Research

Sustainable Architecture and Built Environment: buildings and cities

Research in The Lincoln School of Architecture and the Built Environment

Research in The Lincoln School of Architecture and the Built Environment is undertaken through three overlapping research themes. Staff work collaboratively across the themes, with other schools within the University, and with other institutions nationally and internationally.

For information about research in the School please contact Professor Behzad Sodagar, Director of Research.

Research Themes

Research Project Examples

Sustainable Community Building

The underpinning research initially started through a two year externally funded Knowledge Transfer Partnership project (KTP) with Lincoln School of Architecture and the Built Environment in partnership with Hill Holt Wood (HHW) Social Enterprise as collaborating partners. The aim of the KTP was to develop a range of autonomous eco buildings for HHW with an aim to establish HHW as a social enterprise construction company.

The construction of the Sustainable Community Building, one of the main outputs of the research, started in 2008 and was completed in 2010. The Building was officially opened in 2011. The building is split into three use groups allowing for the flexible and multiple occupation required by the various activities at Hill Holt Wood. These are; the round rammed earth Hall with reciprocal timber roof, the Link with a green roof housing the café and exhibitions, and the Box housing the plant, kitchen and services on the ground floor and offices on the first floor. The box is constructed in highly insulated timber construction.

The design of the building is based on principles of passive solar design utilising natural light, ventilation, thermal mass, and insulation. Thermal simulation analyses carried out during the design phase of the project concluded that the building is of low heating energy demand requiring 23 KWh/m2/year, well below the heating demand of “Good Practice” community centres.

Research carried out during the design phase of the project to assess the burden of embodied materials revealed that the materials emissions rate for the building is of the order of 332.27 kg Co2/m2. The estimated value is much less than that for a conventionally constructed building with a similar function at 800-1200 kg Co2/m2.