MChem Forensic Chemistry

MChem Forensic Chemistry

95% of Forensic Chemistry graduates were in employment or further study within six months of finishing the course according to The latest Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey.

The Course

Forensic chemistry is the application of scientific knowledge and investigation to law enforcement. From identifying substances to analysing crime scenes, the skills of a forensic chemist often play a vital role in criminal investigations.

This course offers a comprehensive study of chemistry integrated with forensic specialisms, including DNA analysis, fire debris analysis and forensic toxicology, so students can develop an in-depth understanding of forensic chemistry and fundamental science.

For an MChem student, the study experience is extended through a full-year placement with one of the University’s industry or overseas partners, or in one of our research groups. Placements are conducted alongside advanced academic study, focusing on research frontiers in chemistry. Students are supported when finding and undertaking a placement.

The School of Chemistry takes a research-centred approach to teaching and learning, and students have the chance to work with academics on collaborative research projects.

The Course

Forensic chemistry is the application of scientific knowledge and investigation to law enforcement. From identifying substances to analysing crime scenes, the skills of a forensic chemist often play a vital role in criminal investigations.

This course offers a comprehensive study of chemistry integrated with forensic specialisms, including DNA analysis, fire debris analysis and forensic toxicology, so students can develop an in-depth understanding of forensic chemistry and fundamental science.

For an MChem student, the study experience is extended through a full-year placement with one of the University’s industry or overseas partners, or in one of our research groups. Placements are conducted alongside advanced academic study, focusing on research frontiers in chemistry. Students are supported when finding and undertaking a placement.

The School of Chemistry takes a research-centred approach to teaching and learning, and students have the chance to work with academics on collaborative research projects.

The course includes lectures, seminars, laboratory-based practical classes and lectures from visiting scientists.

The first year of this course aims to provide students with a foundation in chemistry, including laboratory work, mathematics and statistics, as well as the principles of forensic science and crime scene investigation.

In year two, students have the opportunity to explore more advanced aspects of forensic chemistry and are introduced to key areas of advanced crime scene methods and trace evidence.

In year three, students may choose from modules of personal interest, including fire and explosion investigation, nuclear forensics and bioterrorism and drugs of abuse.

In the MChem fourth year, students complete a full-year placement with one of the University’s industry or overseas partners, or in one of our research groups. Placements are conducted alongside advanced academic study, focusing on research frontiers in chemistry. Students are supported when finding and undertaking a placement. Costs that may be incurred from a placement are outlined in the Features tab.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Core Chemistry 1.1: Introduction to Energy, Change and Electronic Structure (Core)
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Core Chemistry 1.1: Introduction to Energy, Change and Electronic Structure (Core)

This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the main chemical principles behind the chemistry of elements, systems in equilibrium and chemical reactivity, with special emphasis in basic organic reactions.

Students will have the opportunity to learn basic concepts about elements and their main periodic properties and how some of these elements can be combined to produce molecules. Organic molecules will be used as an example to explain reactivity and how chemical structure can condition molecular properties. Energy transfers are also studied to understand the key role they play in chemical and physical transformations and how systems in equilibrium are affected by these.

Core Chemistry 1.2: Molecular Structure, Bonding and Mechanism (Core)
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Core Chemistry 1.2: Molecular Structure, Bonding and Mechanism (Core)

This module aims to introduce core chemistry concepts with an emphasis on chemical change. Movement and interaction of molecules and chemical kinetics are key physical chemistry topics covered and applied to chemical reactions of both organic and inorganic substances. The use of empirical data to develop and support laws, theories and models will be covered and how chemical kinetics can be used to develop reaction mechanisms. An introduction to crystallography and absorption spectroscopy is covered.

Crime Scene Investigation (Core)
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Crime Scene Investigation (Core)

This module is concerned with the skills required to protect, record, process and interpret a crime scene. Emphasis is placed on the role of crime scene investigation in the ‘forensic process’. The process of crime scene investigation is examined from scene preservation and recording (e.g. sketches and photography) to evidence recovery, packaging and documentation. The need for avoidance of contamination of the crime scene and for the subsequent continuity and integrity of the recovered evidence form an integral component of the module.

Introduction to Professional Practice (Core)
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Introduction to Professional Practice (Core)

This module aims to provide students with an overview of the application of chemistry in commercial and industrial contexts to underpin more detailed coverage in later models in this series.

The module aims to develop fundamental skills in mathematics and IT which will underpin their core chemistry modules. The module will also give students the opportunity to develop their transferable skills including knowledge of health and safety in the chemistry laboratory, effective communication in both written and oral form and group work.

