BSc (Hons) Business Psychology

BSc (Hons) Business Psychology

The University of Lincoln ranked 8th in the UK for overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2018 (out of 127 institutions).

The Course

Business Psychology is a field of study which aims to improve employees' wellbeing and performance and investigates how human aspects in workplace can help businesses become more effective and profitable.

The BSc (Hons) Business Psychology is a joint programme between the School of Psychology and the Lincoln International Business School and it seeks to enable students to enter the career market with specific knowledge, skills and attitudes to make successful work based decisions. All modules are carefully designed to enable students to take charge of their own learning and develop their understanding of the behaviour of people in business and how this can be applied in different organisational contexts. Students have the chance to be trained in methods and technologies that have been used to investigate psychological processes and learn how to make effective interventions.

As a business psychologist, you may be employed in public, private, and voluntary sector organisations. Possible careers include marketing, human resource management, organisation development, career counselling, coaching, and learning and development, as well as the option of academic research and teaching.

The Course

Business Psychology is a field of study which aims to improve employees' wellbeing and performance and investigates how human aspects in workplace can help businesses become more effective and profitable.

The BSc (Hons) Business Psychology is a joint programme between the School of Psychology and the Lincoln International Business School and it seeks to enable students to enter the career market with specific knowledge, skills and attitudes to make successful work based decisions. All modules are carefully designed to enable students to take charge of their own learning and develop their understanding of the behaviour of people in business and how this can be applied in different organisational contexts. Students have the chance to be trained in methods and technologies that have been used to investigate psychological processes and learn how to make effective interventions.

As a business psychologist, you may be employed in public, private, and voluntary sector organisations. Possible careers include marketing, human resource management, organisation development, career counselling, coaching, and learning and development, as well as the option of academic research and teaching.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Brain, Behaviour & Cognition (Core)
Find out more

Brain, Behaviour & Cognition (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to a wide range of topics outlining the structure and functions of the brain and nervous system, and the relationship between these brain structures and the behaviours, both covert and overt, resulting from them. The module serves as the foundation for the second year core module in cognition, and a number of elective modules expand on ideas introduced here.

Developing Individual in Society (Core)
Find out more

Developing Individual in Society (Core)

This module provides an introduction to three major areas of psychological theory and research, Developmental, Social and Individual psychology. The topics are covered in Semesters A and B respectively and grouped thematically. Content across all topics is embedded in the context of major, relevant general, developmental, social and individual differences theories.

Introduction to Business Psychology (Core)
Find out more

Introduction to Business Psychology (Core)

This module aims to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the study of individual’s behaviours, thoughts and emotions in business and organisational settings. The mainstream theories concerning business, work and organisational psychology will be presented along with the techniques deployed for research and practice. A greater emphasis will be placed on several topics varying from the most investigated psychological constructs to the range of skills and competencies valued by clients and employers in the job market.

Principles of Marketing (Core)
Find out more

Principles of Marketing (Core)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of marketing. Students will have the chance to examine the key concepts and issues of marketing.

The Business Professional (Core)
Find out more

The Business Professional (Core)

The Business Professional module provides an opportunity for students to learn about the Higher Education Environment and its connection to business. Throughout the module students will be exposed to a range of ideas that will be integral to their studies in business both from academics and business professionals. The module aims to enable students to develop transferable skills for academic study and work in a business environment.

Buyer Behaviour (Option)
Find out more

Buyer Behaviour (Option)

This module is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to understand what buyer behaviour is, why it is important for marketers and organisations; and how to initiate customer research activities to explore the increasing complexity of customer behaviour. The focus will be primary on consumer behaviour, but in addition important attention will be paid to business and organisational buyer behaviour.

Character Strengths and Virtues (Option)
Find out more

Character Strengths and Virtues (Option)

This module aims to offer students a critical introduction to the area of positive psychology referred to as character strengths and virtues. At the turn of the millennium positive psychology was launched with a multimillion dollar international research programme that aimed to identify the psychological strengths of character that are celebrated worldwide.

As a result the VIA (Values in Action) classification of strengths and virtues was published. It aimed to identify character strengths in the same way that psychiatric diagnostic systems classify psychological disorder. Since the publication of the classification handbook in 2004, the 24 strengths identified have been the subject of thousands of empirical studies across the planet.

