservation

Lincoln Conservation brings together research, teaching and commercial expertise specialising in architectural paint research and the digital and physical conservation of historic objects, decorative schemes and buildings. The expertise of its consultants has helped to inform the restoration of the Midland Grand Hotel (now known as the St Pancras Renaissance Hotel), HMS Victory and Southwell Minster, amongst others.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

2018/19 UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £13,800 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,100 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above.

Applicants will also be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (or equivalent), including English.

Mature students with extensive relevant experience will be selected on individual merit. All relevant work experience should be noted on the application form.

If you would like further information about entry requirements or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097 or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Unconditional Offer Scheme

The University of Lincoln Unconditional Offer Scheme has been created to identify outstanding undergraduate applicants who we think would excel at Lincoln and make a significant contribution to our academic community.

The University of Lincoln takes a holistic contextual view, looking at students in the round, including all the information supplied in their application and any additional relevant assessment required, such as a portfolio, or interview. The qualities required for success are therefore not exclusively academic, and students’ drive, ambition, creativity, and potential are important factors in those considered for the scheme.

Applicants selected for the scheme, who commit to the University of Lincoln as their first choice of university, will receive an unconditional offer. We expect students in receipt of an unconditional offer to continue to apply themselves in their studies, both at school and when they join our academic community here at Lincoln. In previous years students who were selected and joined through the Lincoln unconditional offer scheme have shown very good success rate in their studies.

Find out more about the Unconditional Offer Scheme

The first year is designed to provide a solid foundation in the study of the ancient world. All students take introductory modules in Greek and Roman history and culture, Classical art, archaeology, literature and the Latin language. These provide orientation in the handling of textual, visual and material evidence from Antiquity, and particularly in the sensitive reading of written sources. Alongside modules in critical thinking, writing and historiography, these foundation modules aim to develop the skills necessary for students to chart their own path through the balance of the degree programme.

In the second year, all students take an introductory module in Classical reception, while beginning their apprenticeship in detailed engagement with a Classical source and the design of an independent research project. In addition, there is a broad range of optional modules, based on the research specialisms of our academic staff, in the history, art, archaeology and language of the Classical world (including Greek), as well as its varied cultural legacies in medieval, early modern and modern Europe, and beyond.

In the third year, students engage in sustained study of and commentary on a text, object or site from the Classical world, and produce an extended piece of independent research on a topic of their choice under the supervision of one of our team. In addition, there is a further selection of optional modules at a more specialist and research-intensive level. Students are encouraged to choose according to their interests.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Classical Art and Archaeology: from Knossos to Constantinople (Core)
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Classical Art and Archaeology: from Knossos to Constantinople (Core)

This module offers an introduction to the art and archaeology of the Classical world. Students have the opportunity to examine methods, themes and evidence relating to the ancient world through materials such as objects, art/visuals, architecture and archaeological remains, and learn how these can be used to make interpretations of society in the Greek and Roman worlds.

Students have the opportunity to engage with some of the most significant examples of material culture from the ancient world, and develop an understanding of the characters and artistic styles of different cultures and periods such as Minoan, Mycenaean, Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Etruscan, Archaic/early Roman, Republican, Imperial and Late Antique.

Classical Literature: from Troy to the Silver Age (Core)
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Classical Literature: from Troy to the Silver Age (Core)

This module introduces some of the Classical literature from Greek and Roman times. Students have the opportunity to engage with a selection of texts to develop an understanding of Greek and Roman society, culture and thought. Texts also serve to illustrate how the Classical world was in some ways similar, and in others dramatically different, to our own, and highlights some of the themes which continue to make it fascinating and inspiring to modern observers.

Critical Thinking and Writing (Core)
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Critical Thinking and Writing (Core)

This module aims to equip students with the skills necessary to communicate their learning in an academic environment, and also supports students in adjusting to the demands of higher education. The core objective of the module is to develop students’ critical thinking and writing skills.

Elementary Latin I (Core)
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Elementary Latin I (Core)

This module aims to provide an introduction to the basics of Latin for students with little to no prior experience of the language. Students can gain the ability to translate and interpret sentences and short passages in prose and verse with confidence. This can aid sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in translation, as well as in the original at higher levels of study.

Please note: those students with A-Level Latin or equivalent, subject to successfully sitting a diagnostic Latin test before the first term of their first year, may choose to take ‘The Medieval World’ or ‘Empire and After: Colonialism and its Consequences’ instead of this module, however, they are required to continue their language studies in Elementary Latin II.

Elementary Latin II (Core)
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Elementary Latin II (Core)

This module aims to provide a continued introduction to the basics of Latin for students with little to no prior experience of the language. Students can refine their ability to translate and interpret sentences and short to medium-length passages in prose and verse up to advanced difficulty. This can aid sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in translation, as well as in the original at higher levels of study.

Empire and After: Colonialism and its Consequences (Option)
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Empire and After: Colonialism and its Consequences (Option)

This module aims to provide students with a survey of imperial histories, at the same time as introducing some key conceptual and analytical tools for understanding the history of colonialism in a variety of pre-modern and modern contexts, from the perspectives of both colonisers and colonised.

The Greek World (Core)
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The Greek World (Core)

This module introduces students to the history of ancient Greece in the archaic and classical periods. Students will examine the emergence of Greek societies and city states (poleis), the various invasions of Greece by the Persians and their defeats at Marathon, Salamis and Plataea, competition between Athens and Sparta. The module emphasises how different primary sources can be applied to the study of the archaic and classical Greek world, as well as considering different scholarly interpretations of these periods.