Practical Chemistry 1.1: Fundamental laboratory techniques (Core)
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Practical Chemistry 1.1: Fundamental laboratory techniques (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the chemistry laboratory environment. The purpose of the module is to provide students with a platform which can be built upon in subsequent practical modules and equalise their potentially pre-university laboratory experience.

Within this module students can learn a portfolio of skills and be evaluated via competency based assessments. The module also covers best practice in health and safety in the laboratory environment as part of the series of key core concepts delivered in the module.

Practical Chemistry 1.2: Introduction to synthetic methodologies and molecular characterisation (Core)
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Practical Chemistry 1.2: Introduction to synthetic methodologies and molecular characterisation (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 1.1 and Core Chemistry 1.2.

The module will outline key organic, inorganic and physical chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range of experiments.

Professional Practice 1.2: Forensic Laboratory Analysis (Core)
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Professional Practice 1.2: Forensic Laboratory Analysis (Core)

This module will explain the process of forensic practice within the laboratory, including areas such as chain of custody, contemporaneous note taking, standard operating procedures and quality control. The module is therefore built around the principle that high quality forensic scientific evidence is not only about employing sound scientific methodology but is also dependent on the rigour of the procedures employed and the accurate reporting of results. It will also look to develop a range of transferable skills relating to scientific literature retrieval, understanding, and presentation, and allow students to further develop their mathematical and statistical skills.

Advanced Crime Scene Investigation (Core)
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Advanced Crime Scene Investigation (Core)

This module builds on the Crime Scene Investigation module and focuses on the application of advanced techniques for the detection, recovery, analysis and interpretation of a wide range of evidence found at a crime scene. Students can further develop their understanding of the role and responsibilities of the crime scene manager and the investigation of complex crime scenes, including key specialists and agencies to be involved. Within this context students will look at the need to follow ISO accredited procedures and the latest up to date working practices within crime scene investigation. As part of the module students are expected to undertake the examination of a complex crime scene.

Core Chemistry 2.1: Stability, Structure and Mechanism in Molecular Systems (Core)
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Core Chemistry 2.1: Stability, Structure and Mechanism in Molecular Systems (Core)

This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the physicochemical principles behind some of the main analytical techniques and how these can be applied to identify atomic and molecular structures in both inorganic and organic chemistry. It also offers an insight on advanced synthetic methods and how these techniques can be used to explain and interpret structure and reactivity of complex molecules, such as coordination and organometallic compounds.

Core Chemistry 2.2: Chemistry of Activated Systems and Radicals (Core)
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Core Chemistry 2.2: Chemistry of Activated Systems and Radicals (Core)

This module aims to further develop core chemistry concepts relating to chemical change. Electrochemistry is used to study thermodynamic properties of redox reactions as well as the kinetics of electrode processes. The kinetics of complex reactions builds upon the chemical kinetics material covered at level one. Bonding between metals and carbon is explored and further developed as the main group organometallics.

Practical Chemistry 2.1: Organic synthesis, purification and advanced characterisation (Core)
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Practical Chemistry 2.1: Organic synthesis, purification and advanced characterisation (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.1, with a strong focus on organic chemistry.

The module will outline essential complex organic chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities designed around multistep syntheses and reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range experiments.

Practical Chemistry 2.2: Inorganic synthesis and structural methods (Core)
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Practical Chemistry 2.2: Inorganic synthesis and structural methods (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.2, with a strong focus on inorganic and physical chemistry.

The module is constituted of a series of laboratory activities designed to familiarise students with an array of techniques centred around key aspects of inorganic syntheses. Specifically, the module emphasizes stability and speciation methods and their applications to the inorganic chemistry field. All aspects of the module will be supported by associated relevant analytical technologies.

Professional Practice 2.2: Quality Assurance and Regulation (Core)
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Professional Practice 2.2: Quality Assurance and Regulation (Core)

This module aims to provide students with an appreciation of regulation and quality assurance in forensic science and the role of the Forensic Regulator in this – key concepts in modern forensic science. Students can be introduced to method validation building on the underpinning statistical tools learnt in the previous professional practice modules. Students can also develop skills in the retrieval, critical review and communication of scientific literature and other published work.

Trace Evidence (Core)
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Trace Evidence (Core)

This module is designed to develop an understanding of the importance of trace materials, such as hair, fibres, glass and latent fingermarks, as evidence, their detection, recovery, analysis and the interpretation of results gained from these. The issues of transfer and persistence of such materials is also highlighted and the need to consider this throughout the above processes. Students will have the opportunity to be introduced to microscopy and analytical procedures and techniques relevant to the analysis of trace evidence.