Cross Cultural Management (Option)
Find out more

Cross Cultural Management (Option)

This module is designed for students who are thinking of a career in the international arena. It will be of use to anyone interested in working in multinationals or those interested in understanding how business is conducted across different cultures

New Ways of Working (Core)
Find out more

New Ways of Working (Core)

This 15-credit module aims to equip students with an understanding of the ways in which work is defined and experienced in the 21st century. There have been significant changes to the external business context in recent years driven by technology, changing customer demands, demography and globalization. Business psychologists can bring their understanding of people's behaviour, thoughts and emotions to the leadership and management of people engaged in work activities. Students will draw on much of the learning in the module Introduction to Business Psychology, applying psychological theories and techniques to this developing field.
Weekly workshops will enable students to understand how working patterns and practices have evolved over time and how management processes may differ depending on context. Students will be expected to develop their own analytical skills when reviewing real-life case studies of working practices.

Principles of Project Management (Option)
Find out more

Principles of Project Management (Option)

This module aims to provide a solid foundation in the theory and best practice of project management, with the aim of developing the practical skills of how to plan, implement and control projects. The module provides students with the chance to develop an understanding of the system perspective on management and a practically oriented introduction to the nature and purpose of project management and its key functions (scope, time, cost, quality, risk).

Psychological Assessment & Psychometrics (Core)
Find out more

Psychological Assessment & Psychometrics (Core)

The module aims to provide an introduction into psychological assessments using psychometrics, including questionnaires and scales. Based on the established theoretical and research context, this module will consider a range of assessment tools used in psychology to assess an individual’s behaviour or behavioural disposition, and provide an introduction into psychometric test development. The modules also aims to provide students with the opportunity to administer, score, and interpret psychological tests.

Research and Consultancy Methods (Core)
Find out more

Research and Consultancy Methods (Core)

This module explores various qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis. Students will have the chance to learn how to conduct, transcribe and analyse semi-structured and open-ended interviews and other forms of text. The principles and procedures of survey design and statistical modelling will also be discussed; students are expected to use appropriate computer-based statistical software, such as Stata, Eviews and SPSS, to analyse data.

Social Theories and Applications (Option)
Find out more

Social Theories and Applications (Option)

This optional module is designed to explore in greater depth some of the social psychological theories encountered on the degree programme. In this module, the issue of theory and application will be tackled in two ways. The early part of the module takes a series of human social behaviours as a start point and presents some of the competing theories that social psychologists have used to explain them. The later part of the module takes some of the social psychological theories as the start point and examines how successfully they have been applied to a series of human social behaviours.

Strategic Management (Option)
Find out more

Strategic Management (Option)

The overall objective of module is for students to understand and rigorously apply the principal concepts, analytical frameworks and techniques of strategic management.

Team Dynamics (Core)
Find out more

Team Dynamics (Core)

This 30-credit module aims to equip students with a broad understanding of group behaviour in an organisational setting. The ability to work effectively in a team and build positive relationships with clients and colleagues is integral to the work conducted by Business Psychologists. Throughout this module, students will be encouraged to think critically about research in this area, about their own practice, and the problems and issues they see in organisations.
In the first term, weekly workshops will introduce students to some of the important psychological processes which occur in groups. Practical exercises will be used to support students to develop and improve a range of skills vital to effective teamwork and expected by graduate employers. These include problem-solving, decision-making, interpersonal communication, conflict-resolution and project management skills as well as others associated with developing personal effectiveness and credibility at work.
In the second term, students will have the opportunity to apply these skills outside of the classroom by working in small teams on a community engagement learning project. Students will be supported through this process by a series of tutorials and workshops on project management. By the end of the module, students will have compiled a portfolio of reflections and evidence which can be used to inform the design of future teambuilding interventions.

Business Psychology in Practice (Core)
Find out more

Business Psychology in Practice (Core)

The 30-credit module Business Psychology in Practice will take an applied and evidence-based approach to exploring contemporary theoretical perspectives that underpin professional practice. This module will facilitate the development of intellectual, social and professional skills necessary to design and apply interventions in the workplace. The students will be stimulated to challenge some accepted models and critically reflect on their application in supporting individual wellbeing as well as personal and performance development, as well as wider organizational objectives. A broad range of topics will be covered and business case studies will be used to encourage student participation and critical engagement with the material.