The Historian’s Craft (Core)
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The Historian’s Craft (Core)

This module is designed to enable students’ to develop their research skills in history and their understanding of research as a process of inquiry. Students have the opportunity to deepen skills developed in the first term, such as essay writing in history and information literacy, by working alongside staff from the School in analysing primary and secondary sources relating to specific approaches to History.

The Medieval World (Option)
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The Medieval World (Option)

This module offers an introduction to the sources, approaches and methods necessary for the study of the medieval world. Lectures provide a survey of key moments in medieval history from 300-1500, structured around the research specialisms of the module teaching team. The module focuses on issues of religion and power in the Middle Ages, while there is a strong methodological focus on the materiality of the medieval period.

The Roman World (Core)
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The Roman World (Core)

This module surveys the political, social, economic and cultural history of the Roman world as a complex conversation amongst written, material and visual evidence, each not only supplementing the others but often contributing new and otherwise unheard voices. We will explore the experiences of living, dying, working and worshipping in the Roman world from the earliest evidence for the city of Rome to the diverse cultures of far-flung provinces. Through an examination of the dynamic and varied evidence of art, archaeology, architecture, epigraphy and ancient histories, we will discover and question what it meant to live under the rule of Rome.

Archaeology (Option)
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Archaeology (Option)

Archaeologists record, excavate and analyse the material evidence of our past to illuminate aspects of human life not otherwise recorded. In this module students will have the opportunity to take part in an excavation and will learn how to collect, interpret and care for archaeological evidence.

Art and Power: Projecting Authority in the Renaissance World (Option)
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Art and Power: Projecting Authority in the Renaissance World (Option)

Renaissance monarchs often employed artistic display to project royal authority. Ruling elites commissioned pieces of art not only for the embellishment of their residences, but also as a suitable vehicle to display authority. Kings and Queens commissioned tapestries, sculptures, royal palaces, or lavishly decorated printed books that narrated their achievements and omitted their failures. This module examines the diverse ways rulers and their entourage imagined and created an image of kingship through the visual arts.

Arthur and His Court (Option)
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Arthur and His Court (Option)

This module examines Arthurian narratives, myths, and traditions within a variety of contexts and media, and traces a variety of themes associated with Arthur and his court, including history and national identity; violence; kingship and rule; loyalty and betrayal; and love, sex, and gender roles.

Students will be expected to assess the importance of a myth that spans more than a millennium and address how medieval texts made meaning within their specific socio-cultural situations, as well as how later periods make meaning through their deployment of the medieval in new contexts.

Britons and Romans, 100 BC-AD 450 (Option)
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Britons and Romans, 100 BC-AD 450 (Option)

This module examines how and why the culture of Britain changed in the period of increasing contact with, and eventual incorporation into, the Roman Empire. Examining the key material, behavioural, ideological and structural changes to society in the period c. 100 BC to AD 450, it will question to what degree each aspect was a wholesale incorporation of ‘foreign’ ideas, technologies and goods, a local interpretation and adoption of these importations into an existing social system, or a local creation that was distinctly Romano-British, if often termed ‘Roman’.

Classics in Context (Core)
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Classics in Context (Core)

This module gives students the opportunity to read one text (in translation) closely and discuss sections each week with a tutor. It offers the opportunity to develop skills in textual analysis, including researching an author; assessing the intended audience; and considering the social/political context, the significance of genre and style, and other factors in how we interpret and understand a text. Students also compare and critique research that has used the text and explore the possibilities it has to serve as primary evidence for the study of the ancient world.

Digital Heritage (Option)
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Digital Heritage (Option)

The cultural heritage sector increasingly offers opportunities for the application of digital technologies as communication, research and recording tools. This module enables students to become familiar with some of these advanced recording techniques for the study and recording of objects.

Dissertations and Beyond: Classical Studies Stream (Core)
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Dissertations and Beyond: Classical Studies Stream (Core)

This module aims to provide a framework for career planning and preparing for the world of work, and forms part of the University’s skills and capabilities curriculum at level 2. It provides the opportunity for students to develop the management skills needed for independent study, which is a compulsory part of level 3 study, and to begin to form a research strategy for the Classical Studies independent study later in the course.

Elementary Greek I (Option)
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Elementary Greek I (Option)

This module aims to provide an introduction to the basics of Greek for students with little to no prior experience of the language. Students can gain the ability to translate and interpret sentences and short passages in prose and verse up to intermediate difficulty. This can aid sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in translation, as well as in the original at higher levels of study.

Elementary Greek II (Option)
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Elementary Greek II (Option)

This module aims to provide a continued introduction to the basics of Greek for students with little to no prior experience of the language. Students can refine their ability to translate and interpret sentences and short to medium-length passages in prose and verse up to advanced difficulty. This helps develop a foundation for sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world in translation, as well as in the original at higher levels of study.

Imperial Cities of the Early Modern World. (Option)
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Imperial Cities of the Early Modern World. (Option)

One of the ways in which early modern monarchs and rulers legitimised their authority and projected their power was through architecture and urban design. In this period capital cities across Europe, America and Asia were embellished with architecture and urban design inspired by Renaissance ideals of social order. This module examines the ways rulers imagined and built a number of imperial capital cities across Europe, America and Asia.