Biological Chemistry (Option)
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Biological Chemistry (Option)

The Biological Chemistry module is taught across the disciplines of biology and chemistry and is designed to challenge and develop an awareness of multidiscipline research within students. The overarching aim is to encourage and develop a mode of thinking in students of how chemistry influences biological processes and how this can be exploited by industry and emerging fields.

Core Chemistry 3.1: Defining Shape, Symmetry and Stereochemistry (Core)
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Core Chemistry 3.1: Defining Shape, Symmetry and Stereochemistry (Core)

This module aims to provide deeper understanding on physicochemical principles behind materials and their properties, exploring advanced concepts in supramolecular chemistry and synthetic routes for more complex organic molecules. Crystals, colloids, discontinuous phases and solid state chemistry concepts are studied in depth to understand physical and chemical properties that give these materials a wide range of application in industry and research.

Core Chemistry 3.2: Heterogeneous Systems, Surfaces and Nanoscience (Core)
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Core Chemistry 3.2: Heterogeneous Systems, Surfaces and Nanoscience (Core)

This module covers in greater depth the thermodynamics and kinetics of processes occurring on solid surfaces. Heterogeneous catalysis is used as an example of how reactions at solid surfaces differ from those in the bulk. Electrochemistry is further developed. Organic chemistry topics are the advanced areas of radical chemistry and orbital symmetry along with heteroelement and organometallic synthesis. Concepts of supramolecular chemistry are covered.

Drugs of Abuse (Option)
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Drugs of Abuse (Option)

This module focuses on the area of drugs of abuse (controlled substances) and practical forensic applications. The module covers the legislation of controlled substances and precursor chemicals and the different types and classes of drugs.

Students will have the opportunity to learn about the laboratory analysis of drug samples for the purpose of identification, quantification and profiling and will undertake the role of a forensic drug chemist in an investigative laboratory practical. The synthesis of illicit drugs will be explored to gain an understanding of how this knowledge can be used in drug profiling.

Fire and Explosion Investigation (Option)
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Fire and Explosion Investigation (Option)

This module covers the techniques used to investigate origin and cause at fire and explosion scenes. Emphasis is placed on understanding the physics and chemistry of fire and explosion, scene investigation, sampling of scene debris and laboratory analysis.

Forensic Toxicology (Core)
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Forensic Toxicology (Core)

This module aims to provide a context for the chemical, physiological and analytical content introduced at levels one and two. The module explores poisons with an emphasis on drugs, relates dose to physiological effect and considers appropriate samples and laboratory techniques used in forensic toxicology. The unit also covers best practice in presenting evidence in documentary, visual and oral forms including mock-courts.

Global Security: Nuclear Forensics and Bioterrorism (Option)
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Global Security: Nuclear Forensics and Bioterrorism (Option)

This module considers the various aspects of both biological and nuclear terrorism, in the context of global security. The underpinning science and the forensic investigation of biological and nuclear materials for intelligence building is discussed.

Practical Chemistry 3.1: Advanced techniques in IO-chemistry (Core)
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Practical Chemistry 3.1: Advanced techniques in IO-chemistry (Core)

This module builds upon previous practical modules and provides a support for the illustration of the theory delivered in the Core chemistry 3.1 module.

The concept of this module is to offer students the opportunity to experience and dissect the process of designing a material which fulfils specific requirements or needs, its synthesis and its characterisation.
Through this process, the module offers the opportunity to host advanced complex organic syntheses (such as asymmetric synthesis) and supramolecular synthesis.

Additionally, the module introduces students to a series of stereoselective analytical techniques designed to characterise aforementioned materials.

Structured project (Core)
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Structured project (Core)

This module offers students the opportunity to undertake an independent programme of research under the supervision of a member of staff. It provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate original and critical thoughts as well as build practical and project-management skills.

Students may select a project from a series of proposals provided by staff, conduct a review of the literature, identify a hypothesis, and design a programme of research to test the hypothesis (under guidance from their supervisor). Students will be expected to manage the project including obtaining relevant ethical approval and conducting COSHH and risk assessments.

Students may analyse and interpret data which will be collected in the laboratory or the field, or using computational sources (e.g. software for mathematical modelling; the internet for the meta-analysis of pre-collected data).

The project will be written up either as a thesis or a scientific paper following closely defined criteria.

Advanced Forensic Toxicology (Option)
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Advanced Forensic Toxicology (Option)

In this module students have the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of the fate of toxins within the human body and the analysis of biological specimens that builds upon the knowledge gained from modules previously studied.

Laboratory work will be based upon case work and the development of new methods providing a realistic experience of the role of the forensic toxicologist in legal cases. Use of external practitioners, laboratory visits and specialist equipment aim to further add to this experience and strengthen the opportunity for employment in this highly competitive field.