Discourse (Option)
Find out more

Discourse (Option)

This module aims to develop students' knowledge of the development, theory and applications of the Discourse approach, which is a growing field within psychology. The module aims to introduce the Discourse perspective, in which language is seen as a means for people to do social actions: from blamings and invitations, to the establishment and maintenance of social relationships.

Global Marketing Strategy (Option)
Find out more

Global Marketing Strategy (Option)

This module aims to consider the strategic and tactical marketing implications for companies operating in a rapidly changing and dynamic global business environment. The module gives students the opportunity to develop a range of skills which may enable them to think strategically and tactically in the context of this globalised business world.

This module aims to provide you with the opportunity to develop an adequate understanding of the issues characterising international markets, such as the impact that macro and micro-environments have in international operations.

Human Resource Management (Level 3) (Option)
Find out more

Human Resource Management (Level 3) (Option)

The main purpose of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to appreciate the importance of the Human Resource function in an organisational context. The module aims to explore and examine strategic as well as operational aspects of the function in the light of the contemporary business environment besides the social and ethical context.

Patterns of Action (Option)
Find out more

Patterns of Action (Option)

This module aims to examine the patterns of action that underlie social behaviours such as sequences of interactions and how these affect outcomes. For instance, why do some patterns result in positive outcomes, and some result in negative outcomes. Students will have the opportunity to learn a variety of approaches, for example: Game Theory, Systems Theory, and Chaos Theory to understand not only why individuals behave in particular ways, but how to scientifically map these behavioural patterns and offer real-world insight into how to change behaviour, rather than laboratory-based theoretical approaches.

Risk Perception, Assessment and Management (Option)
Find out more

Risk Perception, Assessment and Management (Option)

This module is designed to give students the opportunity to develop a critical awareness and understanding of psychological issues typically related to the assessment, perception, communication, management and governing of risk as it affects professional practices in such areas as public health, politics, the environment, science and technology, corporate communication, and clinical/forensic psychology.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

In the first year, assessment is 54% coursework, 30% practical exams, and 16% written exams. In the second year it is 67% coursework, 31% practical exams, and 2% written exams. In the third year it is 63% coursework, 26% practical exams, and 11% written exams.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The University of Lincoln’s policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

Entrepreneurship

The University of Lincoln is proud of its approach to nurturing entrepreneurship in its students. Lectures and visiting practitioners provide insight into current practice and global issues, while real-world projects help challenge students to develop problem solving skills.

Optional Field Trips

At Lincoln International Business School, we provide opportunities for students to go on study visits that reflect the techniques they are working on. These activities are over and above timetabled lectures and seminars and are therefore not mandatory, but are designed to make the difference when discussing theory in practice. There may be some small costs involved for some trips to cover travel.

Research

At Lincoln International Business School, we take an international perspective and our research informs teaching on all of our courses. We carry out research with businesses, government and not-for-profit organisations to deepen knowledge and understanding in order to make a tangible difference to industry and society.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

2018/19 UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,700 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,000 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Access to Higher Education Diploma: A minimum of 45 level 3 credits to include 30 at merit or above.

Students will also need at least three GCSEs at grade C or above, which must include English and Maths.

We encourage applications from mature students and we will give special individual consideration to those who are in this category and do not have the standard entry requirements.

Students whose first language is not English will also need British Council IELTS band 6.0 or above or equivalent.

For international students who do not meet criteria for direct entry to this degree we offer the International Year One in Business and Management. Depending on your English language level you will study 3 or 4 terms then progress directly to the second year of this degree.

Degree preparation courses for international students:
The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visithttp://www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in independent study.

Brain, Behaviour & Cognition (Core)
Find out more

Brain, Behaviour & Cognition (Core)

This module aims to introduce students to a wide range of topics outlining the structure and functions of the brain and nervous system, and the relationship between these brain structures and the behaviours, both covert and overt, resulting from them. The module serves as the foundation for the second year core module in cognition, and a number of elective modules expand on ideas introduced here.