Intermediate Latin I: Prose (Option)
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Intermediate Latin I: Prose (Option)

This module aims to consolidate students' knowledge of the principles of the Latin language through sustained reading of substantial extracts from a variety of prose authors. Classes are structured around guided translation and interpretation of select set texts by Caesar, Cicero and Livy, while commentary focuses on points of grammar, syntax and vocabulary, as well as of historical context and significance. This is designed to provide experience in sensitive reading of primary sources from the Classical world as a foundation for original research.

Intermediate Latin II: Verse (Option)
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Intermediate Latin II: Verse (Option)

Students can consolidate their knowledge of the principles of the Latin language through sustained reading of substantial extracts from a variety of verse authors. Classes are structured around guided translation and interpretation of select set texts by Catullus, Virgil and Ovid, while commentary will focus on points of grammar, syntax and vocabulary, as well as of historical context and significance. Students can acquire a familiarity with metre and scansion in Latin poetry.

Introduction to Exhibitions, Curatorship and Curatorial Practices (Option)
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Introduction to Exhibitions, Curatorship and Curatorial Practices (Option)

This module introduces students to the understanding of exhibitions and curatorial practices. Following an introduction on the history of collections and museums, the course will explore the many issues related to the display of art and objects. It combines the study of theoretical approaches and the analysis of relevant case studies, and considers topics related to audiences for museums and exhibitions, the presentation and explanation of artefacts and artworks, and the new opportunities offered by digital technologies.

Latin Literature in the Late Republic and Augustan Age (Option)
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Latin Literature in the Late Republic and Augustan Age (Option)

This module explores a broad sampling of major genres and authors, and aims to provide a basis for further study and enjoyment of Latin literature. Focusing on writers active between 90 BC and AD 14, often referred to as the Golden Age, we shall examine how the literature of this period bears witness to contemporary social, political and cultural transformations.

All texts will be read in English translation, though opportunities to read or translate from the original Latin will be available for interested students. This module is intended as a successor to the core first-year survey of Classical Literature.

Living and dying in the middle ages, 800-1400 (Option)
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Living and dying in the middle ages, 800-1400 (Option)

How did people live and die in the middle ages? Drawing on the research expertise of the medievalists in the School, the module seeks to answer this question by addressing key themes relating to the life cycles of medieval people, from their childhood and education, via the roles that they took on in life (within families and in public; peaceful and violent), to their deaths. We will address primary sources that provide intimate insights into the everyday lives of medieval people: letters and autobiographies. Such sources will be contrasted with those that offer a more 'top-down' vision of how medieval society should function, such as rulebooks and conduct manuals. Finally, we will explore how people in the medieval period managed their material and spiritual interests through transactions recorded in documents such as charters and wills. A key aim of the module is to develop your research and writing skills by providing you with an opportunity to produce an extended piece of research. This, coupled with the intensive work with primary sources, will equip you to tackle a final year independent study in a wide range of medieval topics.

Powerful Bodies: Saints and Relics during the Middle Ages (Option)
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Powerful Bodies: Saints and Relics during the Middle Ages (Option)

This module investigates the matter of sanctity during the middle ages, focusing in particular on two different aspects: the construction of the memory of saints, through texts, images and architecture, and the crucial role of their mortal remains. Spanning from the fourth to the fourteenth Century, this module offers not only a general approach to the phenomenon of sanctity, but also detailed analysis of different case studies, from early Christian saints and their commemoration in martyria to Romanesque shrines in France and Italy. The module then considers the phenomenon of new saints, through discussion of the celebrated site of Saint Francis’s burial, San Francesco, in Assisi. Students can explore the case of Saint Hugh of Lincoln, discussing how his memory was preserved in the text of his life and how his canonization was mirrored in the very fabric of Lincoln Cathedral.

Renaissance Literature (Option)
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Renaissance Literature (Option)

Students studying Renaissance Literature have the opportunity to look in detail at a range of texts from the late Elizabethan period to the mid-1630s, including work by Shakespeare, John Donne, Ben Jonson and Mary Wroth. They also have the chance to explore the historical and cultural contexts in which these texts were produced, and the effects that they had on the politics and culture of the British Isles in the period. Lectures aim to examine post-Reformation England and late humanism, patronage, gender relations, early modern literary theory, education and philosophy.

Renaissances (Option)
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Renaissances (Option)

This module explores cultural renaissances in Europe and beyond. Students can examine the survival, imitation and revival of classical models from ancient Greece and Rome from late antiquity to the modern period. We engage with historical debates on the issue of periodisation and ask how and why cycles of decline and renewal continue to shape our understanding of the past.

Restoration Literature (Option)
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Restoration Literature (Option)

Students taking Restoration Literature, the companion module to Renaissance Literature, can study in detail a range of texts written between the era of the English Civil War and the first decade of the eighteenth Century, including work by John Milton; Andrew Marvell; Aphra Behn; and John Wilmot, the 2nd Earl of Rochester. Students have the opportunity to also study the historical and cultural contexts in which these texts were produced. Lectures aim to examine the origins and effects of the civil war, the ethics of rebellion and reform, the Restoration theatre, religious controversies, gender relations, developing philosophical thought and Restoration manners.