Laboratory problems will be less directed and aim to further develop skills in teamwork and independent learning. Students are also expected to develop skills in interpretation of results and presentation in court, as expected for a professional forensic toxicologist within the present legal system. New method development will be backed up by consideration of research developments across all aspects of the field.

Fire and Explosions (Option)
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Fire and Explosions (Option)

Students have the opportunity to develop knowledge in the physics and chemistry of fire and explosions, which is then used to understand and interpret fire and explosion scenes. Case studies, fieldwork and laboratory work will provide the contexts for the knowledge delivered in lectures and workshops. Laboratory skills can be further developed from modules covered earlier in the course and emphasis will be placed on students working on professionally focused group and individual problems.

The professional and research literature will be a major information source that will inform module content and provide the context of the role of forensic scientists in fire and explosion investigation within the framework of the present legal system.

Method Development and Validation (Option)
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Method Development and Validation (Option)

This module comprises two main components:
The first will provide fundamental knowledge concerning strategies for Sampling, Data analysis, Reporting, Quality assurance and Quality control, Numerical and IT skills, and Safety in relation to analytical science.
The second will provide the general introductory principles and a theoretical understanding of a range of instrumental analytical techniques and their applications. The module aims to provide the background knowledge needed for an understanding of the various principles discussed in greater detail in other modules

Sensors in Forensic Science (Option)
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Sensors in Forensic Science (Option)

Students have the opportunity to acquire knowledge in the physics and chemistry behind the most common sensors used in forensic science and how they work. The module explores how sensors are an important part of data acquisition and how these can be used on their own or form part of more complicated devices. Applications on how sensors can assist in the analysis and determination of drugs and explosive residues will also be taught in this module. Students have the opportunity to learn how short and long range sensing can be used in forensic science to gather information for intelligence and court purposes and their analytical characteristics, which will greatly help to decide the most suitable for different specific applications. The module aims to help students understand the legal repercussions of their use and ethical implications.

Academic Research Project (Option)
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Academic Research Project (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to apply chemical knowledge and laboratory skills to an extended practical research study. It also provides the opportunity to further develop professional skills, including the use of online literature/chemical data searching; ability to critically review relevant published literature & written/oral presentation of research activities.

Commercial Research Project (Option)
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Commercial Research Project (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to apply chemical knowledge and laboratory skills to an extended practical research study within a commercial context. Students can further develop professional skills, incl. use of online literature/chemical data searching; ability to critically review relevant published literature and written/oral presentation of research activities.

Professional and Personal Development (Core)
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Professional and Personal Development (Core)

This module aims to develop systematic personal and professional development of a student in a specialist area of chemistry to enhance employability. This is achieved through development and execution of a personal learning plan designed using a process of self-reflection around five development themes: personal development; professional skills development; technical skills development; research interests; career development.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

The philosophy of the School of Chemistry is to combine fundamental research with a strong focus on industry relevance, working with companies to address real needs. From your first week, our programmes provide a hands-on approach, which we call ‘Student as Producer’. This initiative, at the centre of our teaching and learning, provides students with the chance to develop the professional skills required for their future career. The theoretical basis of chemistry is twinned with practical laboratory experience, whilst we also develop key industry skills including communications, problem solving and project management.

Our academic community provides a supportive and nurturing teaching environment. There is close interdepartmental collaboration with scientists in the other Schools within the College of Science, including Life Sciences, Pharmacy and Engineering. As a student here, you will have the opportunity to engage in real research and professional problem solving. Our research informs our teaching right from the start of your programme to enhance your learning experience.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Students on this course can undertake an 'end-on' full-year placement programme during the fourth year of the course. This industrial placement is an optional module that runs alongside teaching and forms part of the four year integrated Master’s. The fee for this is included within the tuition fee for that academic year.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBB, including grade B from A Level Chemistry.

International Baccalaureate: 30 points overall, with Higher Level Grade 5 in Chemistry.

BTEC Extended Diploma Forensic Science accepted. BTEC Extended Applied Science accepted, depending on modules studied: Distinction, Distinction, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma in a science subject accepted: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit, to include 15 credits from Chemistry, or above will be required.

We will also consider extensive, relevant work experience; please email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk with full details for further advice.

In addition, applicants must have at least 3 GCSEs at grade C or above in English, Maths and Science. Level 2 equivalent qualifications such as BTEC First Certificates and Level 2 Functional Skills will be considered.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/chemistry/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

The course includes lectures, seminars, laboratory-based practical classes and lectures from visiting scientists.

The first year of this course aims to provide students with a foundation in chemistry, including laboratory work, mathematics and statistics, as well as the principles of forensic science and crime scene investigation.