Developing Individual in Society (Core)
Find out more

Developing Individual in Society (Core)

This module provides an introduction to three major areas of psychological theory and research, Developmental, Social and Individual psychology. The topics are covered in Semesters A and B respectively and grouped thematically. Content across all topics is embedded in the context of major, relevant general, developmental, social and individual differences theories.

Introduction to Business Psychology (Core)
Find out more

Introduction to Business Psychology (Core)

This module aims to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the study of individual’s behaviours, thoughts and emotions in business and organisational settings. The mainstream theories concerning business, work and organisational psychology will be presented along with the techniques deployed for research and practice. A greater emphasis will be placed on several topics varying from the most investigated psychological constructs to the range of skills and competencies valued by clients and employers in the job market.

Principles of Marketing (Core)
Find out more

Principles of Marketing (Core)

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of marketing. Students will have the chance to examine the key concepts and issues of marketing.

The Business Professional (Core)
Find out more

The Business Professional (Core)

The Business Professional module provides an opportunity for students to learn about the Higher Education Environment and its connection to business. Throughout the module students will be exposed to a range of ideas that will be integral to their studies in business both from academics and business professionals. The module aims to enable students to develop transferable skills for academic study and work in a business environment.

Buyer Behaviour (Option)
Find out more

Buyer Behaviour (Option)

This module is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to understand what buyer behaviour is, why it is important for marketers and organisations; and how to initiate customer research activities to explore the increasing complexity of customer behaviour. The focus will be primary on consumer behaviour, but in addition important attention will be paid to business and organisational buyer behaviour.

Character Strengths and Virtues (Option)
Find out more

Character Strengths and Virtues (Option)

This module aims to offer students a critical introduction to the area of positive psychology referred to as character strengths and virtues. At the turn of the millennium positive psychology was launched with a multimillion dollar international research programme that aimed to identify the psychological strengths of character that are celebrated worldwide.

As a result the VIA (Values in Action) classification of strengths and virtues was published. It aimed to identify character strengths in the same way that psychiatric diagnostic systems classify psychological disorder. Since the publication of the classification handbook in 2004, the 24 strengths identified have been the subject of thousands of empirical studies across the planet.

Cross Cultural Management (Option)
Find out more

Cross Cultural Management (Option)

This module is designed for students who are thinking of a career in the international arena. It will be of use to anyone interested in working in multinationals or those interested in understanding how business is conducted across different cultures

New Ways of Working (Core)
Find out more

New Ways of Working (Core)

This 15-credit module aims to equip students with an understanding of the ways in which work is defined and experienced in the 21st century. There have been significant changes to the external business context in recent years driven by technology, changing customer demands, demography and globalization. Business psychologists can bring their understanding of people's behaviour, thoughts and emotions to the leadership and management of people engaged in work activities. Students will draw on much of the learning in the module Introduction to Business Psychology, applying psychological theories and techniques to this developing field.
Weekly workshops will enable students to understand how working patterns and practices have evolved over time and how management processes may differ depending on context. Students will be expected to develop their own analytical skills when reviewing real-life case studies of working practices.

Principles of Project Management (Option)
Find out more

Principles of Project Management (Option)

This module aims to provide a solid foundation in the theory and best practice of project management, with the aim of developing the practical skills of how to plan, implement and control projects. The module provides students with the chance to develop an understanding of the system perspective on management and a practically oriented introduction to the nature and purpose of project management and its key functions (scope, time, cost, quality, risk).

Psychological Assessment & Psychometrics (Core)
Find out more

Psychological Assessment & Psychometrics (Core)

The module aims to provide an introduction into psychological assessments using psychometrics, including questionnaires and scales. Based on the established theoretical and research context, this module will consider a range of assessment tools used in psychology to assess an individual’s behaviour or behavioural disposition, and provide an introduction into psychometric test development. The modules also aims to provide students with the opportunity to administer, score, and interpret psychological tests.

Research and Consultancy Methods (Core)
Find out more

Research and Consultancy Methods (Core)

This module explores various qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis. Students will have the chance to learn how to conduct, transcribe and analyse semi-structured and open-ended interviews and other forms of text. The principles and procedures of survey design and statistical modelling will also be discussed; students are expected to use appropriate computer-based statistical software, such as Stata, Eviews and SPSS, to analyse data.