Salvation and Damnation, 600-1750 (Option)
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Salvation and Damnation, 600-1750 (Option)

Concern with, and ideas about, the supernatural influenced all areas of life for medieval and early modern men and women, and cut across all levels of society. In an age where religion was a state concern, many of these concerns were articulated or shaped within the context of the Church, all across Western Europe, yet throughout our period religious life was characterised by its great diversity. This module examines changing religious practices and beliefs in Europe, although with a particular focus on England, from the early Middle Ages until the seventeenth century, charting continuity and change in people’s thinking about their relationship – both individually and collectively - with the divine. The module is divided into three blocks: (1) early medieval, in which we explore the adoption of Christianity as a state religion, the slow emergence of an institutional church, missionary and conversion activities, and campaigns against heresy; (2) high to late medieval where we examine the tension between the theology of the church and the beliefs of the individual in a time of increased attempts at centralisation by the Western Church; (3) early modern, from the Reformation, via the Civil War, to early eighteenth-century rational religion and alternative versions of spirituality, and their impact on attitudes to religious and other minority groups.

Study Period Abroad: Classical Studies Stream (Option)
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Study Period Abroad: Classical Studies Stream (Option)

Classical Studies students have the opportunity to spend a term studying at one of the University’s partner institutions in North America or Europe where they undertake a course load of equivalent standard to that of the programme at Lincoln.

Studying abroad offers unique opportunities for personal development. It offers enhanced sporting, cultural, and other activities to enhance your overall profile, alongside experience of adapting to and working effectively within a different academic culture.

Students must obtain a 2:1 or higher at Level 1 in order to be considered for participation in the exchange. Students must complete a 500-word essay explaining why they wish to participate and may be required to attend an interview. A limited number of places will be available each year, and participation is at the discretion of the module coordinator and the Programme Leader.

Teaching History: designing and delivering learning in theory and practice (Option)
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Teaching History: designing and delivering learning in theory and practice (Option)

Teaching History deepens students' understanding of the practice of teaching history in the classroom. The module encourages students, especially but not exclusively those who may be considering a career in education (or related industries), to think more deeply about pedagogic theory and teaching practice. Students will be given the opportunity to gain some practical experience in instructing their peers and online audiences. There will be a strong focus on reflecting on prior learning experiences and the module will begin by providing students with an overview of the history of history teaching. History teaching will be examined at primary and secondary level, and in other educational contexts.

The Classical Tradition: from Medieval to Modern (Core)
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The Classical Tradition: from Medieval to Modern (Core)

Students can gain an introduction to the historical and archaeological sources, approaches and methods necessary for the study of the ancient world. Lectures provide a survey of key moments in history, 1000 BC-AD 400, structured around the research specialisms of the module teaching team.

The Emperor in the Roman World (Option)
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The Emperor in the Roman World (Option)

This module surveys the history of the Roman Empire not as a succession of emperors and achievements, victories and defeats, but as a complex of experiments in government and of attitudes to governance. Beginning with the transition from representative republican rule to the domination of an imperial dynasty and its network of élite dependants in the early first century, and concluding with the incipient takeover of this system by a newly Christianised ruling class in the early fourth century, students can explore the role of the emperor in the Roman world and the patterns of communication between him and his subjects.

The Forgotten Revolution? The Emergence of Feudal Europe (Option)
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The Forgotten Revolution? The Emergence of Feudal Europe (Option)

Almost all historians share the view that the social, economic and political structures of Europe in 1000 A.D. were significantly different to those that characterised the western superpower of Late Antiquity, the Roman Empire. In this challenging module, students will be encouraged to engage with a range of source material that will allow them to come to their own conclusions. Given this wide focus, students will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the fascinating story of post-Carolingian Europe in such a way that they enhance their abilities to think comparatively, a crucial weapon in the historian’s armoury.

The Hellenistic World: from Alexander to Actium (Option)
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The Hellenistic World: from Alexander to Actium (Option)

This module provides a survey of the history and archaeology of the eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East between the reign of Alexander the Great and the death of Cleopatra VII after the Roman victory at the Battle of Actium in 30 BC. Students will have the opportunity to explore the political histories, power structures, cultural developments, economic processes and shifting ideologies associated with the major Hellenistic kingdoms and ending with the Roman conquest of the eastern Mediterranean region. Teaching also considers how the Hellenistic period was a time of innovation, cultural connectivity, even globalisation, laying the foundations of a Hellenized world of city-states which endured into and defined the Roman construction of a world empire in its aftermath.

The Rise of Islam: Religion, culture and war in the Middle East (Option)
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The Rise of Islam: Religion, culture and war in the Middle East (Option)

The victories of Arab armies over the forces of the Byzantine and Persian Empires in the seventh century were of monumental importance. Not only did they signal the decline of the two great superpowers of the late ancient world but they were accompanied, some scholars would argue caused, by the rise of a new monotheistic world religion: Islam. The first half of the module seeks to understand the conquests of the Arab armies and the emergence of Islam historically and culturally, in two specific contexts: (1) political conflict between the Persian and Byzantine Empires, during which Arabia often acted as a military frontier and different Arab groups as allies to one side or another; (2) contact and competition between Christianity, Judaism and other religious traditions in Arabia. The second half of the module explores how, after the initial victories over the Byzantine and Persian Empires, the new Islamic polity renewed itself, rolled forward further conquests, and focuses in particular on how an ‘Islamic’ culture was formed.

The World of Late Antiquity, 150-750 (Option)
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The World of Late Antiquity, 150-750 (Option)

This module aims to develop students' understanding of the political, social and cultural history of Late Antiquity (150-750), with a particular focus on two world-changing religious developments: the rise of Christianity and Islam. Although the geographical focus of our studies will be on eastern Mediterranean lands of an empire ruled from Constantinople, known to later scholars as the Byzantine Empire, the geographical range of the module will be wide and include western Europe, including the western Mediterranean, Persia, Arabia, and ‘barbarian’ territories beyond the Roman frontiers on the Rhine and Danube.