In year two, students have the opportunity to explore more advanced aspects of forensic chemistry and are introduced to key areas of advanced crime scene methods and trace evidence.

In year three, students may choose from modules of personal interest, including fire and explosion investigation, nuclear forensics and bioterrorism and drugs of abuse.

In the MChem fourth year, students complete a full-year placement with one of the University’s industry or overseas partners, or in one of our research groups. Placements are conducted alongside advanced academic study, focusing on research frontiers in chemistry. Students are supported when finding and undertaking a placement. Costs that may be incurred from a placement are outlined in the Features tab.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Core Chemistry 1.1: Introduction to Energy, Change and Electronic Structure (Core)
Find out more

Core Chemistry 1.1: Introduction to Energy, Change and Electronic Structure (Core)

This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the main chemical principles behind the chemistry of elements, systems in equilibrium and chemical reactivity, with special emphasis in basic organic reactions.

Students will have the opportunity to learn basic concepts about elements and their main periodic properties and how some of these elements can be combined to produce molecules. Organic molecules will be used as an example to explain reactivity and how chemical structure can condition molecular properties. Energy transfers are also studied to understand the key role they play in chemical and physical transformations and how systems in equilibrium are affected by these.

Core Chemistry 1.2: Molecular Structure, Bonding and Mechanism (Core)
Find out more

Core Chemistry 1.2: Molecular Structure, Bonding and Mechanism (Core)

This module aims to introduce core chemistry concepts with an emphasis on chemical change. Movement and interaction of molecules and chemical kinetics are key physical chemistry topics covered and applied to chemical reactions of both organic and inorganic substances. The use of empirical data to develop and support laws, theories and models will be covered and how chemical kinetics can be used to develop reaction mechanisms. An introduction to crystallography and absorption spectroscopy is covered.

Crime Scene Investigation (Core)
Find out more

Crime Scene Investigation (Core)

This module is concerned with the skills required to protect, record, process and interpret a crime scene. Emphasis is placed on the role of crime scene investigation in the ‘forensic process’. The process of crime scene investigation is examined from scene preservation and recording (e.g. sketches and photography) to evidence recovery, packaging and documentation. The need for avoidance of contamination of the crime scene and for the subsequent continuity and integrity of the recovered evidence form an integral component of the module.

Introduction to Professional Practice (Core)
Find out more

Introduction to Professional Practice (Core)

This module aims to provide students with an overview of the application of chemistry in commercial and industrial contexts to underpin more detailed coverage in later models in this series.

The module aims to develop fundamental skills in mathematics and IT which will underpin their core chemistry modules. The module will also give students the opportunity to develop their transferable skills including knowledge of health and safety in the chemistry laboratory, effective communication in both written and oral form and group work.

Practical Chemistry 1.1: Fundamental laboratory techniques (Core)
Find out more

Practical Chemistry 1.1: Fundamental laboratory techniques (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to the chemistry laboratory environment. The purpose of the module is to provide students with a platform which can be built upon in subsequent practical modules and equalise their potentially pre-university laboratory experience.

Within this module students can learn a portfolio of skills and be evaluated via competency based assessments. The module also covers best practice in health and safety in the laboratory environment as part of the series of key core concepts delivered in the module.

Practical Chemistry 1.2: Introduction to synthetic methodologies and molecular characterisation (Core)
Find out more

Practical Chemistry 1.2: Introduction to synthetic methodologies and molecular characterisation (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 1.1 and Core Chemistry 1.2.

The module will outline key organic, inorganic and physical chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range of experiments.

Professional Practice 1.2: Forensic Laboratory Analysis (Core)
Find out more

Professional Practice 1.2: Forensic Laboratory Analysis (Core)

This module will explain the process of forensic practice within the laboratory, including areas such as chain of custody, contemporaneous note taking, standard operating procedures and quality control. The module is therefore built around the principle that high quality forensic scientific evidence is not only about employing sound scientific methodology but is also dependent on the rigour of the procedures employed and the accurate reporting of results. It will also look to develop a range of transferable skills relating to scientific literature retrieval, understanding, and presentation, and allow students to further develop their mathematical and statistical skills.

Advanced Crime Scene Investigation (Core)
Find out more

Advanced Crime Scene Investigation (Core)

This module builds on the Crime Scene Investigation module and focuses on the application of advanced techniques for the detection, recovery, analysis and interpretation of a wide range of evidence found at a crime scene. Students can further develop their understanding of the role and responsibilities of the crime scene manager and the investigation of complex crime scenes, including key specialists and agencies to be involved. Within this context students will look at the need to follow ISO accredited procedures and the latest up to date working practices within crime scene investigation. As part of the module students are expected to undertake the examination of a complex crime scene.