Social Theories and Applications (Option)
Find out more

Social Theories and Applications (Option)

This optional module is designed to explore in greater depth some of the social psychological theories encountered on the degree programme. In this module, the issue of theory and application will be tackled in two ways. The early part of the module takes a series of human social behaviours as a start point and presents some of the competing theories that social psychologists have used to explain them. The later part of the module takes some of the social psychological theories as the start point and examines how successfully they have been applied to a series of human social behaviours.

Strategic Management (Option)
Find out more

Strategic Management (Option)

The overall objective of module is for students to understand and rigorously apply the principal concepts, analytical frameworks and techniques of strategic management.

Team Dynamics (Core)
Find out more

Team Dynamics (Core)

This 30-credit module aims to equip students with a broad understanding of group behaviour in an organisational setting. The ability to work effectively in a team and build positive relationships with clients and colleagues is integral to the work conducted by Business Psychologists. Throughout this module, students will be encouraged to think critically about research in this area, about their own practice, and the problems and issues they see in organisations.
In the first term, weekly workshops will introduce students to some of the important psychological processes which occur in groups. Practical exercises will be used to support students to develop and improve a range of skills vital to effective teamwork and expected by graduate employers. These include problem-solving, decision-making, interpersonal communication, conflict-resolution and project management skills as well as others associated with developing personal effectiveness and credibility at work.
In the second term, students will have the opportunity to apply these skills outside of the classroom by working in small teams on a community engagement learning project. Students will be supported through this process by a series of tutorials and workshops on project management. By the end of the module, students will have compiled a portfolio of reflections and evidence which can be used to inform the design of future teambuilding interventions.

Business Psychology in Practice (Core)
Find out more

Business Psychology in Practice (Core)

The 30-credit module Business Psychology in Practice will take an applied and evidence-based approach to exploring contemporary theoretical perspectives that underpin professional practice. This module will facilitate the development of intellectual, social and professional skills necessary to design and apply interventions in the workplace. The students will be stimulated to challenge some accepted models and critically reflect on their application in supporting individual wellbeing as well as personal and performance development, as well as wider organizational objectives. A broad range of topics will be covered and business case studies will be used to encourage student participation and critical engagement with the material.

Discourse (Option)
Find out more

Discourse (Option)

This module aims to develop students' knowledge of the development, theory and applications of the Discourse approach, which is a growing field within psychology. The module aims to introduce the Discourse perspective, in which language is seen as a means for people to do social actions: from blamings and invitations, to the establishment and maintenance of social relationships.

Global Marketing Strategy (Option)
Find out more

Global Marketing Strategy (Option)

This module aims to consider the strategic and tactical marketing implications for companies operating in a rapidly changing and dynamic global business environment. The module gives students the opportunity to develop a range of skills which may enable them to think strategically and tactically in the context of this globalised business world.

This module aims to provide you with the opportunity to develop an adequate understanding of the issues characterising international markets, such as the impact that macro and micro-environments have in international operations.

Human Resource Management (Level 3) (Option)
Find out more

Human Resource Management (Level 3) (Option)

The main purpose of this module is to provide students with the opportunity to appreciate the importance of the Human Resource function in an organisational context. The module aims to explore and examine strategic as well as operational aspects of the function in the light of the contemporary business environment besides the social and ethical context.

Patterns of Action (Option)
Find out more

Patterns of Action (Option)

This module aims to examine the patterns of action that underlie social behaviours such as sequences of interactions and how these affect outcomes. For instance, why do some patterns result in positive outcomes, and some result in negative outcomes. Students will have the opportunity to learn a variety of approaches, for example: Game Theory, Systems Theory, and Chaos Theory to understand not only why individuals behave in particular ways, but how to scientifically map these behavioural patterns and offer real-world insight into how to change behaviour, rather than laboratory-based theoretical approaches.

Risk Perception, Assessment and Management (Option)
Find out more

Risk Perception, Assessment and Management (Option)

This module is designed to give students the opportunity to develop a critical awareness and understanding of psychological issues typically related to the assessment, perception, communication, management and governing of risk as it affects professional practices in such areas as public health, politics, the environment, science and technology, corporate communication, and clinical/forensic psychology.

†The availability of optional modules may vary from year to year and will be subject to minimum student numbers being achieved. This means that the availability of specific optional modules cannot be guaranteed. Optional module selection may also be affected by staff availability.