Understanding Practical Making (Option)
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Understanding Practical Making (Option)

This module is designed to introduce the basic skills of working with glass, ceramic and fine metalwork. It provides an opportunity to investigate the potential and limitations of working with various materials, processes and techniques, associated with the practice of object manufacture against a relevant historical background.

Urban Life and Society in the Middle Ages (Option)
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Urban Life and Society in the Middle Ages (Option)

Between the 11th and the 12th centuries Europe went through some radical changes. This module will focus on case studies, such as Lincoln, London and Paris, among others. Students will have the opportunity to study how and why such centres grew from small towns to some of the greatest and most vibrant metropolis of Western Europe in the Middle Ages. For a comparative study, a range of primary sources will be taken into account, including contemporary descriptions of these cities and their inhabitants, historical records, art and architecture.

Village detectives: Unearthing new histories (Option)
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Village detectives: Unearthing new histories (Option)

The typical image of a rural village, whether a chocolate box idyll prettily nestled around its church or a commuter dormitory boringly empty of anything fun to do, rarely shows much evidence for anything dramatic. However, these places were created by people who lived through events which are almost unimaginable to us today including the Norman Conquest and the Black Death, and for whom a perpetual challenge was simply surviving in a period where barely half of those born lived to adulthood. In this module students will have the opportunity to learn how to critically analyse and interpret historical and archaeological evidence and to use their knowledge and skills to write a new history of any rural settlement of their choice.

Women in Ancient Rome (Option)
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Women in Ancient Rome (Option)

This module introduces students to the lives and experiences of women in the ancient world. By engaging with a wide range of material, visual and written evidence, students can investigate both the real historical circumstances of women’s lives and the ways in which they were constructed, represented and perceived.

The focus of this module is on the Roman world, and the material considered ranges in date from the Republican period to the end of the second Century AD. Material from Greece, especially where it affects Roman art, literature and ideas, will also be considered.

A Tale of Two Cities in Medieval Spain: From Toledo to Córdoba (Option)
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A Tale of Two Cities in Medieval Spain: From Toledo to Córdoba (Option)

In this module, students will have the opportunity to take a vivid and intellectually exciting journey through primary and secondary sources in order to understand the historical trajectory of the Iberian Peninsula from the end of the sixth century to the collapse of the Caliphate of Córdoba in 1031. The aim of the module is to provide an introduction to two major medieval cities, Toledo and Córdoba, via acquaintance with and discussion of material that allows us to reflect upon a fascinating complex of problems.

Advanced Latin I: Prose Author (Option)
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Advanced Latin I: Prose Author (Option)

This module aims to refine and extend students' mastery of the Latin language through focused reading of unadapted extracts from a single prose author. Classes will be structured around guided translation and interpretation of set passages, while commentary will encompass points of grammar, syntax and vocabulary; peculiarities of authorial style in the context of other major writers; historical situation and significance; and major studies of the author and text.

Advanced Latin II: Verse Author (Option)
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Advanced Latin II: Verse Author (Option)

This module aims to refine and extend students' mastery of the Latin language through focussed reading of unadapted extracts from a single verse author chosen according to available staff expertise and interest (e.g. Martial). Classes will be structured around guided translation and interpretation of set passages, while commentary will encompass: (1) points of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary; (2) questions of metre and scansion; (3) peculiarities of authorial style, in the context of other major writers and the rules of versification; (4) historical situation and significance; (5) major studies of the author and text. This will offer further practical experience of reading primary sources from the Classical world in the original for the purpose of original research in dialogue with relevant scholarship.

Ancient Graffiti (Option)
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Ancient Graffiti (Option)

This module explores a key resource for understanding the thoughts, feelings and conversations of ancient people. Graffiti in Greek and Latin (and other languages) were marked onto fixed and portable surfaces throughout the ancient Mediterranean world, and their informal and non-official nature offers a unique window into the lives and worldviews of people often invisible or marginal in standard documentary, literary and material sources

Chivalry in Medieval Europe (Option)
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Chivalry in Medieval Europe (Option)

This module examines both the birth and development of the concept of chivalry in the Middle Ages. Students can use a wide range of primary sources, as well as medieval and contemporary historiography, to explore how the role, image and function of medieval knights evolved over time.

Classical Commentary I (Core)
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Classical Commentary I (Core)

This module gives students the opportunity to analyse one text or author; object, assemblage or collection; structure or site, according to their own research interests (the evidence chosen will be agreed at the start of the term). Paired with a tutor, each student can examine the evidence closely, find and read related research publications, and discuss each week. This builds on the skills developed at Level 2 and provides students with the opportunity to direct their own learning, engage closely with primary sources, develop skills in analysis and critical thinking, and broaden their knowledge of the evidence and methods of studying the ancient world.

Classical Commentary II (Core)
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Classical Commentary II (Core)

Students have the opportunity to analyse one text or author; object, assemblage or collection; structure or site, according to their own research interests (chosen and agreed at the start of the term). Paired with a tutor, each student can examine the evidence closely, find and read related research publications, and discuss each week. This provides students with the opportunity to direct their own learning, engage closely with primary sources, develop skills in analysis and critical thinking, and broaden their knowledge of the evidence and methods of studying the ancient world.