Core Chemistry 2.1: Stability, Structure and Mechanism in Molecular Systems (Core)
Find out more

Core Chemistry 2.1: Stability, Structure and Mechanism in Molecular Systems (Core)

This module aims to provide a breadth core understanding of the physicochemical principles behind some of the main analytical techniques and how these can be applied to identify atomic and molecular structures in both inorganic and organic chemistry. It also offers an insight on advanced synthetic methods and how these techniques can be used to explain and interpret structure and reactivity of complex molecules, such as coordination and organometallic compounds.

Core Chemistry 2.2: Chemistry of Activated Systems and Radicals (Core)
Find out more

Core Chemistry 2.2: Chemistry of Activated Systems and Radicals (Core)

This module aims to further develop core chemistry concepts relating to chemical change. Electrochemistry is used to study thermodynamic properties of redox reactions as well as the kinetics of electrode processes. The kinetics of complex reactions builds upon the chemical kinetics material covered at level one. Bonding between metals and carbon is explored and further developed as the main group organometallics.

Practical Chemistry 2.1: Organic synthesis, purification and advanced characterisation (Core)
Find out more

Practical Chemistry 2.1: Organic synthesis, purification and advanced characterisation (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.1, with a strong focus on organic chemistry.

The module will outline essential complex organic chemistry concepts with a series of laboratory activities designed around multistep syntheses and reinforced by the use of relevant analytical techniques and tools throughout a range experiments.

Practical Chemistry 2.2: Inorganic synthesis and structural methods (Core)
Find out more

Practical Chemistry 2.2: Inorganic synthesis and structural methods (Core)

This module aims to provide students with the practical experience associated with the topics delivered in Core Chemistry 2.2, with a strong focus on inorganic and physical chemistry.

The module is constituted of a series of laboratory activities designed to familiarise students with an array of techniques centred around key aspects of inorganic syntheses. Specifically, the module emphasizes stability and speciation methods and their applications to the inorganic chemistry field. All aspects of the module will be supported by associated relevant analytical technologies.

Professional Practice 2.2: Quality Assurance and Regulation (Core)
Find out more

Professional Practice 2.2: Quality Assurance and Regulation (Core)

This module aims to provide students with an appreciation of regulation and quality assurance in forensic science and the role of the Forensic Regulator in this – key concepts in modern forensic science. Students can be introduced to method validation building on the underpinning statistical tools learnt in the previous professional practice modules. Students can also develop skills in the retrieval, critical review and communication of scientific literature and other published work.

Trace Evidence (Core)
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Trace Evidence (Core)

This module is designed to develop an understanding of the importance of trace materials, such as hair, fibres, glass and latent fingermarks, as evidence, their detection, recovery, analysis and the interpretation of results gained from these. The issues of transfer and persistence of such materials is also highlighted and the need to consider this throughout the above processes. Students will have the opportunity to be introduced to microscopy and analytical procedures and techniques relevant to the analysis of trace evidence.

Biological Chemistry (Option)
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Biological Chemistry (Option)

The Biological Chemistry module is taught across the disciplines of biology and chemistry and is designed to challenge and develop an awareness of multidiscipline research within students. The overarching aim is to encourage and develop a mode of thinking in students of how chemistry influences biological processes and how this can be exploited by industry and emerging fields.

Core Chemistry 3.1: Defining Shape, Symmetry and Stereochemistry (Core)
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Core Chemistry 3.1: Defining Shape, Symmetry and Stereochemistry (Core)

This module aims to provide deeper understanding on physicochemical principles behind materials and their properties, exploring advanced concepts in supramolecular chemistry and synthetic routes for more complex organic molecules. Crystals, colloids, discontinuous phases and solid state chemistry concepts are studied in depth to understand physical and chemical properties that give these materials a wide range of application in industry and research.

Core Chemistry 3.2: Heterogeneous Systems, Surfaces and Nanoscience (Core)
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Core Chemistry 3.2: Heterogeneous Systems, Surfaces and Nanoscience (Core)

This module covers in greater depth the thermodynamics and kinetics of processes occurring on solid surfaces. Heterogeneous catalysis is used as an example of how reactions at solid surfaces differ from those in the bulk. Electrochemistry is further developed. Organic chemistry topics are the advanced areas of radical chemistry and orbital symmetry along with heteroelement and organometallic synthesis. Concepts of supramolecular chemistry are covered.

Drugs of Abuse (Option)
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Drugs of Abuse (Option)

This module focuses on the area of drugs of abuse (controlled substances) and practical forensic applications. The module covers the legislation of controlled substances and precursor chemicals and the different types and classes of drugs.