In the first year, assessment is 54% coursework, 30% practical exams, and 16% written exams. In the second year it is 67% coursework, 31% practical exams, and 2% written exams. In the third year it is 63% coursework, 26% practical exams, and 11% written exams.

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that may be used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The University of Lincoln’s policy is to ensure that staff return assessments to students promptly.

Entrepreneurship

The University of Lincoln is proud of its approach to nurturing entrepreneurship in its students. Lectures and visiting practitioners provide insight into current practice and global issues, while real-world projects help challenge students to develop problem solving skills.

Optional Field Trips

At Lincoln International Business School, we provide opportunities for students to go on study visits that reflect the techniques they are working on. These activities are over and above timetabled lectures and seminars and are therefore not mandatory, but are designed to make the difference when discussing theory in practice. There may be some small costs involved for some trips to cover travel.

Research

At Lincoln International Business School, we take an international perspective and our research informs teaching on all of our courses. We carry out research with businesses, government and not-for-profit organisations to deepen knowledge and understanding in order to make a tangible difference to industry and society.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teaching and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

2018/19 UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £14,700 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2019/20UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,250 per level £15,000 per level
Part-time £77.00 per credit point†  N/A
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt


†Please note that not all courses are available as a part-time option.

The University undergraduate tuition fee may increase year on year in line with government policy. This will enable us to continue to provide the best possible educational facilities and student experience.

Fees for enrolment on additional modules

Tuition fees for additional activity are payable by the student/sponsor and charged at the equivalent £ per credit point rate for each module. Additional activity includes:

- Enrolment on modules that are in addition to the validated programme curriculum

- Enrolment on modules that are over and above the full credit diet for the relevant academic year

- Retakes of modules as permitted by the Board of Examiners

- In exceptional circumstances, students who are required to re-take modules can do so on an 'assessment only' basis. This means that students do not attend timetabled teaching events but are required to take the assessments/examinations associated with the module(s). The 'assessment only' fee is half of the £ per credit point fee for each module.

Exceptionally, tuition fees may not be payable where a student has been granted a retake with approved extenuating circumstances.

For more information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/]

Additional Costs

For each course students may find that there are additional costs. These may be with regard to the specific clothing, materials or equipment required, depending on their subject area. Some courses provide opportunities for students to undertake field work or field trips. Where these are compulsory, the cost for the travel, accommodation and meals may be covered by the University and so is included in the fee. Where these are optional students will normally (unless stated otherwise) be required to pay their own transportation, accommodation and meal costs.

With regards to text books, the University provides students who enrol with a comprehensive reading list and our extensive library holds either material or virtual versions of the core texts that students are required to read. However, students may prefer to purchase some of these for themselves and will therefore be responsible for this cost. Where there may be exceptions to this general rule, information will be displayed in a section titled Other Costs below.

GCE Advanced Levels: BBC

International Baccalaureate: 29 points overall

BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Merit, Merit

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, which must include English and Maths. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may also be considered.

EU and International students whose first language is not English will require English Language IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element, or equivalent http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.


If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk

Learn from Experts

Throughout this degree, students may receive tuition from professors, senior lecturers, lecturers, researchers, practitioners, visiting experts or technicians, and they may also be supported in their learning by other students.


Your Future Career

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.

Careers Service

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with students to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during their time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing a course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise our graduates future opportunities.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/.


Facilities

This course is taught in the award-winning David Chiddick Building, which is situated in the centre of the city of Lincoln on the Brayford campus. It provides dedicated teaching and learning spaces and comprises lecture theatres, workshop rooms, IT laboratories and a café. Software including SAGE is available for you to use, as well as SPSS, Datastream (the source of financial and economic data), and FT.com.

At Lincoln, we constantly invest in our campus as we aim to provide the best learning environment for our students. Whatever the area of study, the University strives to ensure you have access to the specialist equipment and resources you need to develop the skills you may need in their future career.

Students also make the most of the University's award-winning Great Central Warehouse Library, which provides access to more than 250,000 printed books and over 400,000 electronic books and journals, as well as databases and specialist collections. The Library has a range of different spaces for shared and individual learning.


The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages, although the University may make changes in accordance with the Student Admissions Terms and Conditions.