Curatorial Practice (Option)
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Curatorial Practice (Option)

This module will enable students to engage in the research and development of displays through the process of curating an exhibition for the museum or heritage sector. Students will select objects and structure this selection through an appropriate narrative. They will propose modes and examples of interpretation such as gallery text, audio or visual aids. The emphasis will be on developing knowledge and understanding of the role and responsibilities of the curator, and the project will enable students to evidence a focused and critically rigorous curatorial rationale.

History at the End of the World (Option)
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History at the End of the World (Option)

Historian, journalist, political commentator and gossip columnist Matthew Paris, monk of St Albans, wrote what is still one of our main sources for British history of the thirteenth century. This module looks at Matthew Paris’s Great Chronicle, considering both Matthew himself and what he tells us about thirteenth-century English society. Students have the opportunity to think about what history was in the thirteenth-century and about attitudes to foreigners and national identity; power and poverty; propaganda and fiction; and time, space and the apocalypse.

Independent Study: Classical Studies Stream (Core)
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Independent Study: Classical Studies Stream (Core)

This compulsory extended piece of work gives students the opportunity to demonstrate they have acquired the skills to undertake detailed and substantial subject-specific research and writing, founded on critical inquiry and analysis.

Intermediate Greek I: History and Philosophy (Option)
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Intermediate Greek I: History and Philosophy (Option)

This module aims to consolidate students' knowledge of and comfort with the principles of the Greek language through sustained reading of substantial extracts from a variety of prose authors. Classes will be structured around guided translation and interpretation of set texts in Attic dialect by Xenophon, Thucydides, Plato and Aristotle. Commentary focuses on points of grammar, syntax and vocabulary, as well as historical context and significance.

Intermediate Greek II: Drama and Poetry (Option)
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Intermediate Greek II: Drama and Poetry (Option)

This module aims to consolidate students' knowledge of and comfort with the principles of the Greek language through sustained reading of substantial extracts from a variety of verse authors. Classes will be structured around guided translation and interpretation of select set texts in Attic dialect by Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes, and in Ionic dialect by Homer. Commentary focuses on points of grammar, syntax and vocabulary, as well as historical context and significance. Students can also acquire a familiarity with metre and scansion in Greek poetry.

Latin Letter-Writing from the Republic to Late Antiquity (Option)
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Latin Letter-Writing from the Republic to Late Antiquity (Option)

This module explores the world of Latin epistolary culture from the late Republic to the early Patristic period of the fourth Century AD. The preservation of documentary letters on materials such as stone and papyrus offer a complementary perspective on the lives, experiences and concerns of ordinary men and women across the Mediterranean. Students can consider a wide range of letter types, including about trade and agriculture, introductions and recommendations (literary and otherwise), and epistolary poetry.

Making Militants: Teaching violence in late antiquity (Option)
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Making Militants: Teaching violence in late antiquity (Option)

Making Militants explores the role of violent teaching practices of various sorts in the making of men and women in Late Antiquity. Focusing on the fourth, fifth and sixth centuries, it addresses a pivotal period in the transition from the ancient to the medieval world, surveying the multiple small-scale arenas that made up the Late Antiquity – the household, the schoolroom, the barracks and the monastery. By close reading of letters, biographical accounts, rulebooks, speeches and a wide range of other sources, we consider how violent educative practices made people who were capable of operating in a changing, unpredictable and often dangerous world. The men and women who were made in such spaces were the products of a society that was fundamentally violent, their own violence a product of long-established socialisation practices rather than acts of anti-social deviance.

Objects of Empire: the material worlds of British colonialism (Option)
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Objects of Empire: the material worlds of British colonialism (Option)

This module will investigate the history of imperial Britain through material culture. The objects of study will range from trophies looted in battle and a drum transported with slaves to Virginia, to African sculpture depicting Europeans. Historians increasingly recognise the fresh insights that objects offer to major themes in imperial history such as gender, race and class. This module responds to these new academic developments and will use objects and their biographies to study key phases and themes in the history of the British Empire. Tracing the long history of such objects can enable us to explore how objects change meanings as they move through various colonial and post-colonial contexts.

Republicanism in Early Modern England, 1500-1700 (Option)
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Republicanism in Early Modern England, 1500-1700 (Option)

Although early modern England was a kingdom, governed by a monarch, many historians have claimed that there was a strong ‘republican’ undercurrent to Tudor and Stuart political thought. This module introduces students to the key approaches and methodologies of the history of ideas by focusing upon the various ways in which scholars have studied and conceptualised republicanism in early modern England and the ongoing debate surrounding the origin, content and influence of republican ideas in the period 1500-1700.

Roman Lincoln (Option)
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Roman Lincoln (Option)

This module explores the history, archaeology, visual and material culture of Roman Lincoln (Lindum Colonia), within the context of the provinces of Roman Britain. It is designed to provide students with the opportunity to handle and analyse objects from the Lincolnshire Archives and The Collection museum, to engage with the evidence that is visible in the modern city, to engage with excavation reports as primary evidence, and to consider how a military and urban centre was connected to rural sites, towns and the forts beyond.

Rome and Constantinople: Monuments and Memory, 200-1200 (Option)
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Rome and Constantinople: Monuments and Memory, 200-1200 (Option)

This module is devoted to two cities that were capitals of the Roman Empire, focusing on their monuments and how these were perceived and remembered over centuries. Rome and Constantinople, or Old Rome and New Rome as they came to be called in the East, were imperial cities where the most powerful figures – emperors and patriarchs, popes and saints – of antiquity and the Middle Ages built and destroyed, appropriated and reconfigured spaces, buildings and structures.