Students will have the opportunity to learn about the laboratory analysis of drug samples for the purpose of identification, quantification and profiling and will undertake the role of a forensic drug chemist in an investigative laboratory practical. The synthesis of illicit drugs will be explored to gain an understanding of how this knowledge can be used in drug profiling.

Fire and Explosion Investigation (Option)
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Fire and Explosion Investigation (Option)

This module covers the techniques used to investigate origin and cause at fire and explosion scenes. Emphasis is placed on understanding the physics and chemistry of fire and explosion, scene investigation, sampling of scene debris and laboratory analysis.

Forensic Toxicology (Core)
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Forensic Toxicology (Core)

This module aims to provide a context for the chemical, physiological and analytical content introduced at levels one and two. The module explores poisons with an emphasis on drugs, relates dose to physiological effect and considers appropriate samples and laboratory techniques used in forensic toxicology. The unit also covers best practice in presenting evidence in documentary, visual and oral forms including mock-courts.

Global Security: Nuclear Forensics and Bioterrorism (Option)
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Global Security: Nuclear Forensics and Bioterrorism (Option)

This module considers the various aspects of both biological and nuclear terrorism, in the context of global security. The underpinning science and the forensic investigation of biological and nuclear materials for intelligence building is discussed.

Practical Chemistry 3.1: Advanced techniques in IO-chemistry (Core)
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Practical Chemistry 3.1: Advanced techniques in IO-chemistry (Core)

This module builds upon previous practical modules and provides a support for the illustration of the theory delivered in the Core chemistry 3.1 module.

The concept of this module is to offer students the opportunity to experience and dissect the process of designing a material which fulfils specific requirements or needs, its synthesis and its characterisation.
Through this process, the module offers the opportunity to host advanced complex organic syntheses (such as asymmetric synthesis) and supramolecular synthesis.

Additionally, the module introduces students to a series of stereoselective analytical techniques designed to characterise aforementioned materials.

Structured project (Core)
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Structured project (Core)

This module offers students the opportunity to undertake an independent programme of research under the supervision of a member of staff. It provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate original and critical thoughts as well as build practical and project-management skills.

Students may select a project from a series of proposals provided by staff, conduct a review of the literature, identify a hypothesis, and design a programme of research to test the hypothesis (under guidance from their supervisor). Students will be expected to manage the project including obtaining relevant ethical approval and conducting COSHH and risk assessments.

Students may analyse and interpret data which will be collected in the laboratory or the field, or using computational sources (e.g. software for mathematical modelling; the internet for the meta-analysis of pre-collected data).

The project will be written up either as a thesis or a scientific paper following closely defined criteria.

Advanced Forensic Toxicology (Option)
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Advanced Forensic Toxicology (Option)

In this module students have the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of the fate of toxins within the human body and the analysis of biological specimens that builds upon the knowledge gained from modules previously studied.

Laboratory work will be based upon case work and the development of new methods providing a realistic experience of the role of the forensic toxicologist in legal cases. Use of external practitioners, laboratory visits and specialist equipment aim to further add to this experience and strengthen the opportunity for employment in this highly competitive field.

Laboratory problems will be less directed and aim to further develop skills in teamwork and independent learning. Students are also expected to develop skills in interpretation of results and presentation in court, as expected for a professional forensic toxicologist within the present legal system. New method development will be backed up by consideration of research developments across all aspects of the field.

Fire and Explosions (Option)
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Fire and Explosions (Option)

Students have the opportunity to develop knowledge in the physics and chemistry of fire and explosions, which is then used to understand and interpret fire and explosion scenes. Case studies, fieldwork and laboratory work will provide the contexts for the knowledge delivered in lectures and workshops. Laboratory skills can be further developed from modules covered earlier in the course and emphasis will be placed on students working on professionally focused group and individual problems.

The professional and research literature will be a major information source that will inform module content and provide the context of the role of forensic scientists in fire and explosion investigation within the framework of the present legal system.

Method Development and Validation (Option)
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Method Development and Validation (Option)

This module comprises two main components:
The first will provide fundamental knowledge concerning strategies for Sampling, Data analysis, Reporting, Quality assurance and Quality control, Numerical and IT skills, and Safety in relation to analytical science.
The second will provide the general introductory principles and a theoretical understanding of a range of instrumental analytical techniques and their applications. The module aims to provide the background knowledge needed for an understanding of the various principles discussed in greater detail in other modules

Sensors in Forensic Science (Option)
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Sensors in Forensic Science (Option)

Students have the opportunity to acquire knowledge in the physics and chemistry behind the most common sensors used in forensic science and how they work. The module explores how sensors are an important part of data acquisition and how these can be used on their own or form part of more complicated devices. Applications on how sensors can assist in the analysis and determination of drugs and explosive residues will also be taught in this module. Students have the opportunity to learn how short and long range sensing can be used in forensic science to gather information for intelligence and court purposes and their analytical characteristics, which will greatly help to decide the most suitable for different specific applications. The module aims to help students understand the legal repercussions of their use and ethical implications.