Rulers and Kings: Visualising Authority in Medieval Europe (Option)
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Rulers and Kings: Visualising Authority in Medieval Europe (Option)

This module investigates the nature of rulership during the middle ages, exploring how images and architecture served to visually define and articulate the authority of kings and rulers during the Middle Ages. The module will discuss in depth three different case studies: Charlemagne and the Holy Roman Empire; the Norman rulers of Southern Italy; Louis IX and the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris.

Sex, Texts and Politics: Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (Option)
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Sex, Texts and Politics: Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (Option)

This module concentrates on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, with a particular emphasis on The Canterbury Tales, perhaps Chaucer’s most famous work.

Students will have the opportunity to examine the General Prologue and a variety of tales in relation to their historical context and literary antecedents, and, throughout, specific attention will be given to questions of genre (ranging from fable and epic to satire and romance), literary authority, narrative construction, and medieval aesthetics.

The Byzantine World, c.750-c.1500 (Option)
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The Byzantine World, c.750-c.1500 (Option)

This module is devoted to developing an understanding of the political, social and cultural history of the Byzantine World (c. CE 750-c. 1500), with a particular focus on institutions (for example the imperial office, monasteries), practices (warfare, diplomacy, ritual and ceremonial) and material resources (coinage, silks, 'Greek fire'). Byzantine art and architecture, literature and theology, will be studied in addressing aspects of the culture and ideology of the empire.

The Goths: Barbarians through history? (Option)
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The Goths: Barbarians through history? (Option)

This module explores two inter-related questions: Who were the Goths of late antiquity? Why have ideas of ‘Gothic-ness’ recurred so frequently since the end of the last Gothic kingdom in 711 CE? The module analyses historical, archaeological and other evidence for the Goths, their migration into Roman territory and their eventual settlement in Gaul, Spain and Italy in the third to eighth centuries. Drawing on the most recent scholarship, students will have the chance to challenge assumptions that the Goths were archetypal barbarians and caused the fall of the Roman Empire in the West and the dawn of a ‘dark age’.

The Roman City (Option)
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The Roman City (Option)

To the citizens of the Roman world, civility (civilitas) – right conduct of government, sound behaviour of individuals, citizenship itself – was a function of the city (civitas), which constituted the centre of the Roman state and society. This module will take students on a guided tour of the Roman city, using each stop along the way as a point of entry into one or more aspects of the politics, society, economy, and culture of Rome and its empire. Students will be challenged to reimagine urban life via a detailed engagement with a representative array of written, material, and visual sources and the main lines of the secondary literature.

The Roman Countryside (Option)
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The Roman Countryside (Option)

Before the Roman invasion of AD 43, everyone in Britain lived in ‘the countryside’, for the simple reason that there were no cities or towns. Indeed, throughout the four centuries of Roman rule which followed, the vast majority of people still lived outside of urban and military centres. The core objective of this module is an archaeological exploration of the great diversity of evidence, analysing the significance of the changing nature of rural society and the creation of rural landscapes and identities, focusing on Britain from the late pre-Roman Iron Age, through the Roman period, to its sub-Roman aftermath (c. 100 BC–AD 500).

The Vikings in the North Atlantic: Living at the Fringes of Medieval Europe (Option)
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The Vikings in the North Atlantic: Living at the Fringes of Medieval Europe (Option)

The image of Vikings from the north plundering their way across Europe is firmly fixed in popular imagination. Few people stop to think that the same people were also farmers, the heads of families and had home lives. The historical sources for the Vikings in the North Atlantic are pitifully few – a small number of sagas and a few other records. We often know more about the Vikings from those with whom they came into contact than from their own accounts.

This module integrates the different lines of evidence – historical, archaeological and environmental – and evaluates whether the idea of a ‘Viking world’ is a useful approach. Students can gain an introduction to texts in translation and archaeological reports, and explore the main limitations of our understanding of the North Atlantic regions in this period.

What is the Renaissance? (Option)
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What is the Renaissance? (Option)

This module aims to explore the intellectual and cultural achievements of the Renaissance, as well as its historiographic context. The period of transition from 'medieval' to 'modern' society that the Renaissance represents (or has been characterised as representing) is one of the most challenging areas of historical study, profoundly influencing historiography. Students have the opportunity to examine in depth to what extent the historical periodisation of the 'Renaissance' has been a deliberate, although sometimes contentious, means to better understand events of the past, particularly in relation to cultural analysis.

Work Placement: Classical Studies Stream (Option)
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Work Placement: Classical Studies Stream (Option)

The module is designed to give students practical experience of the workplace. It is expected that students will define, plan and undertake a specific project. Students have the opportunity to gain experience and skills in a range of tasks appropriate to sector-specific professional roles.

Please note if you choose to undertake a work placement, preferably during the first term of the third year, both of your optional choices in the second term must be Classical Studies modules (excluding Medieval, Early Modern, Conservation, and Digital Heritage modules).

† Some courses may offer optional modules. The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment Feedback

University of Lincoln policy aims to ensure that academics return in-course assessments to students promptly and with detailed and constructive feedback – within 15 working days of the submission date. Students have the opportunity for further discussion of assessments in feedback hours with their tutors.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of relevant assessment methods include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical examinations, such as presentations or leadership of seminar discussion; and written examinations, including in-class language tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year.