Academic Research Project (Option)
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Academic Research Project (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to apply chemical knowledge and laboratory skills to an extended practical research study. It also provides the opportunity to further develop professional skills, including the use of online literature/chemical data searching; ability to critically review relevant published literature & written/oral presentation of research activities.

Commercial Research Project (Option)
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Commercial Research Project (Option)

This module provides students with the opportunity to apply chemical knowledge and laboratory skills to an extended practical research study within a commercial context. Students can further develop professional skills, incl. use of online literature/chemical data searching; ability to critically review relevant published literature and written/oral presentation of research activities.

Professional and Personal Development (Core)
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Professional and Personal Development (Core)

This module aims to develop systematic personal and professional development of a student in a specialist area of chemistry to enhance employability. This is achieved through development and execution of a personal learning plan designed using a process of self-reflection around five development themes: personal development; professional skills development; technical skills development; research interests; career development.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date (unless stated differently above)..

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

The philosophy of the School of Chemistry is to combine fundamental research with a strong focus on industry relevance, working with companies to address real needs. From your first week, our programmes provide a hands-on approach, which we call ‘Student as Producer’. This initiative, at the centre of our teaching and learning, provides students with the chance to develop the professional skills required for their future career. The theoretical basis of chemistry is twinned with practical laboratory experience, whilst we also develop key industry skills including communications, problem solving and project management.

Our academic community provides a supportive and nurturing teaching environment. There is close interdepartmental collaboration with scientists in the other Schools within the College of Science, including Life Sciences, Pharmacy and Engineering. As a student here, you will have the opportunity to engage in real research and professional problem solving. Our research informs our teaching right from the start of your programme to enhance your learning experience.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Placement Year

When students are on an optional placement in the UK or overseas or studying abroad, they will be required to cover their own transport and accommodation and meals costs. Placements can range from a few weeks to a full year if students choose to undertake an optional sandwich year in industry.

Students are encouraged to obtain placements in industry independently. Tutors may provide support and advice to students who require it during this process.

Tuition Fees

2018/19UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,600 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,900 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Students on this course can undertake an 'end-on' full-year placement programme during the fourth year of the course. This industrial placement is an optional module that runs alongside teaching and forms part of the four year integrated Master’s. The fee for this is included within the tuition fee for that academic year.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

Exceptionally tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBB, to include a grade B from A Level Chemistry.

International Baccalaureate: 30 points overall, with Higher Level Grade 5 in Chemistry.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science or Forensic Science*: Distinction, Distinction, Merit

*not all modules are accepted. Please contact our Admissions team for further information (admissions@lincoln.ac.uk)

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English, Maths and Science. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

EU and International students whose first language is not English will require English Language IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

For applicants who do not meet our standard entry requirements, our Science Foundation Year can provide an alternative route of entry onto our full degree programmes:

https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/course/sfysfyub/chemistry/

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may be supported in their learning by other students.

Expert Image - Tasnim Munshi

Tasnim Munshi

Programme Leader for Chemistry

Tasnim is responsibile for the management of all teaching provision within the School of Chemistry and leads activities surrounding student recruitment. Tasnim's specialisms are co-ordination chemistry, spectroscopy and inorganic chemistry.


Your Future Career

Forensic Chemistry graduates benefit from specialist skills and technical knowledge that are transferable to careers across chemistry, alongside opportunities in forensic laboratories and law enforcement organisations, such as police forces, HMRC and environmental health.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

Forensic Chemistry graduates benefit from specialist skills and technical knowledge that are transferable to careers across chemistry, alongside opportunities in forensic laboratories and law enforcement organisations, such as police forces, HMRC and environmental health.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.


Facilities

Students have access to the University’s Joseph Banks Laboratories and Science Building, which offer specialist laboratory and teaching spaces. High-specification equipment is available for NMR, mass spectrometry, chromatography, electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

A scene of crime house used by students and police professionals is located at our Riseholme Campus for training in crime scene examination and management. Rooms are configured to mimic a range of domestic incidents, with CCTV for student assessments. Riseholme is situated three miles outside of Lincoln. Where a module or field study taking place at this campus is an essential part of the course, transport for students is provided.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our undergraduates. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure students have access to specialist equipment and resources, to develop the skills, which they may need in their future career.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.