Research

The research of our academic staff directly informs our teaching. The School of History and Heritage has particular strengths in Roman archaeology, late antique society and culture, early Christian visual and material culture, and Classical reception.
Staff maintain a prominent research profile through publication in leading journals and prestigious essay collections, attendance at and organisation of major national and international conferences, collaboration on national and international grants and projects, and as invited speakers or visiting fellows at other institutions, including leading universities, research centres and museums. Collaboration with The Collection, the archaeological museum of Lincoln, provides students with opportunities for hands-on learning.

Lincoln Conservation

Lincoln Conservation brings together research, teaching and commercial expertise in architectural paint research, and the digital and physical conservation of historic objects, decorative schemes and buildings. Its consultants have helped to inform the restoration of the Midland Grand Hotel (now known as the St Pancras Renaissance Hotel), the HMS Victory and Southwell Minster, amongst other historic sites.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Study Period Abroad (Year 2)

Classical Studies students have the opportunity to spend a semester studying at one of the University’s partner institutions in North America or Europe. This opportunity has both academic and personal development dimensions. In academic terms, during the semester abroad, students undertake a course load at the partner institution of equivalent standard to that of the semester B programme at Lincoln (North American placements) or semester A or B (European placements).

Participation in study abroad also offers unique opportunities for personal student development in the wider sense. Although you will be supported through the application process by the module coordinator and colleagues at the partner institution, much of the responsibility for organising your time abroad rests with you. In addition, study abroad can offer enhanced sporting and cultural activities, alongside the basic experience of adapting to, and working effectively within, a different academic culture.

Work Placement (Year 3)

Classical Studies students may have the opportunity to pursue a work placement in the summer between the second and third years of the course, with a dedicated module for write-up in semester A of third year. This module aims to enable students to gain practical experience of the workplace. Students will normally define, plan and undertake a specific project. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process. In addition, students will gain experience of a range of tasks appropriate to sector-specific professional skills.

Associated Costs

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport, accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Placements

Some courses offer students the opportunity to undertake placements. When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry (where available). Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

2018/19 UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £13,800 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,100 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 112 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also be required to have at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (or equivalent), including English.

EU and International students whose first language is not English will require English Language IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Unconditional Offer Scheme

The University of Lincoln Unconditional Offer Scheme has been created to identify outstanding undergraduate applicants who we think would excel at Lincoln and make a significant contribution to our academic community.

The University of Lincoln takes a holistic contextual view, looking at students in the round, including all the information supplied in their application and any additional relevant assessment required, such as a portfolio, or interview. The qualities required for success are therefore not exclusively academic, and students’ drive, ambition, creativity, and potential are important factors in those considered for the scheme.

Applicants selected for the scheme, who commit to the University of Lincoln as their first choice of university, will receive an unconditional offer. We expect students in receipt of an unconditional offer to continue to apply themselves in their studies, both at school and when they join our academic community here at Lincoln. In previous years students who were selected and joined through the Lincoln unconditional offer scheme have shown very good success rate in their studies.

Find out more about the Unconditional Offer Scheme

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.

Classical Studies - Programme Leaders

Dr Lacey Wallace and Dr Graham Barrett

Programme Leaders

Dr Wallace is Senior Lecturer in Roman History and Material Culture. She is a field archaeologist specialising in the later Iron Age and Roman period in northwest Europe, especially Roman Britain. Her research focusses on the origins of urbanism, rural settlement, social landscapes and digital methods in archaeology. Her current project (The Canterbury Hinterland Project) is a landscape survey examining the creation of social landscapes, rural (dis)continuity, and connectivity.

Dr Barrett is Senior Lecturer in Late Antiquity. His field of research is the archaeology of Latin literacy in the Iberian Peninsula and western Europe more generally: the written record of the past as a product of the society and culture which we as historians use it to describe. Working with the full range of surviving evidence, he charts continuities and changes in the contexts in which Latin was deployed as the defining element of the Roman legacy to the early medieval West.


Your Future Career

Classical Studies can enable students to develop skills in textual and visual analysis, reading closely, translating and interpreting, thinking critically and presenting complex information with clarity and authority.

Graduates in this discipline may find employment in museums and galleries, publishing and administration, teaching and research, but also in other areas such as advertising, consultancy and PR, and the administrative, managerial, media and financial sectors. Some may continue their study at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

A degree in Classical Studies provides students with highly transferable and marketable skills in close reading, analytical and critical thinking, translation, confidence in writing and speaking, independent research, teamwork, problem-solving, and synthesising and communicating complex information and ideas with clarity and authority.

Graduates in this discipline can go on to a wide variety of careers where these skills are valued. While some may enter into fields closely related to their degree expertise (e.g. research, teaching, archives, museums or galleries), others may find success in the publishing and media sectors, in a range of administrative and management roles, in business, consultancy, advertising, the civil service, finance and more. Some students may choose to continue their study of Classical Studies or Classics at postgraduate level, while others choose law conversion, a teaching qualification, or other professional training, to name only a few of the many possibilities opened up by a Classical Studies degree.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

Classical Studies - image alongside quote New

"Who on Earth is so careless or lazy that he would not wish to learn how and under what form of government almost all of the inhabited world was conquered and became subject to the rule of Rome in less than 53 years?"

Polybius, Histories 1.1.5

Facilities

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.

Students can study and research in the University's Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides more than 250,000 printed books and approximately 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.

The Collection, Lincoln's archaeological museum, and the Lincolnshire County Archives offer students opportunities to study ancient objects from the local area, conduct research and engage in hands-on learning.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.